Research Square Company FAQ

Have questions about working at Research Square Company? Read answers to frequently asked questions to help you make a choice before applying to a job or accepting a job offer.

Whether it's about compensation and benefits, culture and diversity, or you're curious to know more about the work environment, find out from employees what it's like to work at Research Square Company.

All answers shown come directly from Research Square Company Reviews and are not edited or altered.

39 English questions out of 39

February 23, 2021

What are perks and other benefits like at Research Square Company?

Pros

Amazing people, good flexibility, fantastic benefits

Cons

Low salary (for needing a graduate degree), remote communication could be improved, heavy workload

Amazing people, good flexibility, fantastic benefits

February 23, 2021

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July 23, 2019

What is health insurance like at Research Square Company?

Pros

*Customer-focused mission to improve scientific communication *Flexibility in my daily schedule * Family-friendly workplace *Good health benefits and open sick leave policy *Fantastic colleagues *Strong remote culture *Recognition of employees

Cons

*Can be challenging for folks who are new to remote work and aren't self-motivated to be disciplined with their work *Always looking to improve processes (a good thing!), which results in change being the norm. Must be able to adapt to continuous change.

Good health benefits and open sick leave policy

July 23, 2019

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December 12, 2020

Does Research Square Company offer tuition reimbursement?

Pros

Working from home is a major plus. Part-time folks avoid the burnout that is experienced by most of the full-timers. Time off is extremely generous and wonderful, especially for parents. Culture is great, though I have heard whispers that it is starting to trend in a negative direction. I have not personally experienced anything like that yet.

Cons

The pay is very low, considering the workload, education required, and difficulty level. The hours per week are based on a 3000wph editing speed for the lower-level edits and a 2150wph speed for the more in-depth edits, which is honestly very high for most of the papers. It's difficult to reach that speed while maintaining the required quality. This, work weeks for full timers (said to be 40 hour weeks) generally are closer to 50-55 hrs, while part timers might work around 25-30 hours a week (meant to be 20 hour work weeks).

Advice to Management

Lighten the workload a bit. Most of the folks that work there are ok with the pay, but would love to be able to spend more time editing for their customers. Set a more realistic wph benchmark that is based on a more generalized sample of employees rather than the fastest editors.

The pay is very low, considering the workload, education required, and difficulty level.

December 12, 2020

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November 6, 2019

Does Research Square Company offer an employee assistance or workplace counselling program?

Pros

Flexible hours Good compensation Easy-to-use UI Timely feedback on assignments if issues arise

Cons

Contract employees not eligible for health benefits

Contract employees not eligible for health benefits

November 6, 2019

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September 27, 2020

Does Research Square Company offer unlimited time off?

Pros

Research Square has a wonderful community of intelligent, kind and quirky former academics who are very passionate about what they do. Even better, RS has managed to cultivate an atmosphere where the competitiveness of the academic sphere has morphed into a true collegiality and a collective desire to promote knowledge transmission rather than personal agendas or careers. I have never had a negative interaction with a coworker, and many have gone out of their way to be helpful and to provide advice. The benefits are really good (in my opinion), and include an extremely generous sick time policy, full holidays and good PTO. The HR department is very nice and willing to answer questions, and the company has been transparent and understanding during the COVID-19 crisis. Employees routinely take sick time to care for ill children or family members, which is not just tolerated but encouraged. The fully remote nature of the company has also always been wonderful.

Cons

The amount of work that is required of a full time editor is a huge problem. Editors are expected to do 36 hours of editing per week in addition to meetings and reading feedback, and every second of editing work requires immense focus. For contrast, according to current data, most office workers have about 3 productive hours per day. Very efficient workers have about 5 hours per day of productive work. As an Academic Editor, you will be required to do over 7 hours of “don’t talk to me, I’m concentrating” work every single day. To compound the problem, many of the tasks are designed to take a certain amount of time, but can take much longer. You do not get credit for extra time spent on top of the allocated 7 hours, even if it was necessary to make a paper meet quality targets. I think that most people don’t understand what I mean when I explain this: “well, yeah, all jobs expect you to work 40 hours!” In reality, I would estimate that I spend about 55 hours on work most weeks. Breaks are absolutely necessary if you want to maintain good editing quality (and avoid burnout), but they are not payed. If you get up to pee, that’s on your time. Most of my coworkers don’t take true lunch breaks, even though everyone works from home. I work every evening, and I usually fit in editing on both Saturday and Sunday. At one point, I started having panic attacks at my desk about twice per week. Because of our generous sick time, I was able to take time off and use the EAP to seek counseling. I would rather just have reasonable work hours. An additional problem is that there is very little room for advancement in the editing division at Research Square. If you apply to be an Academic Editor, it is not likely that you will move to a different role within the first three years of the position. Many of the managers are well-established, enjoy their jobs and are unlikely to leave. Do not take this position with the idea that you will be able to move laterally or vertically within the company. For many employees, this isn’t a problem: people want stable employment with decent (although unimpressive) pay that isn’t geographically limiting. There are employees that seem to enjoy Research Square. Many (many!) editors leave within the first year, but others seem happy to stay for 5 or 10 years, and regularly sing the company’s praises on in-company messaging platforms. Even though I love the company’s mission and the people, I would have strong reservations about recommending this position to anyone based on the hours and stress. If you are considering a position as an Academic Editor at Research Square, here are a few questions that you should ask yourself. These questions aren’t intended to be negative; they simply reflect the reality of the position in its current form, which may be fine for some people and less so for others: - Do I mind working evenings? - Do I mind working weekends? - Would the ability to set my own schedule be freeing or stressful for me? Would it be be beneficial to my lifestyle or my family if I were able to work a non-traditional (not 9-5) schedule? - Do I need a generous sick time/parental leave policy? - Do I feel that I can work more than 40 hours per week and maintain my mental health? Do I feel that I could work 50-60 hours per week and maintain my mental health? - Am I nimble enough to keep up with changing policies and continuous feedback? - Do I mind continuous oversight and monitoring of my work? - Do I enjoy editing? Will I continue to enjoy editing if I do so for 8+ hours per day? - Am I comfortable learning to edit on papers that might be tangential to my chosen field? - Do I enjoy/feel comfortable interacting in a remote setting? Would I enjoy working in a setting where I have one main point of contact (my manager)? - Do I feel comfortable sitting at a computer for more than 8 hours per day? - Am I looking for a position with many opportunities for advancement? Would I be happy in a position with few advancement opportunities but a reasonable yearly pay raise?

Advice to Management

Work/life balance is a necessity, and it should be treated like one. Pushing your employees to their physical limits based on data that suggests it is “possible” for editors to do more isn’t just bad management—it’s costing you skilled employees who actually like your company. This is not new information; employees have been saying for years that the working conditions are too strenuous, and nothing has changed. Prioritize your people.

The benefits are really good (in my opinion), and include an extremely generous sick time policy, full holidays and good PTO.

September 27, 2020

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39 English questions out of 39

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