ELS Educational Services FAQ

Have questions about working at ELS Educational Services? Read answers to frequently asked questions to help you make a choice before applying to a job or accepting a job offer.

Whether it's about compensation and benefits, culture and diversity, or you're curious to know more about the work environment, find out from employees what it's like to work at ELS Educational Services.

All answers shown come directly from ELS Educational Services Reviews and are not edited or altered.

35 English questions out of 35

May 8, 2019

What is paid time off like at ELS Educational Services?

Pros

paid time off and health insurance

Cons

curriculum is poorly designed and students' time is often wasted on non-academic activities

Advice to Management

I have been teaching ESL/EFL for ten years in many different capacities. I’ve worked at public elementary schools, universities, one-on-one tutoring services, and private language academies. I understand that no school is perfect and that some things must be compromised in order for teachers to make a living. That being said, I have loved teaching at all of those institutions. I loved teaching until I came to ELS. As a new hire, I was offered little to no orientation or training in ELS procedures with the exception of one quick hour of training and my "teacher buddy", who was expected to train me for free in their spare time. I found my new job chaotic, and I often felt inadequate as I was asked to complete tasks that I was unfamiliar with or when I did something in a way that made sense to me but was wrong to ELS. Furthermore, the way that procedures are described in handbooks and by management is often not how they actually are. This makes it very confusing and disheartening to adapt here. There is not enough time for teachers to teach all of the curriculum in a 4-week period, especially with extracurricular activities cutting into class time. The books, above all reading & writing, are written well above the students' level and contain much more content than what is possible to teach in a session. These factors force instructors to pick from the curriculum only the content that will be on the final exam (for SSP) or that will be essential to writing the final essay (RW), allowing next to no time for realistic practice and leaving students stressed and frustrated. I find it difficult to follow one of the core teachings of my masters in TESOL program: “Teach what you assess, and assess what you teach”. On the subject of tests, the numerous required assessments take up a sizable chunk of class time that would be better used for more in-depth instruction or practice. The amount of assessments also takes a toll on teachers' time outside of class as we grade stacks of writing, re-writing, and quizzes. As for grading, what a sham. When it came time to finalize grades, I was shocked to discover that I was asked to CHANGE THE SCORES that I had given using carefully-crafted quizzes and rubrics in addition to my own professional assessment. This process made me feel dishonest as well as untrustworthy, and it makes ELS seem much more like a business than like a school. I would feel more comfortable at ELS if some of the procedures and materials were revised and reorganized. In my opinion, new hires who have no experience with ELS should be given face-to-face training as a standard and not as an exception. This training should be given by both an administrative staff member and an experienced teacher who is paid for their time. In addition, extracurricular activities such as speed conversation and holiday celebrations should be just that- extracurricular. Students pay for their academic hours, and taking that time away is stealing. Furthermore, the number of quizzes and writing assessments should be reduced- a midterm in SSP which includes a speaking component and a midterm reading test with a writing component should be sufficient to assess what students need to work on for the final exam or project. The grading system is appalling. Either the ELS rubrics and reading quizzes should be revised to match the expected outcome of grades, or the teachers’ professional expertise and assessment should be taken at face value. Finally, my heart sank when I read the new hire manual. It referred to our students, who have faces and names and dreams, as customers. Is that all they are?

paid time off and health insurance

May 8, 2019

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December 3, 2019

Does ELS Educational Services offer massages?

Pros

- Friendly and helpful staffs - Bonus and travel allowance - Free flow of coffee and tea

Cons

- Not much self and career growth - Required handle a lot of work that's out from the scope of the job - Little compensation and raise pay - No clear job instructions from the first day - A lot of self-learning and discovery in the center

Free flow of coffee and tea

December 3, 2019

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May 25, 2020

Does ELS Educational Services offer dental insurance?

Pros

Good health insurance especially for dental work

Cons

No potential for growth with the company

Good health insurance especially for dental work

May 25, 2020

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May 5, 2020

Does ELS Educational Services offer a wellness program?

Pros

Health benefits, coworkers, and leadership

Cons

Company is still trying to find its identity post-merger. Low compensation for workload, and the higher education industry is unstable.

Health benefits, coworkers, and leadership

May 5, 2020

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May 25, 2020

What is health insurance like at ELS Educational Services?

Pros

Good health insurance especially for dental work

Cons

No potential for growth with the company

Good health insurance especially for dental work

May 25, 2020

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35 English questions out of 35

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