PoolCorp FAQ

All answers shown come directly from PoolCorp Reviews and are not edited or altered.

17 English questions out of 17

June 18, 2018

What is health insurance like at PoolCorp?

Pros

A lot of room for advancement and bonuses if you're in sales. On the job training and Blue Cross health insurance. 40 hours a week annually.

Cons

Jealousy among coworkers if you're in the MIT program. A lot to learn if you have no experience in the pool industry.

Advice to Management

Managers throughout the company are doing an outstanding job. Continue to keep leading by example.

On the job training and Blue Cross health insurance.

June 18, 2018

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January 4, 2019

Does PoolCorp offer relocation assistance?

Pros

- Good pay for employees at MIT level and up - a lot of company paid travel within the first 6 months only. - no micromanaging - company relocation ( which you have to pay back if you quit in two years)

Cons

- prepare to work 50+ hour weeks minimum with no overtime upon completing the program. - VERY blue collar environment which the recruiting team doesn’t express when hiring you. - prepare to work in the blazing heat or freezing cold in the winter times. - aggressive company culture which encourages racial discrimination and homophobia - lazy sales team - if you choose operations know the company only cares about sales and operations managers will be paid less and receive less benefits. - huge disconnect between corporate and MIT Trainers with the sales centers you’ll actually work in. - don’t expect to get a corporate position out of this

Advice to Management

- the company culture sucks and is damn near abusive work on that - Be transparent about this job especially when recruiting college graduates who are looking for something less blue collar - don’t pigeon hole MIT’s to go operations or sales with no room for crossover. - lessen the disconnect between the corporate level and and down

- company relocation ( which you have to pay back if you quit in two years)

January 4, 2019

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June 27, 2018

How are senior leaders perceived at PoolCorp?

Pros

Worked in the field and at the corporate office for multiple years. There are advantages and disadvantages for both. I had a good career here and left on good terms for significantly more money. Corporate: - You aren't really held accountable. You can suck at your job and they'll continue to move you to different positions until your impact is marginalized. I saw many people that had grown complacent with mediocrity, but were never held to a higher standard. - The attitude is very relaxed. People wear business casual. The pace of work and progress is slow. I attribute this to Louisiana culture, paying people less and getting lower quality in return, and the fact that it's the pool industry (not military or medical equipment, etc). - MIT program gives new college grads a softer landing pad for the real world. I personally enjoyed going into a competitive training program. Most people that do this have a flaw in their resume and use this company as a stepping stone for something bigger and better (myself and most of my classmates included). - You grow pretty close with your MIT class. I still chat with them even though we've moved on. -The people are generally good people. There are some hostile jerks, but 85% of the people there are well intentioned. - Stock is performing really well. Ultimately, this is the only thing that matters at this company. - The company often hires people that aren't fully qualified for their role and trains them. This is a benefit if you're trying to get into another line of work or different career path. - Management at the top is very sharp. Every VP and C level has earned their role and are good at it. Director level is where things start to get mediocre. Field: - Active job. Constantly on your feet. - They'll hire people with unconventional backgrounds and train them. The pool industry is a lifestyle. The industry requires you to sit out in the sun with chemical stained clothes, so it only attracts certain kinds of people. - If you end up in a good/growing market with a capable team, you'll make bank. - Some of the best pool industry talent in the entire industry. A lot of the people in the field are the studs of the pool industry. Notes on pool industry: - It's small. Really. - They drink like fish. - There's a lot of low quality pool people that bring the rest of the industry down. There isn't a great solution out there for this.

Cons

- Penny pinching, short term incentivized culture. This is primarily driven by the CFO downward, but you can see its repercussions throughout the business. Basically, the entire company is heavily incentivized on one results. This leads to accruing significant management debt (kicking problems down the road), understaffing, and getting lower quality people because they won't pay what the market will. - Pay less than market wages and benefits: that's why people are complacent with mediocrity or move on to other things. If you make this argument to HR or attempt to negotiate, things get hostile... but the numbers and employee turnover rate don't lie. - Don't invest in technology or systems: the company uses an ERP that was created 40 years ago. You only learn it through rote memorization. They're hesitant to put their money where their mouth is when it comes to technology. They pick the cheapest platforms (in basically every business unit) and accept the problems and limitations. - Over-promoted managers: there's several managers that were promoted to positions because they were simply the last person standing. They are not good at their jobs and hinder progress, but I was not confident they'd ever be held accountable. - Age bias for managers: you have to be at least 30 to be consider for any manager position here. There's an unspoken age bias. It's not a big deal though, because of the next point. - Not prepared for the next generations workforce: they have like 5-10 people at the corporate office that are in their 20s. They don't care to hire/retain young people unless it's for the MIT program. - Don't promote from within for high level positions: this is probably a good thing, but they hire externally when they need a high level position field. Field: -Log jam of capable managers: I saw tons of markets where the branch managers were qualified to be regional managers, but the regional managers were making bank and not remotely close to retirement age (and also didn't have opportunities for advancement). Talented people leave because there isn't a great opportunity to move up. -Way too many incapable managers: there are lots of branch managers that don't care. They'll sit in their office, leave early, won't engage the customers, etc... but never held accountable. -Sales focused: they promote sales people to management roles more than operations people. There's a general emphasis on sales more than anything. They will rarely fire customers, even if the business is unprofitable. -Horizon business model doesn't make sense given the market needs and competition. Are we retail? are we B2B? who cares! we try to do retail and B2B at the same time and end up being average at both.

Advice to Management

The company continually acquires management debt by incentivizing short term performance. We didn' t invest in systems and rarely in people. It's a model that's doomed for failure unless changed (thanks to Amazon and the internet), but it's all masked by the fact that the stock is performing well. If you invest in systems and more talented people, you can do more with less, instead of throwing underqualified head count at problems.

-Way too many incapable managers: there are lots of branch managers that don't care.

June 27, 2018

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June 27, 2018

How are career development opportunities at PoolCorp?

Pros

Worked in the field and at the corporate office for multiple years. There are advantages and disadvantages for both. I had a good career here and left on good terms for significantly more money. Corporate: - You aren't really held accountable. You can suck at your job and they'll continue to move you to different positions until your impact is marginalized. I saw many people that had grown complacent with mediocrity, but were never held to a higher standard. - The attitude is very relaxed. People wear business casual. The pace of work and progress is slow. I attribute this to Louisiana culture, paying people less and getting lower quality in return, and the fact that it's the pool industry (not military or medical equipment, etc). - MIT program gives new college grads a softer landing pad for the real world. I personally enjoyed going into a competitive training program. Most people that do this have a flaw in their resume and use this company as a stepping stone for something bigger and better (myself and most of my classmates included). - You grow pretty close with your MIT class. I still chat with them even though we've moved on. -The people are generally good people. There are some hostile jerks, but 85% of the people there are well intentioned. - Stock is performing really well. Ultimately, this is the only thing that matters at this company. - The company often hires people that aren't fully qualified for their role and trains them. This is a benefit if you're trying to get into another line of work or different career path. - Management at the top is very sharp. Every VP and C level has earned their role and are good at it. Director level is where things start to get mediocre. Field: - Active job. Constantly on your feet. - They'll hire people with unconventional backgrounds and train them. The pool industry is a lifestyle. The industry requires you to sit out in the sun with chemical stained clothes, so it only attracts certain kinds of people. - If you end up in a good/growing market with a capable team, you'll make bank. - Some of the best pool industry talent in the entire industry. A lot of the people in the field are the studs of the pool industry. Notes on pool industry: - It's small. Really. - They drink like fish. - There's a lot of low quality pool people that bring the rest of the industry down. There isn't a great solution out there for this.

Cons

- Penny pinching, short term incentivized culture. This is primarily driven by the CFO downward, but you can see its repercussions throughout the business. Basically, the entire company is heavily incentivized on one results. This leads to accruing significant management debt (kicking problems down the road), understaffing, and getting lower quality people because they won't pay what the market will. - Pay less than market wages and benefits: that's why people are complacent with mediocrity or move on to other things. If you make this argument to HR or attempt to negotiate, things get hostile... but the numbers and employee turnover rate don't lie. - Don't invest in technology or systems: the company uses an ERP that was created 40 years ago. You only learn it through rote memorization. They're hesitant to put their money where their mouth is when it comes to technology. They pick the cheapest platforms (in basically every business unit) and accept the problems and limitations. - Over-promoted managers: there's several managers that were promoted to positions because they were simply the last person standing. They are not good at their jobs and hinder progress, but I was not confident they'd ever be held accountable. - Age bias for managers: you have to be at least 30 to be consider for any manager position here. There's an unspoken age bias. It's not a big deal though, because of the next point. - Not prepared for the next generations workforce: they have like 5-10 people at the corporate office that are in their 20s. They don't care to hire/retain young people unless it's for the MIT program. - Don't promote from within for high level positions: this is probably a good thing, but they hire externally when they need a high level position field. Field: -Log jam of capable managers: I saw tons of markets where the branch managers were qualified to be regional managers, but the regional managers were making bank and not remotely close to retirement age (and also didn't have opportunities for advancement). Talented people leave because there isn't a great opportunity to move up. -Way too many incapable managers: there are lots of branch managers that don't care. They'll sit in their office, leave early, won't engage the customers, etc... but never held accountable. -Sales focused: they promote sales people to management roles more than operations people. There's a general emphasis on sales more than anything. They will rarely fire customers, even if the business is unprofitable. -Horizon business model doesn't make sense given the market needs and competition. Are we retail? are we B2B? who cares! we try to do retail and B2B at the same time and end up being average at both.

Advice to Management

The company continually acquires management debt by incentivizing short term performance. We didn' t invest in systems and rarely in people. It's a model that's doomed for failure unless changed (thanks to Amazon and the internet), but it's all masked by the fact that the stock is performing well. If you invest in systems and more talented people, you can do more with less, instead of throwing underqualified head count at problems.

I had a good career here and left on good terms for significantly more money.

June 27, 2018

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June 14, 2019

What kind of career opportunities exist at PoolCorp?

Pros

The company is incredibly successful and growing rapidly. That leads to lots of opportunity for promotions and job changes to push your career forward.

Cons

It is fast paced and challenging. Some people can find the pace too much.

That leads to lots of opportunity for promotions and job changes to push your career forward.

June 14, 2019

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17 English questions out of 17