HP Inc. FAQ

All answers shown come directly from HP Inc. Reviews and are not edited or altered.

52 English questions out of 52

April 29, 2020

What are perks and other benefits like at HP Inc.?

Pros

Amazing people, Great culture, good benefits, lots of work perks, opportunities for growth, work/life balance

Cons

There is no company childcare center onsite

Advice to Management

Keep supporting and valuing the employees and implementing the HP way

Amazing people, Great culture, good benefits, lots of work perks, opportunities for growth, work/life balance

April 29, 2020

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December 11, 2020

What is health insurance like at HP Inc.?

Pros

Very good working environment Friendly workers

Cons

No working benefits. No good health insurance

No good health insurance

December 11, 2020

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September 3, 2018

Does HP Inc. pay for a gym membership?

Pros

Excellent place to work. Worked with a great team and it was an amazing opportunity.

Cons

If you're a contract employee you are not allowed to use the gym and exercise facilities. Contract employees generally excluded from most events.

If you're a contract employee you are not allowed to use the gym and exercise facilities.

September 3, 2018

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April 13, 2019

Does HP Inc. offer tuition reimbursement?

Pros

A strong desire for fairness and encouraging teamwork. Also, working around some very talented people encourages growth. For newer employess, HP can be a great learning opportunity working alongside these veterans. After about five years, it is usually time to move on to another company where you can have some assurance of more steady career paths. Upper management strives to provide solid financial stability to the company.

Cons

Upper management treats the workforce as interchangeable cost units that can be moved from country to country. This means that you can be layed off (WFR) at a moments notice regardless of how talented or how much you contribute to the company. The depersonalization is such that people are not really called people by management they are called TCOW's(total cost of workforce -- permanent) and RCOW's (resource cost of workforce -- contractors). When the word comes down from on high to cut your TCOWs you have to do so regardless of how good the people are that are working for you. As you read the reviews you will notice a very different set of reviews depending which country the review is from. Management creates quite a bit of PR about how they value talent within HP, but the lack of training and/or apprenticeship opportunities to develop people into new or changing roles is almost non-existent. It is pretty much limited to the occasional quarterly class on management processes or access to Linked-In learning. There is tuition reimbursement but it takes a serious commitment to a program before you can use it. It is clear that the stock holders greatly out-prioritize the work force.

Advice to Management

Start treating people as people again and not generic cost units.

There is tuition reimbursement but it takes a serious commitment to a program before you can use it.

April 13, 2019

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August 10, 2019

Does HP Inc. give bereavement leave?

Pros

1. People. Coworkers were almost always great. 2. Flexibility of work schedule. WFH and flexibility in working hours was great. 3. Pay. I’ve yet to get a job that pays me even 64% if what I made at HP. 4. Benefits Package. (PTO + insurance + retirement) 5. Company-provided equipment. (Laptops, monitors, etc) 6. Empathy and compassion from management (depending upon your individual manager) if something tragic or traumatic happens. After the death of a parent, my boss let me take four weeks of paid bereavement leave that didn’t come out of my PTO balance.

Cons

1. The culture created by management. You’re just a cog in the gargantuan HP machine. HP cares not about your hopes and dreams or your career advancement. Even if you push hard for something like mentorship, which is something they promote, your requests will likely be ignored or pushed aside. 2. Adherence to the bottom line creates job instability for employees. Sudden and unexpected layoff occur. I was “let go” and given fake reasons why. What it came down to was that I was laid off without HP calling it a lay-off so they didn’t have to report it, which would have been detrimental to the stock price. 3. If you get laid off or let go, you won’t see it coming. I had a one-on-one scheduled with my manager. As we were walking to find a conference room, we chatted like it was any other day. Just chitchat. Then we walked into a conference room in a different building and he immediately hit me with the news I was being let go. When I questioned why, he gave me a made up reason related to my performance. When I challenged him and told me he was incorrect, he fumbled over his words and gave me a different reason that was equally made up. 4. Lack of interaction with management. In the nearly five years I worked at HP, I can probably count on two hands the number of times I had real interaction (something beyond chitchat) with the two different managers for whom I worked. 5. Also, if you accept a severance package, as I did, you will never be eligible for rehire. EVER. After working for HP for 4 years and just shy of 11 months, my severance package was a half a month’s pay, but no one ever told me I’d never be able to come back and my severance paperwork never indicated as much, either. 6. Favoritism. This is definitely a problem. My first manager took the words of another person I worked with as the God’s honest truth when that person blamed me for a mistake she made. My manager never even asked me if I knew anything about the problem created by this other person. She just automatically assumed the problem arose because of me. I was told “you set us back weeks” after this other person mucked up some data she was analyzing for a new metric. This other person had asked me to look at the data and run a test, which I did exactly as she asked me to. I ran the test on literally 100 rows out of 100,000 rows for approximately 15 minutes and didn’t save anything. My second manager played favorites and I felt as if I had been “left behind” (for lack of a better term) while the other new hires I worked with were brought along much more quickly than I was. The other two new people on the team were given special treatment and paid special attention that I wasn’t. It helped if you were an athlete of some kind or if you liked mountain biking. That helped you “fit in” with the little clique created by my manager. Apparently I didn’t “fit in” because I didn’t join them on their mountain biking trek or their whitewater rafting trip one summer.

Advice to Management

Shift a lot of your focus from stakeholders to employees. You’ll be more successful in the long run. Open the lines of communication and help employees achieve success.

After the death of a parent, my boss let me take four weeks of paid bereavement leave that didn’t come out of my PTO balance.

August 10, 2019

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52 English questions out of 52