Noranda Aluminum Holding Career Development FAQ

Read what Noranda Aluminum Holding employees think about career development at the company. Employees have questions about everything from promotions and mentoring to job security.

Noranda Aluminum Holding has a career opportunities rating of 2.1.

All answers shown come directly from Noranda Aluminum Holding Reviews and are not edited or altered.

How are career development opportunities at Noranda Aluminum Holding?

2 English reviews out of 2

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June 30, 2021

Pros

Benefits are okay, but does not justify how low the pay is.

Cons

Extremely dangerous , poor management, extremely dirty, little to no training for new hires, hostile work environment, constant exposure to hazardous substances such as caustic, extremely outdated facility, little to no regard for safety(production is everything), understaffed, no work/life management, extreme lack of PPE and tools(if you can find tools there’s a good chance they’ll be broken), poor management of maintenance, and little to no room for advancement.

Advice to Management

Invest more into safety, training, and maintenance. Get rid of unreasonable policies(like the no phone policy for hourly employees), and hire management with more experience and know how. Also, adjust pay scale.

Extremely dangerous , poor management, extremely dirty, little to no training for new hires, hostile work environment, constant exposure to hazardous substances such as caustic, extremely outdated facility, little to no regard for safety(production is everything), understaffed, no work/life management, extreme lack of PPE and tools(if you can find tools there’s a good chance they’ll be broken), poor management of maintenance, and little to no room for advancement.

June 30, 2021

Reviewed by: Process Operator in Gramercy, LA (Former Employee)

June 19, 2019

Pros

Due to all the overtime you will have to work, there are opportunities to make a lot more money that whatever your base salary might be.

Cons

They can and will expect you to live out there at the facility. You might work 7 or more rotating 12 hour shifts in a row with MAYBE a half day off between starting the next 7 day marathon. The facility itself was built in the '50's and is falling apart since they struggle to hire and keep qualified craftsmen to keep the place intact. Caustic liquid sprays and drips everywhere. The 12 hour rotating shift is 4-4, so expect to always been tired. Hope you like waking up at 2:30 in the morning. This is basically a mud factory, so red dirt is everywhere, wet and dry. Expect to always have a layer of red dust on you, including the food you bring for lunch as well as you car out in the parking lot. They use lime dust in the process so expect to breath a lot of that it as it is blowing all over the place like a snowstorm. They say it doesn't cause cancer so I guess don't worry too much about that burning sensation you feel. Even though you are salaried management you will be expected to do physical labor. Expect to swing a sledgehammer to open giant valves or lift heavy objects up stairs and ladders. I was in the Army and this job was more physically demanding that my experience in the military, on average. They had a pension plan for the salaried personnel for many years then a few months after I got there they dumped it, so no more pension. Upper management doesn't trust lower management. Expect to be constantly spied on and micromanaged. Don't be surprised if the company VP emails you at 2 am on a Saturday to ask about some trivial thing. Hope you have a good answer though. Upper management is laser focused on finding scapegoats for any and all issues. They deny or ignore issues until they come to a head, then find someone low on the totem poll they can dump the blame upon. They love to "throw you under the bus". Even immediate supervisors or peer salaried employees will do this. Noranda Alumina is like a free for all reality TV how where people try to get each other kicked off. This is the culture they foster. You must LOOK and TRY to get someone else fired. If you are not, then YOU are failing. Stab each other in the back. Training is very poor, as most of the experience people have fled for been forced out. You are expected to basically hit the ground running and know everything. Production supervisors are expected to have strong mechanical knowledge and basically guide mechanics on how to do their job. As I said, most of the employees who have real knowledge are long gone so good luck. You are also supervising Union employees, who, at least in operations, tend to lack any sense of urgency. Many are out of shape men in their 50's+ who remember a time when Noranda Alumina was owned by someone else and more laid back. So getting them to move at the pace now expected is a challenge. If you do a good job there will be no recognition. But if you make one little mistake then upper management will not hesitate to send out an email blast letting god and country know you made a mistake.

Advice to Management

Firstly, upper management needs ease off. STOP micromanaging. Stop trying to make the focus of the job to be about firing everyone. I spent a year in Afghanistan and was far less stressed there than I was working at Noranada. At Noranda there is no teamwork. Stop trying to divide people. Stop acting like Noranda is the only place in the world to work. You need to revive morale in the plant because it is dead. Most people who work there do so because they have been there so long they can't do anything else. Everyone else has come and gone.

If you do a good job there will be no recognition.

June 19, 2019

Reviewed by: Production Shift Supervisor in Gramercy, LA (Former Employee)

2 English reviews out of 2

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