Amazon User Experience Designer Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Amazon User Experience Designer Interview Questions

Updated Aug 30, 2017
58 Interview Reviews

Experience

Experience
52%
13%
33%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview
32%
26%
22%
12
4
2
2

Difficulty

3.5
Average

Difficulty

Hard
Average
Easy

58 Candidate Interview ReviewsBack to all Interviews

Filter

Sort: PopularDateDifficulty

Filter

Sort: PopularDateDifficulty
  1. Helpful (1)  

    User Experience Designer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    Declined Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. I interviewed at Amazon (Seattle, WA) in August 2017.

    Interview

    Amazon is hiring at breakneck pace, without a lot of care or consideration of how they are going about the process. I interviewed at Amazon a few times, and the process was chaotic (to say the least). I don't think that any of the jobs I interviewed for were ones I actually applied for on their jobs site (black hole), but rather I have been contacted by random recruiters and often handed over to the hiring manager without any information about the teams or the positions I was interviewing.

    5 out of 6 times the hiring managers were late (like 15 minutes) to the one hour interview because they had interviews right before mine, and rushed through questions so they could hurry on to the next one. And, as other reviewers have mentioned, there is the typical awkwardness of phone interviews, where you end up talking over each other.

    There's just not a lot of time to get a sense of the hiring manager, team, culture or position. VERY production line. It was an extremely impersonal process, and this in itself gave a very distinct impression of how their teams operate. Skype or Hangouts interviews would at least provide a measure of visual feedback and personalization that phone interviews do not.

    Interview Questions

    • Amazon will ask you about questions relating to their internal values.   1 Answer

    Reasons for Declining

    I literally had no feedback or response from the hiring manager during one call: he would ask me questions, I would respond, and then nothing...sometimes I wondered if he was still even on the call. It was awkward. When the recruiter later told me they wanted to move forward, I declined. Imagine how hard it would be to be successful working for someone who doesn't communicate at all.


  2. Helpful (3)  

    User Experience Design Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 3 weeks. I interviewed at Amazon (Seattle, WA) in March 2017.

    Interview

    Interview was conducted via phone (on their conference call platform). I was asked to walk through the projects in my portfolio and the interviewer asked questions along the way. I then answered a few behavioral questions about how I would handle certain scenarios on the job.

    The interviewer was polite and the tone conversational. It was a little awkward being over the phone as there were some times where we were talking over each other unintentionally, but that is the nature of phone interviews. Overall my experience with the interviewer was positive.

    However, the scheduling of the interview was more stressful than it needed to be. Recruiter was not very responsive and left me hanging on a number of occasions. Prepare yourself for last minute notification on interview times and/or no notification of cancellations.

    Interview Questions

    • How would you handle a situation where you would not be able to meet a deadline?   1 Answer
  3. Helpful (1)  

    Senior User Experience Designer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 2+ months. I interviewed at Amazon (Seattle, WA) in January 2017.

    Interview

    Was contacted by an Amazon recruiter about an opportunity. Granted, the whole process was started during December and then the holidays came the whole thing took way too long and ate up a lot of my time. I lost workdays and hence money in the process. The design role + comp was kept very vague. This was very unsettling to say the least. After a few phone screens they flew me to Seattle for the in-person on-site interview. I felt that the whole on-site screening process was not done very well at all. The portfolio presentation—which is the meat of our design work—was given 1 hour in a group setting and then the 1:1 sessions which were basically loaded with questions and not looking at work took 5 hours. Bad ratio. The on-site interview day needs to be changed IMHO because it's a broken evaluation process.

    Interview Questions

    • Tell me about a time when you took a big risk and you failed.   Answer Question
    • Tell me about a time when you went against the whole team because you believed your solution was correct.   Answer Question

  4. Helpful (3)  

    Senior User Experience Designer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took a week. I interviewed at Amazon.

    Interview

    Quick response from HR, who scheduled a phone screen with a UX team member. Very heavy on STAR questions. They have a script to follow, and type their assessments of your STAR answers into a database system. UX interviewer was very knowledgeable and down to earth. Only complaint is that their way of telling me I wasn't going further was by ignoring my follow-up emails. Would have been nice to get a simple "No thanks" reply.

    Interview Questions

    • Tell me a time when you disagreed with a design requirement.   2 Answers

  5. Helpful (17)  

    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 6 weeks. I interviewed at Amazon.

    Interview

    Amazon is growing so quickly that many managers and even practitioners have started announcing on LinkedIn that they're looking for people, and some of them will reach out to you if you simply view their profile. That's how my conversation started. The initial call was awesome and professionally done, and thereafter I was handed off to a recruiter for the more formal/HR aspect of things. Also incredibly professional. Email communication was clear and concise, responses were quick and accurate, and every scheduled phone call happened on-time.

    The onsite interview was setup painlessly, and that consists of the storied "loop" where the day begins with a 60-minute portfolio presentation. Your recruiter will give you a thorough run-down of how to handle this and what to show, but expect to get into your thought process and demonstrate customer obsession. Hopefully you've saved your sketches! That's going to be much more interesting to the panel than your finished products. You'll be peppered with some tough questions, just answer candidly and acknowledge when you don't know. You will be speaking to people tapping away at laptops, which can be disconcerting, but I appreciated the rigor and challenge. Afterward, you'll talk to 5-7 people in various roles 1:1. Each person will ask open-ended behavioral questions based on the leadership principles, and will usually probe further with follow-up questions. Know the leadership principles and directly link your responses to actual experiences YOU have had. Avoid "we" and "us" responses unless absolutely necessary. Again, you'll be speaking to people behind laptops, and yes, they are documenting everything you say--which is a good thing, because it ensures that everyone involved in the loop gets a big-picture view of who you are and how you think. Some will be more conversational, others just want a detailed response, but either way, be open and detailed.

    There's most likely a whiteboarding exercise, too. React to it with a lot of ideas, and be more innovative than purely functional. Again, they're looking to see how expansive your thinking is.

    In my experience, the level of confidence, security, and professionalism of everyone I interacted with was unparalleled. They take a genuine interest in you and most of the conversations are enjoyable despite the level of challenge involved. Most of the bigger tech companies follow an interview process similar to Amazon's (and if they were influenced by it, that wouldn't be surprising), and while it's difficult--I walked out almost in a daze--the discipline and rigorous nature is worth it. I talked to a couple of smaller companies afterward and almost laughed at how poorly prepared and sloppy they were compared to Amazon.

    Interview Questions

    • Talk about an instance where you received negative feedback and how you reacted.   Answer Question

  6.  

    User Experience Designer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in New York, NY
    Declined Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 4 weeks. I interviewed at Amazon (New York, NY) in September 2016.

    Interview

    Referred for a specific position. Phone screener. Initial interview with UX Manager (1hour phone). Then two rounds with senior UX Designers (1 hour each over the phone). Overall experience was positive. Make sure to relate your experience and why you want to work for Amazon to their leadership principles.

    Interview Questions


  7. Helpful (11)  

    Senior User Experience Designer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 3+ months. I interviewed at Amazon (Seattle, WA) in July 2016.

    Interview

    I had a employee referral and recruiters that contacted me from LinkedIn.

    1. Recruiter Call - asked about my background and design process and job ID they think that will fit me. They are looking to see if there is a fit for the role and is mostly taking notes.

    2. Two phone screenings with UX Designers from the respective teams asking about my design process mainly. Make sure you can answer how you can validate your design, your process and your work examples.

    ON-SITE INTERVIEWS

    3. Presentation (60mins) - the recruiter will give you a Portfolio Presentation Guideline. It will tell you to go into more breadth but I went with into depth of 3 of my most recent work. Make sure you explain clearly the problems you are solving, how you did it and what was the outcome. It was fairly easy mind you I did a lot of preparations in making sure it was clear, concise and presentable. Amazon is a very narrative and data driven company so if you could add a good story and have data, that's always a plus. The questions they asked at the end was more clarifications and why did you do this and that.

    4. Lunch (60mins) - very casual and can talk about anything. I had lunch with a hiring manager and can ask him anything. Not sure if it goes on record (doesn't seem like it because he didn't take notes) but have fun, ask lots of questions and remain professional.

    5. 1:1 (45 - 60 min each) - this is the most formal process. They all had some kind of work sheets and took lots of notes. They asked all behavioral questions and are looking for Amazon Leadership Principles examples from you.

    6. Design Challenge (part of the 1:1) - I had a Senior UX Designer give me a real problem to solve. This was one of the easiest interview for me and can be for you too if you have a process. I started off by asking a lot of questions and trying to find out what the problem is, business goals, users and technical limitations. Once I have those information, I also have a list of assumptions if any and user stories. I didn't get time to draw but I wrote them down and thought out aloud and tried to work with the interviewer as if we were working together. Towards the end I was asked to explain how I know my design is done.

    I didn't know how I went as most don't show expression but I could tell my presentation gave them a very good first impression.

    I was given offers 2 days after my interview and accepted.

    Interview Questions

  8.  

    Senior User Experience Designer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied in-person. The process took 3+ months. I interviewed at Amazon (Seattle, WA) in July 2016.

    Interview

    Interviews all took place on 1 day, starting at 9 with Portfolio Review/ presentation with all interviewers (1 was brought in via teleconference from a different building). Then, it was 1 on 1 with each interviewer. Interviews were Q&A format and 2 were wireframing sessions. One interviewer took me out to lunch. The questions that interviewers asked were from a standard set; looking for certain behaviours that a candidate previously exhibited. Other's have probably noted that it's like the Blade Runner 'Voight-Kampff' test to see if you are a human or a replicant (without the machine to see if you are lying or trying to fake human responses). If you are smart enough, you can outsmart the questions and give answers the interviewers want, but it really ends up just being a game.

    Interview Questions

    • Tell me about one time when.... was the standard format. For example, 'Tell me about one time when you saw a problem and fixed it, even though the problem wasn't within your area or jurisdiction'   1 Answer

  9. Helpful (2)  

    Senior User Experience Designer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    The process took 2+ months. I interviewed at Amazon (Seattle, WA).

    Interview

    A recruiter reached out on LinkedIn. After I showed interest, then the case was pass to another recruiter and an phone interview was set up with a designer in the team. I was asked to talk through my portfolio. After that, I got an onsite interview. The over experience was good. Very effective. Everybody was nice during the process. A few highlights:
    1. To me, the recruiters were always carefully following scripts, so effective sometimes they even behave and sound robotic. (one example of a few: Before the onsite interview, there was a phone call setup to have the recruiter give me a brief. It was very nice of them but I felt like talking to an android. The recruiter was obviously reading through scripts.)
    2. Presentation of portfolio is key. I didn't do a good job on the presentation. On the other hand, the interview panel tried little to help either. My presentation skill is one thing, my portfolio is another. I was not sure which one they value more.
    3. The whiteboard practice and behavior questions were nice setup, but they were a bit lame in my practice. The behavior questions were asking for the same thing in all different way. The whiteboard practice topic I got is about elevator. The requirement was so open, no persona nor user scenario given, no design goal given, no business goal given...I asked but was told "do whatever you want", so I couldn't hold my ego to proposal a "doctor who" style solution (It is ideal to me). Again, I don't know how they value my visualization here.

    (side story to the whiteboard practice: right after that section, I was walked out of the building for lunch break. I finally noticed how the elevator operation system behave in Amazon building. If this was the inspiration of the topic, if I were the interviewer, I would ask the candidate to do a whiteboard design for an Energy-Efficient elevator operation system, which would be a much more interesting and good topic for this purpose, in my opinion.)

    Overall, I think it was a good experience. If you could fit in the culture (include design culture), it could be a good place to work at. But I guess you might have to work on a small piece assigned to you, with little influence on the whole product and the big picture. As a seasonal designer you might not have too much room to grow. To me, their senior title is for designer with 3-5 years experience. If you come with a strong portfolio and tons of experience, I would suggest you try to apply for design manager or principle level roles.

    Interview Questions


  10. Helpful (1)  

    User Experience Design Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    Declined Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 3+ months. I interviewed at Amazon (Seattle, WA) in June 2016.

    Interview

    The interview process was very smooth. I really enjoyed talking to the recruiter and the team members. I was asked to talk about my experiences, one of my project and do a design challenge over the phone using a whiteboard tool. Everybody was professional and interesting to talk to. I had a counter-offer, and that's the only reason I had to decline.

    Interview Questions

    Reasons for Declining

    Mainly because I had a counter offer.


Don't Miss Out On a Job You Love
Upload a resume to easily apply to jobs from anywhere. It's simple to set up.