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Penske Media

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Penske Media Culture FAQ

Read what Penske Media employees think about their company culture and make sure it is the right fit for you.

Penske Media has a culture and values rating of 4.

All answers shown come directly from Penske Media Reviews and are not edited or altered.

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3 English questions out of 3

March 23, 2021

What is the company culture at Penske Media?

Pros

Our CEO, Jay Penske Great staff Thoughtful policies

Cons

There are no cons that come to mind other than I would love to see more work from home flexibility after the situation with Covid improves. I feel more productive and less stressed without a daily commute.

Advice to Management

Consider at least a partial work from home policy for those employees who are able to do their jobs successfully from home.

There are no cons that come to mind other than I would love to see more work from home flexibility after the situation with Covid improves.

March 23, 2021

See 23 more answers

July 27, 2022

How was the interview at Penske Media?

Pros

- Impressive legacy media brands - Interesting potential opportunities (not currently being capitalized on)

Cons

Starting a new business role at PMC seemed like an amazing opportunity to guide legendary media brands into new digital and streaming ecosystems, though as great as the opportunity was, the bloom was off the rose almost immediately. The parent company and individual brands are very siloed; there are legitimate reasons for the divide, however the way it is implemented feels sloppy and piecemeal and not to the benefit of the company. Due to the siloing, hybrid environment and split of the company between east and west coast offices, I had no colleagues or employees to regularly work with or speak to (about company culture/onboarding, etc.) other than my direct manager. My manager seemed like a personally kind and compassionate person but was the worst executive I have worked with across a half dozen companies over 15+ yrs. Counterintuitively, they managed to simultaneously micromanage me and harshly criticize me for asking fundamental questions—one as simple as confirming I should use a Google sheet instead of an excel doc when all other work I’d done up to that point had been in excel. I was given virtually no autonomy but also criticized for not taking initiative. When I took initiative there was invariably a mistake like leaving one track change in a draft document that was still a work in progress or contacting someone at a company that another division already had a relationship with (despite not having any briefing on current partners). I was criticized for asking basic questions during my first week onboarding while simultaneously chastised for not already having all the correct software installed on my computer. And to reiterate, there were no teammates or co-workers to regularly confer with during the first week of onboarding, just a manager who told me they were too busy to answer questions and their biggest pet peeve was having to repeat themself/clarify directions—literally my first week in this hybrid office with no other teammates or employees to go to for guidance. My experience at PMC was a nightmare due to the criticism and lack of direction which led to a constant fear of making mistakes or asking a question that would be considered dumb leading to harsh and sustained criticism via slack. This tense environment led me to make a number of trivial and frankly dumb mistakes due to the constant low level anxiety l felt. The icing on the cake, though, and what confirmed that I made the right decision by resigning, was when the manager called a meeting with HR to “fire” me the day after I had resigned. My manager and I had a phone conversation on a Thursday morning where I said I thought it was best for me to leave—they agreed—and then that night I received a text message (not slack) telling me that *surprise* "I still worked for the company." The next day I discovered that this was just so I could attend a meeting to officially be fired in front of HR—presumably to make the manager look better than having their recent hire of two months resign. Something to note: another person on the same team abruptly quit the week I started at the company after being there about seven months. I am clearly not the only person under this manager who was driven away by their management style. On the surface the company seems very cool—with a lot of growth potential and a seemingly very progressive work culture and initiatives pushed out by HR (though I wasn’t there long enough to confirm). However, in addition to my unsustainable experience with my manager, interactions with other executives in the New York office were generally cold as well. From my brief time there--in office three days per week over two months--I got the impression that the singular priority for leaders were quarterly profits, hence hitting bonuses. There seemed to be zero consideration given to long term health and growth of the company or quality of the relationships, partners and content that would be representing PMC publications and events to the public. I would not advise potential employees to reject the company solely based on my incredibly negative experience, though I would caution two things 1) Make sure you have a thorough conversation with your hiring manager during the interview process and ascertain their management style and priorities and ask yourself if that is comparable with your needs. If I had successfully done that I would have saved myself some serious trauma. 2) This manager and NY office environment have thrived at the company, so while I do think my experience can be attributed to a bad apple it does lead you to ask how this bad apple has thrived at PMC considering their harsh style and despite having multiple people on their team quit abruptly within about 9 months of each other.

Advice to Management

- Adequately support employees particularly in the on-boarding period. - Encourage relationships between employees on the same team or related divisions despite remote working environments, ie team meetings so that communication and strategic knowledge is shared for mutual benefit both professional and personal (these ties can allow team members to have other avenues into company practices besides a single relationship with their manager.) - Be patient with employees who ask questions. - Self-access treatment of employees and whether your management style is helpful or hurtful to your team's objectives. - Invite feedback on management style if applicable. And be flexible. - Internally review leader's relationships with their subordinates and access whether they are good representatives for the company both internally and externally. Take action if needed.

I would not advise potential employees to reject the company solely based on my incredibly negative experience, though I would caution two things 1) Make sure you have a thorough conversation with your hiring manager during the interview process and ascertain their management style and priorities and ask yourself if that is comparable with your needs.

July 27, 2022

See answer

July 27, 2022

What is the hiring process like at Penske Media?

Pros

- Impressive legacy media brands - Interesting potential opportunities (not currently being capitalized on)

Cons

Starting a new business role at PMC seemed like an amazing opportunity to guide legendary media brands into new digital and streaming ecosystems, though as great as the opportunity was, the bloom was off the rose almost immediately. The parent company and individual brands are very siloed; there are legitimate reasons for the divide, however the way it is implemented feels sloppy and piecemeal and not to the benefit of the company. Due to the siloing, hybrid environment and split of the company between east and west coast offices, I had no colleagues or employees to regularly work with or speak to (about company culture/onboarding, etc.) other than my direct manager. My manager seemed like a personally kind and compassionate person but was the worst executive I have worked with across a half dozen companies over 15+ yrs. Counterintuitively, they managed to simultaneously micromanage me and harshly criticize me for asking fundamental questions—one as simple as confirming I should use a Google sheet instead of an excel doc when all other work I’d done up to that point had been in excel. I was given virtually no autonomy but also criticized for not taking initiative. When I took initiative there was invariably a mistake like leaving one track change in a draft document that was still a work in progress or contacting someone at a company that another division already had a relationship with (despite not having any briefing on current partners). I was criticized for asking basic questions during my first week onboarding while simultaneously chastised for not already having all the correct software installed on my computer. And to reiterate, there were no teammates or co-workers to regularly confer with during the first week of onboarding, just a manager who told me they were too busy to answer questions and their biggest pet peeve was having to repeat themself/clarify directions—literally my first week in this hybrid office with no other teammates or employees to go to for guidance. My experience at PMC was a nightmare due to the criticism and lack of direction which led to a constant fear of making mistakes or asking a question that would be considered dumb leading to harsh and sustained criticism via slack. This tense environment led me to make a number of trivial and frankly dumb mistakes due to the constant low level anxiety l felt. The icing on the cake, though, and what confirmed that I made the right decision by resigning, was when the manager called a meeting with HR to “fire” me the day after I had resigned. My manager and I had a phone conversation on a Thursday morning where I said I thought it was best for me to leave—they agreed—and then that night I received a text message (not slack) telling me that *surprise* "I still worked for the company." The next day I discovered that this was just so I could attend a meeting to officially be fired in front of HR—presumably to make the manager look better than having their recent hire of two months resign. Something to note: another person on the same team abruptly quit the week I started at the company after being there about seven months. I am clearly not the only person under this manager who was driven away by their management style. On the surface the company seems very cool—with a lot of growth potential and a seemingly very progressive work culture and initiatives pushed out by HR (though I wasn’t there long enough to confirm). However, in addition to my unsustainable experience with my manager, interactions with other executives in the New York office were generally cold as well. From my brief time there--in office three days per week over two months--I got the impression that the singular priority for leaders were quarterly profits, hence hitting bonuses. There seemed to be zero consideration given to long term health and growth of the company or quality of the relationships, partners and content that would be representing PMC publications and events to the public. I would not advise potential employees to reject the company solely based on my incredibly negative experience, though I would caution two things 1) Make sure you have a thorough conversation with your hiring manager during the interview process and ascertain their management style and priorities and ask yourself if that is comparable with your needs. If I had successfully done that I would have saved myself some serious trauma. 2) This manager and NY office environment have thrived at the company, so while I do think my experience can be attributed to a bad apple it does lead you to ask how this bad apple has thrived at PMC considering their harsh style and despite having multiple people on their team quit abruptly within about 9 months of each other.

Advice to Management

- Adequately support employees particularly in the on-boarding period. - Encourage relationships between employees on the same team or related divisions despite remote working environments, ie team meetings so that communication and strategic knowledge is shared for mutual benefit both professional and personal (these ties can allow team members to have other avenues into company practices besides a single relationship with their manager.) - Be patient with employees who ask questions. - Self-access treatment of employees and whether your management style is helpful or hurtful to your team's objectives. - Invite feedback on management style if applicable. And be flexible. - Internally review leader's relationships with their subordinates and access whether they are good representatives for the company both internally and externally. Take action if needed.

I would not advise potential employees to reject the company solely based on my incredibly negative experience, though I would caution two things 1) Make sure you have a thorough conversation with your hiring manager during the interview process and ascertain their management style and priorities and ask yourself if that is comparable with your needs.

July 27, 2022

See answer

3 English questions out of 3

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