XANT FAQ

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24 English questions out of 24

August 16, 2018

What are perks and other benefits like at XANT?

Pros

I've been with InsideSales.com as an intern for 3 months now and it's been great! Lots of perks to working here. - Awesome product - Great pay for an internship - Great mentors who know what they're doing - Opportunity to push features that will be used by customers - Flexible working environment

Cons

I'm sure there are cons. But my experience has been totally positive so far.

Lots of perks to working here.

August 16, 2018

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April 29, 2018

What is health insurance like at XANT?

Pros

committed employees that work really hard. select plus health plan

Cons

senior management starting with the CEO. dishonest about role.

Advice to Management

sell the company and let a professional firm do a good job.

select plus health plan

April 29, 2018

See answer

October 8, 2019

Does XANT offer health savings accounts?

Pros

Benefits: - Unlimited PTO - Generous HSA match - 401k match seems standard for area/industry - Unlimited/free diabetes/soda machine Experience: I started in tier 1 support taking phone calls and by the time I left InsideSales.com I was traveling around the country to implement the product in large enterprise companies. Along the way I learned a lot about the SaaS industry, obtained some technical skills, learned about business in general, and was able to beef up my resume. Culture: - I really, genuinely liked everybody I worked with at InsideSales.com. There are tons of smart and dedicated people there. - For being in the heart of white-bread-skim-milk Mormonland I felt like the organization I was in was somewhat diverse. It probably wouldn't be considered diverse anywhere else but for Utah County I think it was. - On my team I felt like I was able to work from home pretty much any time that I wanted to when not traveling. You tend to want to take advantage of that after flying around so much. Product: Around the time that I left, the company seemed to finally be surfacing its differentiator (massive data lake) into the product in a way that was meaningful for the end-user. Finally. New CEO: I liked Chris Harrington. I mean I didn’t know him personally or anything. I can’t stress the word “some” enough here, but I think SOME of the things that I’m going to outline in the “Cons” section will change with him at the helm. He seemed very matter-of-fact and direct. I think he inherited a situation that was much worse than he (and everyone else) was led to believe when he joined the company. I think he will turn that situation around, but it will be painful for almost everyone.

Cons

Compensation: - While some of the benefits eased the pain of this a little, at the end of the day what was left of my take-home compensation after paying my mortgage/bills was so little I couldn't meaningfully save nor improve my family's quality of life. I researched salaries for my position and found out I was making quite a bit less than the average I was finding for the area. - The company does a good job of discouraging you from even asking for a raise. I lived through three rounds of layoffs in my time at the company. Hard to ask for a raise when they're letting go of people. - But I tried anyways. After two years at the company and being moved to a position with quite a bit more responsibility, I spent nine months asking three different managers (org restructures) for a raise to be given a small bump that didn’t affect my monthly budgeting. After putting so much effort into getting a tiny bump I didn’t really feel it was worth it to ask again in the proceeding years. - Several skills were required in my position. I was able to take just one (ONE!) of those skills somewhere else for a significant pay increase. So like... thanks for giving me an environment where I had to learn and use that skill. But also... what the hell? Come on. - The bonus structure is reworked every fiscal year. While this is done to align with the current company vision it, made it difficult to focus on one strategy OR pivot. The organization or company's vision would pivot again mid fiscal year but your bonus structure is locked in for the year. If you want to pivot you can't. If you want to focus you can't. And while it did seem to all average out, some items in the bonus structure felt like they were beyond my control and I was either significantly rewarded or penalized based on those. Company vision: - Constantly in flux. Do we kill the legacy product or keep supporting it? Should we not only support it but also add new features to it? Do we focus on Enterprise customers or dedicate some resources to mid-market too? Do we make our clients honor their contracts with us and contribute to the data lake or do we try to preserve a one-sided relationship? It happens so much that you just become apathetic to change. Then you get a survey: “Do you believe in the new direction the company is taking?” Yeah sure. - Even though it's been around for 15+ years the company still feels like it's in start-up mode in a lot of ways. - InsideSales.com seemed very top-heavy for the longest time. Though I’m not sure if that’s still the case. Work/life balance: I quickly tired of the travel required of my position. When you're traveling, you're away from your family, the comfort of your home, your hobbies, etc. The workload when you are traveling can be tremendous. And you end up traveling at least half the month on average--sometimes you can be traveling every week of a month, then the next month not at all, then two weeks out of the month the next, etc. The travel schedule sporadic-ness and workload combination make it difficult or impossible to develop professional skills (that don't relate directly to your function) outside of working hours. I was going to school part time but had to drop classes after I took this position. Work travel is great for some people. Some of my coworkers who were single loved it. Even some with families loved it. But I couldn’t seem to strike a balance that let me have quality family and development time while traveling for work. Product: - InsideSales.com claims to have the largest sales data lake in the industry. I believe that. I’m also afraid that much of that data is stagnant and old. Most of the benefit of that data lake is really stressed and talked about in the sales process but not delivered in the product. It is stressed that InsideSales.com can help you know who to sell to and when. But everyone at the company seemed to constantly be asking “okay… how?” The employees themselves didn’t even seem to understand how because it’s not actually in the end product. This is another aspect I feel is turning around or changing for the better, but I cannot be sure as of the time I left the company. - Sales teams promise things that aren’t in the product. Engineering then has to scramble to make it by a certain deadline. QA then feels rushed. And then everyone is affected by bugs. I know that’s pretty normal in the software industry, but it seemed especially egregious at InsideSales.com. - This is likely a matter of perception, but I felt like some (certainly not all) of the features that were released weren’t being asked for by anybody. While things that were popular and requested with some frequency were either killed off completely or kept getting delayed. - The product never felt enterprise-ready. Lots of good features and cool bells and whistles, yes. But some items that are essential within large organizations—like automation and user/content management—had limitations that made administrative work with the product a headache. If managers won’t buy in then they won’t get their end users to either. - Competition has caught up. If customers can’t take advantage of the data lake then the product is just a more expensive version of things that are already on the market. Leadership seems to know and acknowledge this, but again back to the first point… until two months ago nothing ever seemed to surface in the product to help customers take advantage of the data lake. And there is still much to do in that regard. Job security: - As I mentioned previously, I survived three rounds of layoffs in my time at the company. Those are just absolute morale killers (as they would be anywhere). I guess InsideSales.com had another round of layoffs a week or so ago. Maybe that would have been the one where I was let go. But there was always some air of inevitability that it will be your turn next round. - And there always seemed to be a next round. After each round the company would always say they’re positioning themselves to be more profitable and avoid layoffs in the future. I heard that speech several times. For everyone left I hope it's true this time. - Due to the company’s constantly shifting focus you might be working in Enterprise world one day, but then the company decides it wants to go after mid-market or SMB again and you’re moved to one of those segments. Later, the company decides to abandon mid-market and SMB or changes the definition of what qualifies as “enterprise” and guess what? You’re gone. Why did I seek a new opportunity? Honestly, I’m not too picky. I could live with most of those cons I outlined above for the right compensation or internal career path. But neither was there for me, unfortunately. My pay felt stagnant.* I wanted a different career within the company but there was no internal way to get there from my current position without improving my skills outside of working hours. The travel/workload did not allow me the time to seek those skills outside of work. And that kept me stuck in my current position. It was just a circle I couldn’t get out of while I was working there. *To be 100% fair and transparent, I was given a decent-sized raise right before I left. But this was after I had already sought and accepted new opportunities outside the company but had not yet informed my superiors. The amount I was brought up to brought me to a level that I felt was fair, but it is what I should have been earning for at least two years before finally being given that amount. And still, I had a handful of offers that were all higher than the new amount I was given at InsideSales.com.

Advice to Management

My immediate managers were good at managing. I don't really have advice for them. Also, the managers immediately above my managers were great and seemed to stick up for and help out all of us under them. The stuff I would like to see changed mostly seems like it has to come from the top down. Compensation for the CX org and product management/bug fixes/prioritization need to be re-worked. Company vision and direction under Chris needs to stay on focus (and I believe it will).

- Generous HSA match

October 8, 2019

See answer

October 8, 2019

What is the retirement plan like at XANT?

Pros

Benefits: - Unlimited PTO - Generous HSA match - 401k match seems standard for area/industry - Unlimited/free diabetes/soda machine Experience: I started in tier 1 support taking phone calls and by the time I left InsideSales.com I was traveling around the country to implement the product in large enterprise companies. Along the way I learned a lot about the SaaS industry, obtained some technical skills, learned about business in general, and was able to beef up my resume. Culture: - I really, genuinely liked everybody I worked with at InsideSales.com. There are tons of smart and dedicated people there. - For being in the heart of white-bread-skim-milk Mormonland I felt like the organization I was in was somewhat diverse. It probably wouldn't be considered diverse anywhere else but for Utah County I think it was. - On my team I felt like I was able to work from home pretty much any time that I wanted to when not traveling. You tend to want to take advantage of that after flying around so much. Product: Around the time that I left, the company seemed to finally be surfacing its differentiator (massive data lake) into the product in a way that was meaningful for the end-user. Finally. New CEO: I liked Chris Harrington. I mean I didn’t know him personally or anything. I can’t stress the word “some” enough here, but I think SOME of the things that I’m going to outline in the “Cons” section will change with him at the helm. He seemed very matter-of-fact and direct. I think he inherited a situation that was much worse than he (and everyone else) was led to believe when he joined the company. I think he will turn that situation around, but it will be painful for almost everyone.

Cons

Compensation: - While some of the benefits eased the pain of this a little, at the end of the day what was left of my take-home compensation after paying my mortgage/bills was so little I couldn't meaningfully save nor improve my family's quality of life. I researched salaries for my position and found out I was making quite a bit less than the average I was finding for the area. - The company does a good job of discouraging you from even asking for a raise. I lived through three rounds of layoffs in my time at the company. Hard to ask for a raise when they're letting go of people. - But I tried anyways. After two years at the company and being moved to a position with quite a bit more responsibility, I spent nine months asking three different managers (org restructures) for a raise to be given a small bump that didn’t affect my monthly budgeting. After putting so much effort into getting a tiny bump I didn’t really feel it was worth it to ask again in the proceeding years. - Several skills were required in my position. I was able to take just one (ONE!) of those skills somewhere else for a significant pay increase. So like... thanks for giving me an environment where I had to learn and use that skill. But also... what the hell? Come on. - The bonus structure is reworked every fiscal year. While this is done to align with the current company vision it, made it difficult to focus on one strategy OR pivot. The organization or company's vision would pivot again mid fiscal year but your bonus structure is locked in for the year. If you want to pivot you can't. If you want to focus you can't. And while it did seem to all average out, some items in the bonus structure felt like they were beyond my control and I was either significantly rewarded or penalized based on those. Company vision: - Constantly in flux. Do we kill the legacy product or keep supporting it? Should we not only support it but also add new features to it? Do we focus on Enterprise customers or dedicate some resources to mid-market too? Do we make our clients honor their contracts with us and contribute to the data lake or do we try to preserve a one-sided relationship? It happens so much that you just become apathetic to change. Then you get a survey: “Do you believe in the new direction the company is taking?” Yeah sure. - Even though it's been around for 15+ years the company still feels like it's in start-up mode in a lot of ways. - InsideSales.com seemed very top-heavy for the longest time. Though I’m not sure if that’s still the case. Work/life balance: I quickly tired of the travel required of my position. When you're traveling, you're away from your family, the comfort of your home, your hobbies, etc. The workload when you are traveling can be tremendous. And you end up traveling at least half the month on average--sometimes you can be traveling every week of a month, then the next month not at all, then two weeks out of the month the next, etc. The travel schedule sporadic-ness and workload combination make it difficult or impossible to develop professional skills (that don't relate directly to your function) outside of working hours. I was going to school part time but had to drop classes after I took this position. Work travel is great for some people. Some of my coworkers who were single loved it. Even some with families loved it. But I couldn’t seem to strike a balance that let me have quality family and development time while traveling for work. Product: - InsideSales.com claims to have the largest sales data lake in the industry. I believe that. I’m also afraid that much of that data is stagnant and old. Most of the benefit of that data lake is really stressed and talked about in the sales process but not delivered in the product. It is stressed that InsideSales.com can help you know who to sell to and when. But everyone at the company seemed to constantly be asking “okay… how?” The employees themselves didn’t even seem to understand how because it’s not actually in the end product. This is another aspect I feel is turning around or changing for the better, but I cannot be sure as of the time I left the company. - Sales teams promise things that aren’t in the product. Engineering then has to scramble to make it by a certain deadline. QA then feels rushed. And then everyone is affected by bugs. I know that’s pretty normal in the software industry, but it seemed especially egregious at InsideSales.com. - This is likely a matter of perception, but I felt like some (certainly not all) of the features that were released weren’t being asked for by anybody. While things that were popular and requested with some frequency were either killed off completely or kept getting delayed. - The product never felt enterprise-ready. Lots of good features and cool bells and whistles, yes. But some items that are essential within large organizations—like automation and user/content management—had limitations that made administrative work with the product a headache. If managers won’t buy in then they won’t get their end users to either. - Competition has caught up. If customers can’t take advantage of the data lake then the product is just a more expensive version of things that are already on the market. Leadership seems to know and acknowledge this, but again back to the first point… until two months ago nothing ever seemed to surface in the product to help customers take advantage of the data lake. And there is still much to do in that regard. Job security: - As I mentioned previously, I survived three rounds of layoffs in my time at the company. Those are just absolute morale killers (as they would be anywhere). I guess InsideSales.com had another round of layoffs a week or so ago. Maybe that would have been the one where I was let go. But there was always some air of inevitability that it will be your turn next round. - And there always seemed to be a next round. After each round the company would always say they’re positioning themselves to be more profitable and avoid layoffs in the future. I heard that speech several times. For everyone left I hope it's true this time. - Due to the company’s constantly shifting focus you might be working in Enterprise world one day, but then the company decides it wants to go after mid-market or SMB again and you’re moved to one of those segments. Later, the company decides to abandon mid-market and SMB or changes the definition of what qualifies as “enterprise” and guess what? You’re gone. Why did I seek a new opportunity? Honestly, I’m not too picky. I could live with most of those cons I outlined above for the right compensation or internal career path. But neither was there for me, unfortunately. My pay felt stagnant.* I wanted a different career within the company but there was no internal way to get there from my current position without improving my skills outside of working hours. The travel/workload did not allow me the time to seek those skills outside of work. And that kept me stuck in my current position. It was just a circle I couldn’t get out of while I was working there. *To be 100% fair and transparent, I was given a decent-sized raise right before I left. But this was after I had already sought and accepted new opportunities outside the company but had not yet informed my superiors. The amount I was brought up to brought me to a level that I felt was fair, but it is what I should have been earning for at least two years before finally being given that amount. And still, I had a handful of offers that were all higher than the new amount I was given at InsideSales.com.

Advice to Management

My immediate managers were good at managing. I don't really have advice for them. Also, the managers immediately above my managers were great and seemed to stick up for and help out all of us under them. The stuff I would like to see changed mostly seems like it has to come from the top down. Compensation for the CX org and product management/bug fixes/prioritization need to be re-worked. Company vision and direction under Chris needs to stay on focus (and I believe it will).

- 401k match seems standard for area/industry

October 8, 2019

See answer

August 22, 2018

What is paid time off like at XANT?

Pros

- Unlimited PTO - Flexible and caring management who accept suggestions and support and reward those who go the extra mile and take initiative to be the change they want to see. - Great benefits - Quickly move up the pay-scale and career ladder with positive performance - Never get bored, never a lack of new opportunities and challenges, every day is interesting and full of new things to learn. - High energy, passionate upper management who are eager to see success and enable mid-level management to make the changes needed to get there. - Increased transparency into company success and performance - Monthly team rewards and spiffs

Cons

- Sometimes lack of communication and willingness for coordination between departments - Difficulty and hesitancy to act on non-performing employees - Customer retention and satisfaction sometimes too often made more important than overall organization and employee success and satisfaction. - Extremely stingy with, and very little access to, quality company swag beyond the occasional cheap green t-shirt.

Advice to Management

- Listen to the little guy, get on the ground level, don't rely on low-level managers to relay employee concerns and difficulties. Stay connected with the day-to-day operations and performance. - Help facilitate inter-departmental collaboration and synchronization. Make it easier to report problems and to make needed changes, even to long standing protocols or traditions. Stay alert to signs of and be willing to act quickly on difficult or non-performing employees. - For the love of your employees, why can't we have more swag?! We want to represent and be proud of the company around our friends and family and internally as well, allow us to! Also it is freezing inside the building, help us stay warm.

- Unlimited PTO

August 22, 2018

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24 English questions out of 24