Gartner FAQ

All answers shown come directly from Gartner Reviews and are not edited or altered.

49 English questions out of 49

November 10, 2020

What are perks and other benefits like at Gartner?

Pros

Good work-life balance - flexible schedules, wellness rooms, remote working Excellent PTO- start at 20 days work up to 35 days plus federal holidays Great health benefits and perks - Cigna, commuter benefits, incentifit, gym

Cons

Mediocre pay No job security - organization is constantly "restructuring", value shareholders over employees, jobs are cut with little notice Lack of transparency Lack of diversity and inclusion support

Advice to Management

Gartner complains about their high turn over rate, but fails to provide adequate job security. All the benefits and perks are nice, but if employees are worried about losing their jobs, they will continue to look elsewhere and leave.

Great health benefits and perks - Cigna, commuter benefits, incentifit, gym

November 10, 2020

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January 8, 2021

What is health insurance like at Gartner?

Pros

Great health insurance and 401k.

Cons

It’s 20 year olds managing other 20 year olds. Your voice won’t be heard. You can be the best at your job but if you don’t play politics or don’t stroke your boss’s ego, you won’t do well here.

Advice to Management

You’re supposed to be a best-practice company yet you don’t apply any of your research into your own company. It’s pathetic.

Great health insurance and 401k.

January 8, 2021

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May 17, 2020

Does Gartner pay for a gym membership?

Pros

In the office there is a fantastic gym and free fruit.You are thrust into fantastic events which are extremely well put together. You have the opportunity to travel the world but due to long hours, you won't see much.

Cons

The majority of people I met weren't that friendly. Whilst working at a conference you are expected to work extremely long hours, 14 hours approx. You are not paid overtime hours which is not stipulated during the interview process. The interview process is long and tiresome.

Advice to Management

Pay your staff for hours spent on-site at events or give them the correct amount of time off. I was shocked to learn some managers will let their staff have a full weekend back but other managers would only give 1 day of the 2 weekend back. Do not expect staff to work after hours, this is not healthy.

In the office there is a fantastic gym and free fruit.You are thrust into fantastic events which are extremely well put together.

May 17, 2020

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December 8, 2018

Does Gartner offer disability insurance?

Pros

Benefits are good. The Gartner name is valuable.

Cons

I actually started out working for a small business that was bought by Gartner. This review is about how Gartner changed my company, and why it led me to quit. But reviews are boring! So here’s a bunch of similes and metaphors that capture the experience of working for one of the world's premiere tech research firms. Being acquired by Gartner is like Edmund's relationship with the White Witch in The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe. At the start, it's all about inclusion! Diversity! Welcome! We're simply THRILLED to have a son of Adam with us! You will be a valuable part of our team! Pull up a chair and have some turkish delight, kid. But, that "spirit of inclusion" they talk about is superficial. Case in point: I have a mental disability, and my direct supervisor put me in a position that exacerbated that disability. She was well aware I had it. She just didn't seem to care. And, when push came to shove, HR ganged up on me, as well. Diversity and inclusion are buzzwords for Gartner, like they are for most of the corporate left. Diversity is something you put on the homepage, or a brochure. If the diversity is fashionable (race, gender, sexuality), the company considers it an asset. If the diversity is inconvenient (mental disability, ideological differences), they'll do what they can to get rid of it. Being acquired by Gartner is like The Brady Bunch mixed with an evil stepmother fairy tale. Gartner brought in a new CEO who didn’t understand our company and insulted us on the first day. They assigned my team a manager who also didn’t get our company, insulted my supervisors, and talked about us behind our backs. They assigned that manager a second-in-command who never quite understood how we operated, and sneered at our work. If you can picture Mike Brady negging Marcia, you’ve got what it’s like to be acquired by Gartner. Being acquired by Gartner’s like dating a manipulative significant other. They see what they could make you, rather than who you are, and what you can do. They’re embarrassed enough by you that they mention to no one you’re together, until they’ve had time to groom you properly. You're not a person…you’re potential. Juicy, lucrative potential. The personality, they can erase later. Being acquired by Gartner is like Aesop’s fable of the golden chain. The benefits are great, so long as you agree to give up your freedom and individuality. Mind you, most of the Gartner analysts and authors I worked with were friendly and helpful. But Gartner’s corporate culture keeps talented people from being more than the sum of their parts. Alone, they’re mostly nice, interesting individuals. Together, the groupthink takes hold, and things can get petty. Being acquired by Gartner is like going to a soulless northeast prep school. Think Dead Poets’ Society with no Robin Williams. You go in hoping for eventual benefit, and you’ll get it…but you’re going to have to fight off elitism, snobbery, and a cliquish mindset that excludes anyone who doesn’t fit the northeast corporate mold. Being acquired by Gartner is like marrying into the Lannisters from Game of Thrones. They look great, present well, keep up with trends, and are very well heeled. But, they’ve got no soul. And, like in GoT, the decent Lannisters tend to wind up elsewhere.

Advice to Management

Make your "commitment to diversity and inclusion" more than skin deep. Unless you hire people with diverse styles of cognitive processing, or diverse opinions, you'll continue to push out the people who could do you the most good.

Case in point: I have a mental disability, and my direct supervisor put me in a position that exacerbated that disability.

December 8, 2018

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July 31, 2019

Does Gartner offer health savings accounts?

Pros

Incredibly fair comp plan for sales, especially for Account Management group where the book of business you get handed largely defines your initial success. Comp plan has very few disincentives unlike most organizations where it can feel like comp plan is specifically designed to screw you over. If you ask and press there's a ton of opportunities and options for advancement. Company has standardized workstations with standing desks, fast computers, and dual monitors. Crazy opportunity for early-mid career people to interact with senior technology leaders that would otherwise never talk to them. Incredible learning experience with access to the depth/breadth of Gartner's research. Company is very explicit about supporting you whenever you have an issue (dr apts, vet apts, unexpected events, etc) Resources available are massive but rarely used.

Cons

Poor communication from the top down on approaches and metrics. Things change rapidly and we're agile which is great but it almost never makes it down to the floor unless you know people or constantly bug your VP/HR. Yet again, nobody knows how mid-year raises are working this year or what they're based on despite being a month into q3 A lot of new reps have difficulty grasping selling an intangible product and there's high turnover on the manager level since most promoted managers are just successful reps. Your Gartner experience varies widely based on your direct-line manager. I happen to have an exceptional one and a fantastic VP, but I know my experience is atypical. Some managers are very wet behind the ears and focused on the wrong metrics. No reason to have dial sheets when you're paying reps at least 100k a year to manage and grow high value accounts. You really need to adjust your approach based on what that particular manager wants (even though everyone sits next to everyone else). We've lost focus on delivering ongoing value to clients and a lot of reps just pitch new products quarterly instead of being invested in their accounts which turns off a lot of IT leaders from engaging. Most new people don't understand that your performance in training dictates your initial opportunity and just try to coast. You're constantly being evaluated from every level. Health insurance out of pockets can be intimidating. Gartner seeds your HSA which is great, but something that covers more would be super nice.

Advice to Management

Read your own research on flexible work arrangements/technology approaches etc. Absolutely no reason we shouldn't have an actual CRM. Establish clear lines of communication about focus and approaches, and when thinking at a higher level shifts, tell the people executing that strategy.

Gartner seeds your HSA which is great, but something that covers more would be super nice.

July 31, 2019

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49 English questions out of 49