Talkspace FAQ

Have questions about working at Talkspace? Read answers to frequently asked questions to help you make a choice before applying to a job or accepting a job offer.

Whether it's about compensation and benefits, culture and diversity, or you're curious to know more about the work environment, find out from employees what it's like to work at Talkspace.

All answers shown come directly from Talkspace Reviews and are not edited or altered.

34 English questions out of 34

March 10, 2021

What are perks and other benefits like at Talkspace?

Pros

I have only recently joined the team, and so this is a review based primarily on early impressions, but so far I have to say I am thoroughly impressed by the culture, the organizational efficiency, strong leadership, and frankly, an overwhelming abundance of kindness and positivity from everyone I've met so far. The company is growing extremely rapidly, making it an exciting place to work. The company is working hard to continually serve their therapists as well as their end-users; many of the other product and sales staff are themselves practicing therapists, and possess an in-depth knowledge of their trade. The product is actually incredible, and after trying it myself (all employees receive a free subscription), I'm totally bought in to the benefits of online therapy, and believe the platform represents the future of mental healthcare.

Cons

I admit that I was initially concerned by some of the other low reviews, but upon closer examination, many (most?) of those appear to be written by part-time therapists, many of whom have a very short interaction with the platform, rather than full-time employees. Talkspace has been growing extremely rapidly, and any startup undergoing such rapid growth that is also managing a vast network of 1099 contractors (their therapists) is inevitably going to solicit some unfortunate reviews. Overall, while the company has had its share of growing pains, I'm very impressed so far, and excited to be part of such a dynamic team working toward a mission that is deeply important to so many.

The product is actually incredible, and after trying it myself (all employees receive a free subscription), I'm totally bought in to the benefits of online therapy, and believe the platform represents the future of mental healthcare.

March 10, 2021

See 10 more answers

October 25, 2019

What is health insurance like at Talkspace?

Pros

You can work from home.

Cons

Talkspace used to be a nice side gig. You can't really thrive financially if this is your FT job, and it can be very draining when you have a high caseload. Even though Talkspace has increased subscription prices for clients and increased pay in June for therapists, we are still paid much less than 50% of what TS charges clients. Clients with the basic monthly subscription pay $65/week. The therapist gets about $23.12/week per client; we're paid less than that if the client is paying quarterly or biannually. Clients can require the therapist to respond within certain timeframes/deadlines 3 times per day at a certain minimum word count. If the therapist misses the deadline twice in one week and does not write enough, the therapist is docked the week's pay. If a client requires therapist to respond 3xs/day, five days per week, the therapist is earning around $12.50/hour. This company is making a lot of money and keeps growing. It prides itself on making therapy more accessible to potential clients. But at what cost to the health and well-being of their therapists? It's incredibly disrespectful to pay so little to professionals who often owe around $200K in student loans and are required to purchase their own professional liability insurance and pay to renew their license yearly or every 2 years, and pay to take numerous trainings per year to keep their license. Therapist are also required to purchase ipads or iphones, use all of their own resources. We don't get paid for sick days or holidays. We're required to take notes and do treatments plans in our own time, unpaid. It's like a therapist sweat shop! Clients are able to demand same-day video sessions without much notice. I'm usually booked out for a week--so when a client does this to me, I have to stay up late or skip a meal or skip my daily shower/bathing. Talkspace has also implemented a new rating system. Clients can anonymously rate their therapists at any time and numerous times without being required to explain their rating so the therapist can make adjustments to ensure the client is happy and receiving the support they need. Many clients see us as bots or avatars. They don't know how hard we are working, how much we care, how much time we're spending, how little we're paid, and how high the burnout. We don't come to this work for the money. The money is terrible. They see us the way drivers often view other drivers--not as humans but as cars they can flip off when they're unhappy with how slow we're driving or any little thing. It tends to become abusive. Therapists aren't permitted to tell clients if we are not trained or skilled to help them with a particular issue. We cannot screen clients. This is unethical. I've had to treat people with eating disorders, something I have zero experience with or know-how. If a client is matched with me on my day off and they're unhappy that I haven't written or messaged them, they often leave me one star. When that happens, the complaint goes to a coach who contacts the therapist to find out the therapist's side of the story about the complaint. The coaches seem to care and are patient and nice. But why do I get called out and have to explain myself for something that isn't my fault? I've also been accused of not introducing myself to a client and only writing scripts. I told the coach who contacted me that I ALWAYS introduce myself in a video. The coach apologized and said the video cannot be seen by them. But it's on my record now anyway. If a client schedules a live video session but does not show up (which happens frequently), Talkspace does not reimburse the therapist. They call this a "therapeutic issue" that must be addressed between therapist and client. They do not get involved. So my clients can schedule live video sessions whenever they please and show up only if they feel like it. They're permitted to waste my time and interfere with my self-care routine with no repercussions. I feel like I'm walking on egg shells all the time as a Talkspace therapist. I feel like someone is always looking over my shoulder waiting for me to mess up. I do not feel comfortable with the fact that every time a client complains, someone is permitted to look into the therapist-client "room" and investigate. There have been times I've reached out to the therapist feedback email to let them know how I feel and to advocate for myself. I've been told more than once that if I'm not happy, I can leave. The therapists are the reason Talkspace exists and how the founders and administrative staff have an income! How can they go to sleep at night knowing they treat us the way they do? I now wake up every day exhausted, burned out, and sick in my stomach at the thought of working on Talkspace. I've stayed for as long as I have because therapists make so little money on one FT job. I need the extra income to pay for health insurance and health care. But that's all that it covers. I have so much anxiety all of the time that I have to get a therapist too! I hope some day I can leave. I know that I'm a good therapist. The people I work with face to face tell me that often. I've always received awards and positive feedback from supervisors. I've always given my work my all. We therapists deserve so much more than this.

Advice to Management

Morale has been declining. Negativity and burnout is on the rise among the colleagues I keep in contact with. We feel unheard. When we try to advocate for ourselves and make strong clinical recommendations, you do not even acknowledge us. You tell us instead that "change can be difficult." Yeah, we know that. We're therapists and we have the tools to navigate change in a healthy way. But this is not about change. You treat us like robots and keep increasing demands without fair compensation commensurate with the time and quality we invest in the work. You ignore us, gaslight us. In online forums online, your reputation is declining. LISTEN TO US. ACKNOWLEDGE what we're saying. Don't keep shutting us down and telling us we can leave if we aren't happy. It's not fair. You built this company on our backs, on our hard work! Creating self-care memes and groups to share inspiring stories of other therapist successes is a lame way to try to quiet our discontent.

I need the extra income to pay for health insurance and health care.

October 25, 2019

See 2 more answers

April 10, 2021

Does Talkspace offer tuition reimbursement?

Pros

It is an easy to use app with great accessibility and affordability for those in need of mental health care that would otherwise not be able to get that. It has great flexibility for the providers. They recently have started some bonus programs that have been nice-ish.

Cons

The pay that they give to therapists is an insult to the years of training and education and required continued upkeep of education and licensing. If the client is self-pay you are paid per word and the formula seems to not be clearly explained. For those that bill their insurance Talkspace receives $180.00 per session billed to insurance, but then only pay the therapist IF the client approves the session and then only give them 12.46% which equates to $22.43. There is a bit of an increase if the session was not text based and was done via video in which case it goes to $44.00. Even in a shared private practice system a therapist could get 40-60% of each session. Here in Alaska working for a non-profit you can earn $40-$45 an hour and you get medical benefits, paid time off, sick leave, ceu money, and licensing fees covered. If you aren't willing to carry a crazy caseload and do live video sessions and discharge people as soon as they don't approve the session it is really not worth it. You would do better buying HIPPA compliant software and seeing people on your own. I will say, as someone who has been with the company for years, the way they paid therapists in the beginning was fantastic. Therapists got 50% of whatever each client paid, no matter if that client was engaging in therapy or not since they were still being billed (only self-pay at this time) and the idea was that you as the therapist was available should they utilize the service, and that you were trying to engage with them and encourage use of the system. They also use to show therapists more appreciation through acknowledgement of caseload level or amount of time spent responding through gifts and accolades in a newsletter. They became more business oriented as they gained investors, and went it seems that the owners, who were tech people prior to getting counseling degrees, fell back to their business roots and forgot the amount of effort and depth of energy it takes to do this work. It is no wonder there is high turnover with places like Talkspace (and BetterHelp). On top of this there are some intense expectations in that there is a timer that the client can set in order to get a response by a certain time of day. When not in covid times there was a penalty if you missed more than 2 response request times, which to be real is highly likely if you have a full time job, or do anything other than sit on your computer or app and have a higher caseload. The idea is to have the equivalent of an hour of therapy throughout the week, but you are spending way more time especially when they set these timers and you end up having to respond 3 times a day 5 days a week. Not to mention those clients that use the audio feature and leave you 45 minutes of audio daily and expect you to respond in full every day and you are making a fraction of what you could if this was your own practice or if Talkspace valued their clinicians and paid them as if they did. They don't. It is just a mill. You will burn out they will hire someone else, rinse, repeat. It can be great to help build clientele while you set up a face to face practice which many people use it for or if the flexibility is one that you really need and you don't care about how you are compensated and just want to be a bit of a philanthropist in some way (me). Definitely not a thing for everyone, and while tele-health is the wave of the future, therapists are going to discover that this is not the way to helping sustain livelihood and more and more will just open their own practices. They have started to offer fulltime positions that have a salary and a handful of benefits like medical, but even that salary is insulting, at least for my area, especially if you have more than freshly licensed experience.

Advice to Management

Compensate Therapists as if you actually appreciate the years of training, education, and continued education required to practice. The 12.46% you give therapists per insurance billing, and only IF the client approves the session (which there is zero control over) is so insulting and explains the massive turnover and shortage that is constantly at hand. This is such a needed service for so many and when it started therapists were valued. I get the company needs to make money, but come on moving from 50% no matter what to 12.46% IF someone accepts the billing, or to a word count only compensation is so punitive and insulting and turns into significantly less than minimum wage.

The pay that they give to therapists is an insult to the years of training and education and required continued upkeep of education and licensing.

April 10, 2021

See 1 more answer

November 23, 2020

Does Talkspace offer unlimited time off?

Pros

Flexible, user friendly, video sessions are often clear and without tech issues, easy to take time off or request a hold on referrals

Cons

Punitive measures for missing response times, no live support, some clients are far too ill for online therapy, clients have very high expectations for quick/immediate results with minimal time for rapport building I overall appreciate the opportunity I’ve found with Talkspace and the extra income it provides. I certainly make more in private practice but this has been a great way to supplement that and broaden my client base. That said, I do find it concerning that client’s can remain all but anonymous if they never book a video session. I’ve had clients barely fill out demographics and never schedule a video session, despite my encouragement to do so. Ironically, those same clients tend to be the first ones to demand quick results or write a lukewarm review regarding your clinical skills. I recently had a young client with severe mental illness, active eating disorder behavior and suicidal ideation doing text only therapy and expecting intensive outpatient level results. There are significant ethical issues that arise in certain cases and I felt very uncomfortable in this situation. I’m the type of therapist that believes trust and rapport are the foundation of a good therapeutic relationship; I imagine most of us feel this way. I’ve developed this with many clients on this platform but I’ve found it difficult to achieve with others in this format.

Advice to Management

Improved screening for suicidal ideation, severe mental illness and clients requiring acute care or higher levels of care. Implement best practices in getting clients the treatment they need, even if it’s not on this platform. Allow more therapist discretion in which cases they accept. I do not do couples therapy and was given a client requesting that, which caused them to feel “bounced around”.

Flexible, user friendly, video sessions are often clear and without tech issues, easy to take time off or request a hold on referrals

November 23, 2020

See 7 more answers

November 23, 2020

What is paid time off like at Talkspace?

Pros

Flexible, user friendly, video sessions are often clear and without tech issues, easy to take time off or request a hold on referrals

Cons

Punitive measures for missing response times, no live support, some clients are far too ill for online therapy, clients have very high expectations for quick/immediate results with minimal time for rapport building I overall appreciate the opportunity I’ve found with Talkspace and the extra income it provides. I certainly make more in private practice but this has been a great way to supplement that and broaden my client base. That said, I do find it concerning that client’s can remain all but anonymous if they never book a video session. I’ve had clients barely fill out demographics and never schedule a video session, despite my encouragement to do so. Ironically, those same clients tend to be the first ones to demand quick results or write a lukewarm review regarding your clinical skills. I recently had a young client with severe mental illness, active eating disorder behavior and suicidal ideation doing text only therapy and expecting intensive outpatient level results. There are significant ethical issues that arise in certain cases and I felt very uncomfortable in this situation. I’m the type of therapist that believes trust and rapport are the foundation of a good therapeutic relationship; I imagine most of us feel this way. I’ve developed this with many clients on this platform but I’ve found it difficult to achieve with others in this format.

Advice to Management

Improved screening for suicidal ideation, severe mental illness and clients requiring acute care or higher levels of care. Implement best practices in getting clients the treatment they need, even if it’s not on this platform. Allow more therapist discretion in which cases they accept. I do not do couples therapy and was given a client requesting that, which caused them to feel “bounced around”.

Flexible, user friendly, video sessions are often clear and without tech issues, easy to take time off or request a hold on referrals

November 23, 2020

See 4 more answers
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

34 English questions out of 34

Popular Careers with Talkspace Job Seekers

JobsSalariesInterviews