Nuna FAQ

Have questions about working at Nuna? Read answers to frequently asked questions to help you make a choice before applying to a job or accepting a job offer.

Whether it's about compensation and benefits, culture and diversity, or you're curious to know more about the work environment, find out from employees what it's like to work at Nuna.

All answers shown come directly from Nuna Reviews and are not edited or altered.

24 English questions out of 24

February 5, 2020

What are perks and other benefits like at Nuna?

Pros

- Lots of room for growth -Amazing mission - Lots of opportunities to work on various projects - Flexible WFH -Unlimited PTO -Catered Lunch everyday -Fitness Reimbursement -Lots of perks -Great Benefits

Cons

-A lot can be put on your plate if you don't speak up about it (but that goes for any startup - you just need to set boundaries for yourself)

Lots of perks

February 5, 2020

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August 19, 2019

What is health insurance like at Nuna?

Pros

I have worked closely with Nuna Leadership for the past five years in an administrative/operations capacity. The wonderful thing about working at startups, and at Nuna in particular, is all the opportunities to step up to the plate, get involved, and show the great work you can do. I’ve had the opportunity to pitch in and learn about so many things that are above and beyond the day-to-day administrative scope, which is a definite career builder! At no other company, or role, that I’ve had in my 20 plus years administrative career have I felt my voice was as heard as it is at Nuna, nor have I felt that I was able to have as much of a positive impact as I have at Nuna. Administrative professionals at Nuna are respected and able to have great positive impact company-wide. At one of my past administrative roles, the manager of the administrative team would refer to the team as, “her girls” which, as an adult woman of the age where I could have adult children, always made me cringe. In that role, at the team meetings led by our manager, conversations were focused around what diet worked, or where to get your nails done, rather than business updates, discussions about new productivity tools, or new processes. I feel none of that attitude at Nuna. At Nuna, we are respected professionals who are experts in our field and are treated as such. In the United States, we spend trillions of dollars every year on healthcare. Nuna is developing tools that will help plans and providers succeed in value-based payment arrangements and change the way healthcare is paid for. I’m proud to be working for a woman-led company that is taking on this challenging work.

Cons

It took a while to find product/market fit. Now that we've accomplished this we are off to the races!

Advice to Management

Continue to treat administrative roles as partners and professionals as the company grows/scales.

based payment arrangements and change the way healthcare is paid for.

August 19, 2019

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February 5, 2020

What is paid time off like at Nuna?

Pros

- Lots of room for growth -Amazing mission - Lots of opportunities to work on various projects - Flexible WFH -Unlimited PTO -Catered Lunch everyday -Fitness Reimbursement -Lots of perks -Great Benefits

Cons

-A lot can be put on your plate if you don't speak up about it (but that goes for any startup - you just need to set boundaries for yourself)

Unlimited PTO

February 5, 2020

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September 27, 2019

How are senior leaders perceived at Nuna?

Pros

Nuna has a socially important mission – to make healthcare more affordable and accessible, on a large scale. Nuna has indeed demonstrated some successes in this area, for instance, they introduced modern cloud computing methodologies to the large, stodgy institutions that control healthcare, including the Medicaid administration. Jini Kim, the CEO, is very charismatic and has managed to introduce some SV tech culture into the normally dull and buttoned-down domain of healthcare insurance analytics. Nuna has good financial backing and as a result has been able to make large-scale sales to government and big insurers, that is, to large conservative institutions that normally wouldn't dream of dealing with a young startup. Nuna put a lot of emphasis on having a compassionate and progressive culture, on inclusion and diversity and personal growth. This is mostly a plus but see below.

Cons

While Nuna is a mission-driven company, the actual mission is disguised under a cloud of self-righteous rhetoric like “every row of data is a life” (an oft-repeated company slogan which typifies the empty virtue signalling). Despite the loud devotion to compassion and helping sick people, Nuna is not in the health-care delivery business or anything close to it, but rather the cost containment business. Their customers are organizations that spend a lot of money on health care; the service Nuna provides is to help reduce that spend or make it more effective. There՚s nothing wrong with that – helping keep health care spending under control is a perfectly useful thing to do, but it՚s not very inspiring. It՚s far removed from the actual practice of medical care, and thus not really the kind of thing that deserves any special recognition for compassion, any more than an insurer like Blue Cross does. It՚s a business. And Nuna is not alone in this business, there are quite a few bigger and more established companies in this space (such as Optum and Truven, now part of IBM). Nuna՚s advantages against these competitors are minimal, mostly rooted in having more Silicon Valley cachet. Putting health care data in the cloud was innovative a few years ago, now there are a great many people doing it. Nuna՚s cachet enables it to attract some talented engineers, but it doesn՚t really know what to do with them.. There՚s very little interesting engineering innovation happening at Nuna; the data science is competent but nothing special as far as I can tell. The big technical innovation that drove the company originally was heavy use of AWS, but that is no longer much of a distinguisher. Unlike some of these older companies, Nuna is hobbled by restrictive data agreements that limit the uses they can make of all the data coming through their system – that is a serious business risk, especially given machine learning՚s need for massive datasets. If Nuna can՚t combine their customers data, scaling the business will not scale their ML capabilities accordingly. The data that Nuna does handle is limited to insurance billing records, and this too is pretty far removed from the actual practice of healthcare or the advancement of medical science. This may have changed since I was there, certainly there was talk of making use of EHR-level data, but again, Nuna has very little connection to the practice of medicine and probably wouldn't know what to do with data like that. Culturally Nuna has a serious problem in hyper-political-correctness. Diversity is one thing (and something Nuna does very well); but constant pledges of fealty to approved values are something else again. Many companies do this now to some extent but Nuna takes it to extremes, to the extent that it can create an oppressive atmosphere and alienate people in the name of inclusion. In part because of this, Nuna has had trouble retaining senior engineers, and there is very little in the way of coherent technical leadership. There are serious gaps in technical strategy -- perhaps because management is focused on other things. In short, Nuna is a good place if you care most about diversity, and want to spend a lot of mental energy on things like making sure nobody uses words like "guys" for a mixed-gender group. It is not a very good place if you value creativity, innovation, or learning. And if you really care about improving health care you should probably work on that directly, not on better analytics for payers.

Advice to Management

Back up the virtue signalling with some actual innovation.

Jini Kim, the CEO, is very charismatic and has managed to introduce some SV tech culture into the normally dull and buttoned

September 27, 2019

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April 29, 2019

What are some insights into the strategy or vision at Nuna?

Pros

Nuna is a strongly mission-driven company, and as a result attracts a great group of people to work with. I consistently had very positive experiences with all my coworkers, and learned and grew quite a lot from everybody I worked with on a day-to-day basis. Nuna's mission is also very inspiring, especially if you're on a well-staffed team working on a product that has traction.

Cons

The root of all of Nuna's problems is that it has bad and unfocused leadership. Nowhere is this more evident than in its amorphous product strategy. During my tenure at Nuna (which lasted over a year), there was a massive amount of product churn. Every year leadership would decide on a new direction and a new flagship product for the company, while simultaneously paying lip service to the importance of every other product/team. Predictably, all other products/teams would gradually hemorrhage resources, and would either go down in flames, be killed, or continue along in a zombie state indefinitely. To be fair, the health insurer market is a tough nut to crack, but this constant product/strategy churn is endless, demoralizing, and self-defeating. Nuna's leadership was consistently not upfront about what was deprioritized and what was on the chopping block. There was a high rate of burnout on neglected teams, usually due to understaffing and dishonesty. When leadership made tough decisions, they usually made them too late and in a very cowardly manner. I've been at all-hands meetings where leadership have announced offhandedly that teams/products will be dissolved without even saying thanks to the team or acknowledging the mistakes leadership made. Its unbelievable. Until Nuna can either find focus on one product or completely change their leadership, I cannot recommend it as a good place to work.

Every year leadership would decide on a new direction and a new flagship product for the company, while simultaneously paying lip service to the importance of every other product/team.

April 29, 2019

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24 English questions out of 24