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What are perks and other benefits like at Gartner?

12 English reviews out of 12

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October 29, 2019

Pros

Incredible investment in onboarding and training of new staff, lots of autonomy and respect for work/life balance, great HR benefits, full-time remote positions available, high earnings potential

Cons

Clear lack of people management training for managers

Incredible investment in onboarding and training of new staff, lots of autonomy and respect for work/life balance, great HR benefits, full-time remote positions available, high earnings potential

October 29, 2019

Reviewed by: Anonymous in United States (Current Employee)

November 10, 2020

Pros

Good work-life balance - flexible schedules, wellness rooms, remote working Excellent PTO- start at 20 days work up to 35 days plus federal holidays Great health benefits and perks - Cigna, commuter benefits, incentifit, gym

Cons

Mediocre pay No job security - organization is constantly "restructuring", value shareholders over employees, jobs are cut with little notice Lack of transparency Lack of diversity and inclusion support

Advice to Management

Gartner complains about their high turn over rate, but fails to provide adequate job security. All the benefits and perks are nice, but if employees are worried about losing their jobs, they will continue to look elsewhere and leave.

Great health benefits and perks - Cigna, commuter benefits, incentifit, gym

November 10, 2020

Reviewed by: Anonymous in United States (Current Employee)

March 10, 2019

Pros

You will learn how to talk to C-level executives. You’ll also get to run sales cycles from start to finish. There are plenty of resources (blogs, landing pages, short research articles) to leverage when prospecting. The training was also pretty good when I went through it in 2017 and was valuable for a person early on in their sales career. Having Gartner on your resume will open a lot of doors. Some of the people you work with will be talented, smart, and collaborative. My team was pretty close and I will miss them. Generous benefits package and cool little perks like reimbursing fitness expenses and free fruit until 10 am. The campus in Fort Myers is newly built with great accommodations, like a cafe with a large selection and a gym that rivals most commercial gyms in Southwest Florida. There is a potential to make good money. More on that below.

Cons

Everything I discuss here revolves around managing SMB accounts that are technology start-ups. I can not speak for the core business units (End User) or other revenue bands above my channel. Also, even knowing the things below, I would still recommend taking this job for the name on the resume alone. How long you’ll want to stay will depend on a few factors. So much of your success at Gartner depends on things outside of your control, namely the book of business you inherit, the analysts, and your manager. And I know what you may be thinking, “that’s sales” but this goes beyond that. I talked with people who had been in sales for 5+ years that said that this wasn’t a typical situation where you just work harder to build pipeline to make up for it. You have to hope that your boss actually has some leadership skills instead of just sales numbers. Mine certainly didn’t. You have to hope that your clients don’t go out of business, get acquired, or weren’t missold (mine were). You also have to hope the previous person managing your book didn’t just try to milk their accounts for all their worth before they left since any takedown wouldn’t count against them in their new job. In HT, the one thing all the clients want is the one thing you can’t deliver, research mentions. Account Managers on their way out frequently start promising that Gartner will write about the client if only they pay more money. Guess what happens when Gartner doesn’t write about the client? They don’t renew and as an Account Manager you are heavily measured on retention. Do not be confused. This is no longer a sales job. This is a true account management job with some minor upselling. Most people have 1-2 deals a year. Those are enterprise length sales cycles for entry level pay. I do not know why they recruit so heavily from sales programs across the country. You may be told that Gartner has had double digit growth for the past x amount of quarters which I’m sure is true for the company as a whole. That is NOT true for the channel I was in. The best performing region grew by 1%. Let that sink in when they say limitless opportunity to you over and over like you don’t have common sense. At the most, I had 6 accounts to retain and grow (with one having been oversold, something my boss even admitted to me but hey that’s a growth opportunity /s). The territory I could prospect into was not in a prime market and was organized by the name of the company. My team had 15 letters in 2 different states to split 8 ways. In the end, you’re looking at a list of about 80 names that have been called, emailed, and LinkedIn’ed for no less than 4 years. You won’t know any details when they tell you they’ve been in sales cycles before because there is no CRM. Bask in the irony that a company that recommends CRMs to other companies doesn’t use one in any meaningful way. The sad part is that they’ve segmented this channel even further and that beat up list looks closer to 40 names today, if you’re lucky. They’ve drastically reduced quota because they realized that bad sales may have led to a 68% retention rate. What happens when your 3 clients aren’t biting on your suggested upsells? Limitless opportunity. So what happens when 2 accounts don’t renew and the bad fit companies on your list aren’t buying? You make 20% of your target income. Luckily, the cost of living is low in Southwest Florida so make sure to always budget to your base. Especially if you get hired now. Last year they rolled out a training where new hires got to shadow calls and get paid their target for at least 6 months. It was awesome to watch as I struggled to hit unrealistic metrics. So hey you too can be paid for watching other people work. But when you hit the floor and start getting paid base for the rest of the year as you don’t sell anything, reality may sting a bit. Limitless opportunity. Plus, what you’re selling is access to analysts who cover the IT industry in one area or another. What happens if that person is rude? Doesn’t know as much as the client? What if they stop covering their space? I had a situation where a group of analysts that my client talked to the most left within a month of each other. Analysts would frequently reject requests for calls and pass it off to someone else because they are more focused on EU customers. My clients were paying $60,000 and up annually (some more than 200k) for this to happen. I couldn’t point to business value in almost any instance as they repeatedly just told me that they had “interesting conversations.” Wonder why they looked at Gartner as a nice to have. All of the clients who remained were mentioned in research. Limitless opportunity. In this position, you will not have a very high paying plan unless you overachieve. Maybe 30-40% people do that and so many of them just inherit a deal when they hit the floor in Q4. That was also fun to watch while my boss rubbed all of my team’s clients the wrong way and ruined our deals with his micromanagement and selfish motives. If you like having a lot of free time, or doing a lot of busy work that has nothing to do with sales, you might be able to drink the Gartnerade forever. I moved on for all of the above reasons and more. Read the other Glassdoor review titled “Gartner: A Case Study in Brand Destruction and Hierarchical Management Paranoia” for a perspective from an analyst. If you can tough it out, you’ll be able to make a significant step up into an actual tech sales career. Best of luck in keeping your sanity for the 12ish months that most reps stay.

Generous benefits package and cool little perks like reimbursing fitness expenses and free fruit until 10 am.

March 10, 2019

Reviewed by: Account Manager in Fort Myers, FL (Former Employee)

September 19, 2020

Pros

Good Salary Work life balance Decent bonus

Cons

No perks other than salary

No perks other than salary

September 19, 2020

Reviewed by: Lead Software Engineer in Bangalore (Current Employee)

December 17, 2019

Pros

The only good thing is compensation.

Cons

1) A huge gap between the Job Description and actual job profile. 2) Leaders are keen to hire graduates from IITs and IIMs but do not have profiles that are on par with there experience and knowledge. This is one of the reasons for the high attrition rate. 3) No perks are other than cab facility. Leaders keep on telling that company is going through a cost optimization journey which is why there will no parties no Diwali gifts. 4) Leaders do not have any vision and do not care much about the employee's career goal or path

Advice to Management

Please stop lying to hire people with a good background. Also, take your employee surveys seriously.

3) No perks are other than cab facility.

December 17, 2019

Reviewed by: Senior Business Analyst in Gurgaon, Haryana (Current Employee)

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12 English reviews out of 12