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Autodesk

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Autodesk

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October 6, 2022

Pros

Work-life balance Management support involving in different projects Team is great Good relationship from management Lots of instruments that make the work easy Every quarter we see the results of it in different levels (local, emarging, emea, LC emea) there are lots of incentive programmes

Cons

The salary is not too high and it increases 0-12% per year

life balance Management support involving in different projects Team is great Good relationship from management Lots of instruments that make the work easy Every quarter we see the results of it in different levels (local, emarging, emea, LC emea) there are lots of incentive programmes Read More

October 6, 2022

Reviewed by: License Compliance (Current Contractor)

July 12, 2022

Pros

They have a few benefits but are still below the average compared to other tech companies in Dublin.

Cons

The management in Autodesk is based on micromanagement. The managers try to integrate the workaholic culture into EMEA such as working overtime and giving blood for the company. They have their visa sponsored by the company, therefore, they have to please them and behave like that. They work for Autodesk for over 13 years in customer service, hence they will never leave except if they are laid off. The managers I had were super passive and with very limited critical thinking. They always obey whatever comes from AMER and don't act as managers. This is too bad for the team since we don't learn from someone who doesn't think outside the box and has a fragile ego. Furthermore, you cannot speak your mind as they take things very personally and it will harm and affect your internal career path. However, there are no career progression opportunities, so it doesn't really matter. Managers work for an IT company but they are not tech-savvy. Their main concern is to hit the target. No encouragement to learn, progress and get a promotion. You won't learn that much as a Customer Service Specialist in Autodesk as their process is very old school. They still use software that nobody does like Siebel. Autodesk is not an innovative company. All processes take too long without ETA to apply new technologies and promising advanced software into their processes. As they don't have many competitors in the market, their policies are not satisfactory to the customers that spend thousands of dollars with their software. The rep is responsible to deal with that and ensure to keep the CSAT score. which makes me think that Autodesk is not a customer-oriented company. The customer service department has been outsourced and plenty of employees were laid off. No diversity in the company either. You won't see mixed ethnicity like black people, LGBTQ, or non-European women in management positions. Last but not the least, even the director says: if not happy, look for another job externally.

Advice to Management

Make sure to learn the difference between acting like a boss and a leader. You are a number regardless of how long you work for the company.

The managers try to integrate the workaholic culture into EMEA such as working overtime and giving blood for the company. Read More

July 12, 2022

Reviewed by: Customer Service Representative in Dublin, Dublin (Former Employee)

November 20, 2022

Pros

Flexibilty of work. Going to office is not mandatory but have to live in close distance from it. During Covid and after we got extra holidays (like 5-6 days). CEO is great and company makes best in class software for certain professions.

Cons

Like with any other corporation its about relationships and how well you can sell your work to management if you want to get promoted. Also, managers rotate more often so you get in the loop of building your career plan everytime from scratch with new manager.

Like with any other corporation its about relationships and how well you can sell your work to management if you want to get promoted. Read More

November 20, 2022

Reviewed by: Renewals Specialist in Barcelona (Current Employee)

December 29, 2021

Pros

Overall great benefits - C staff took great care of employees during COVID, offering monthly company holidays, vested stock plans, and guaranteed no layoffs. The majority of employees are friendly and willing to help.

Cons

When I began working at Autodesk I was told that your happiness greatly depends on your manager. While my time at Autodesk was great to begin with, my team became increasingly toxic during the pandemic with a new director that asked for too much from the team, and increasing hostility, bullying, and manipulation from my manager. The team was expected to work long hours including early mornings and late nights, there was no recognition or career growth opportunities, and the pandemic further intensified discontinuity among the team. Overall the team seemed overworked as management has no room for human error and continually increases workload without adding resources.

Advice to Management

Burn out culture is prevalent in Autodesk, and it seems only those who are willing to make Autodesk their entire life will have any career growth or chance of promotion. While the benefits are great, compensation is poor and not enough to incentivize employees to stay. HR should listen to complaints and investigate toxic management.

Overall the team seemed overworked as management has no room for human error and continually increases workload without adding resources. Read More

December 29, 2021

Reviewed by: Channel Program Specialist in San Francisco, CA (Former Employee)

August 12, 2021

Pros

Nice offices. Some smart people. Fun internal and customer events. There are some good middle managers who look out for you and want to do great work. Autodesk has a monopoly in their industry so they spend money on lots of random things that make the environment and company feel plush. Good place to do individual work but you do not want to be in management, or try to learn it there.

Cons

The politics are sharky----upper managers and the exec team are more focused on looking good than delivering value. The marketing-background CEO got his job by selling Wall Street a cloud and construction industry story that pumped up the stock price. The culture of looking good vs. doing good permeates. Autodesk does not innovate, it grows entirely through acquisition. Acquired teams leave quickly or are shown the door. Comically, the CEO of Autodesk's biggest acquisition ever left in a year and on her LinkedIn claims she was the "VP of Nothing".

Advice to Management

Not sure how you change a monopoly culture, or if you really want to. Seems to pay you well. Keep it up!

There are some good middle managers who look out for you and want to do great work. Read More

August 12, 2021

Reviewed by: Director in San Francisco, CA (Former Employee)

September 4, 2022

Pros

I’ve moved around the company a bit over time but mostly worked within the Research org where I am based now. My role is fairly broad covering development, customer collaboration and defining research projects. I have an amazing team based around the world reporting to me. Overall the projects are interesting and one of the reasons I come into the office everyday. The office is a nice environment and great for collaboration with those that do turn up. We have a great social atmosphere and we’ve grown together, another reason why I enjoy working where I do. I’ve learnt a huge amount while I’ve been at Autodesk. A lot of areas of management are often new and difficult for someone from a more technical background but I’ve managed to get enough help to be successful in the role. There’s some really great mentors and people you can learn from.

Cons

There’s been a period of significant slowdown. At least in part due to the pandemic but it seems the culture has shifted even though it’s approaching nearly a year since the last shutdown. I think a lot of projects lost momentum and people started to question their purpose and belonging which led to a shift in the way research is being undertaken, fewer but larger projects rather than many smaller ones (although oddly it seems like we are still doing many disconnected small projects just under the umbrella of a larger one). This process has taken so long to bring in, half of research has been unable to do anything for about 6 months. There’s been a high turnover of staff recently. The market is very strong even now despite the downturn in the tech stock market. Autodesk is struggling a bit to compete on salaries but that isn’t always the things that drive us, importantly the work that we do has been paused for a long time people left so they could actually do something. A lot of the recent departures were waiting to see what the new changes to research were and clearly they didn’t like it. From the teams I work with there’s been a 20-50% departure rate recently. This does hurt moral somewhat. In the past the way we approached work was very simple. Find a customer problem or develop our own and then develop a solution to it. The new way is very slow, layered with process and far from simple. This could wear people down if it’s not done right. The company has a flexible approach to work but this is perhaps a little too flexible. I think they are suffering a bit with “quiet quitting”. Work from home whilst working well for many is potentially being spoilt by a few. Managers are a little reluctant to weed these out as there is no guarantee they will get the headcount to replace them. As a very motivated and driven person knowing people are doing the minimum and not willing to push themselves does make me question if I’m in the right environment to push myself. Fortunately the groups in the office are really motivated individuals and that gives me a lot of energy.

Advice to Management

The effort with changes to try and improve the way we do research is really welcome but keep iterating on it as we may see some more turnover particularly as the market picks up in the new year. We’ve lost a lot of really talented people recently which is hurting moral. Perhaps get some feedback from people working on the new Research projects to understand if they are really happy with what they are doing. I really hope these workout well for the company.

A lot of areas of management are often new and difficult for someone from a more technical background but I’ve managed to get enough help to be successful in the role. Read More

September 4, 2022

Reviewed by: Research Scientist (Current Employee)

January 27, 2021

Pros

Great folks, working on cool products

Cons

To many Sr leaders in Autodesk, you have managers running a team of 50 and then you have directors with 2 or less reports, no growth, and very stagnant in your job

Advice to Management

Balance out the responsibilities, managers with 50 reports and directors with 2, not a great message to send to folks, very Lob cited

To many Sr leaders in Autodesk, you have managers running a team of 50 and then you have directors with 2 or less reports, no growth, and very stagnant in your job Read More

January 27, 2021

Reviewed by: Software Develpper in Novi, MI (Current Employee)

December 4, 2020

Pros

Average salary, company stocks, working from home during the pandemic.

Cons

The work environment is toxic that managers know about it, but are too comfortable and don't want to change anything. If you like working in a "game of thrones" political company, join us. All the good people are leaving 1 by 1 to other companies, no exit interviews because managers simply don't care. Promotions based on how well you fake it and play the political game. Do you want a promotion? Keep on dreaming. Promotions are rare and your peers prefer to burry you down with bad reviews so they would look better than you. Managers feel that they are gods and immune to feedback. They simply don't care and some of them got promoted based on their butt-kissing ability. If you dare to challenge the status quo, to think out of the box, to try to change something, you get marginalized, obstacles are put in your way, and you hit so many walls until they make you quit. I saw so many great colleagues forced to leave so others can continue to sleep in peace.

Advice to Management

Advice to leadership: next time layoffs happen, do some cleaning among managers. Even Andrew, the CEO, admitted there are a lot of bad managers in Autodesk. We all see them, but our feedback does not matter.

All the good people are leaving 1 by 1 to other companies, no exit interviews because managers simply don't care. Read More

December 4, 2020

Reviewed by: Software Developer in Montreal, QC (Current Employee)

September 3, 2021

Pros

Great culture worldwide, excellent training programs, excellent benefits, you can reach out to anyone at Autodesk easily

Cons

If you entered in a junior role it's very hard to become a manager, it's better to leave and then come back again. Some offices has very bad culture and toxic environment and unexperinced managers, always check the office you have an interest working in before joining

Advice to Management

You emphesis on the culture yet some offices are very poor in implementing the culture.

Some offices has very bad culture and toxic environment and unexperinced managers, always check the office you have an interest working in before joining Read More

September 3, 2021

Reviewed by: Experienced Senior Territory Sales Representative in Ḩawwārah, Amman Governorate (Current Employee)

January 31, 2023

Pros

Colleagues are generally nice Good Culture Good Work Life Balance

Cons

- Contingent workers typically have limited benefits compared to full-time or fixed term employees, including fewer job security and limited access to company perks and benefits. This can result in feelings of exclusion from the company culture. - People are generally nice but this may not be representative of the entire company and can vary depending on the team and your boss. Working under a micromanaging boss who restricts where you work, despite the company's flexible work policy, can be challenging. This type of management style can limit an employee's freedom and flexibility, which can negatively impact job satisfaction and the overall work environment. - The company may have a wealth of resources but access to and utilization of those resources can sometimes be difficult. This can be especially true if the process for obtaining help and support with using the resources is not clearly defined or easily accessible.

This type of management style can limit an employee's freedom and flexibility, which can negatively impact job satisfaction and the overall work environment. Read More

January 31, 2023

Reviewed by: Anonymous (Current Contractor)

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