Baylor Scott & White Health Project Manager Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Baylor Scott & White Health Project Manager Interview Questions

11 Interview Reviews

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Helpful (1)  

Project Manager Interview

Anonymous Employee
Accepted Offer
Positive Experience
Average Interview

Application

The process took 1 day. I interviewed at Baylor Scott & White Health.

Interview

Definitely something outside of the ordinary interview! Read some online so knew it would be unique but don't see why some took it as a negative. It is a large group setting that you interact with through some team building activities. I guess if you are not a people person and not interested in moving out of the old school methods, this may be odd but I really saw a lot of benefit in it. Only advice would be to keep an open mind and engage.

Interview Questions

Other Interview Reviews for Baylor Scott & White Health

  1. Helpful (11)  

    Project Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 1 day. I interviewed at Baylor Scott & White Health.

    Interview

    Note that Baylor Scott and White PMO does this process every month. They call in a group of people of about 15 to about 20 interviewees every month, apparently whether or not they have a business need for new project managers.

    You're told to arrive at 7:45. When you arrive, you are informed that you'll be waiting until 8:00 at which time you're shown into a conference room and given a case study. There is a brief project description with a timeline, several staff members with a brief descriptor of each staffer and a circumstance to plan. You can choose only a select few to serve on the project. On the second sheet you list who you chose and why, along with a schedule, and a simple risk identification/mitigation matrix to complete. You're given an hour to complete this case study.

    The group is then taken to another room where you do several team relations, communications and problem solving games. They are fun and interesting games, but it feels a little creepy because some of the PMO staff is standing around the room silently watching you and making notes on clipboards. These activities go on for about an hour.

    The third phase consists of the group being divided into two teams and given a situation where the group must plan an activity and then enact the plan. This is a timed activity with minimal instructions and the groups are in competition with one another to see who can get the best time.I have to admit, it was an enjoyable time if somewhat confusing.

    Once all of this is done, you 're given lunch then informed who will be moving on to the 'traditional interviews'. In my group of 20, two moved on. From what I hear in previous reviews, this 10% ratio is about average.

    So, what are they looking for? You'll never know. When the Director was asked by one of the interviewees, she was either unable or unwilling to give any direct indicator of what she was looking for. She says she developed this process and has been using it for years so that she can find the applicant who will best mesh with her organization. You will receive no feedback and, in fact, will have no clue as to what you are being evaluated upon.

    The two people who went through in my group were very different. One of them was very quiet. I'm not sure I heard him say anything during the four hours, so if this was an assessment of communication skills, I have no idea how he was evaluated. The other guy was very nice and engaging but I didn't hear him contribute anything of any greater significance than most others. This one one did have a healthcare background though, so maybe that gave him an edge.

    Maybe they were evaluating off the project management case study? Maybe, but we were told on several occasions that some of us had project management backgrounds, some didn't. It didn't really matter because the PMO had enough resources to 'train up' any of us to the level they needed. It was that 'something else' that would allow you to integrate in their team that is what mattered.

    Use your own judgment but if I were to advise a friend I would have to tell them not to waste their time. If you have to take a vacation day or travel to the site you're actually costing yourself money for a 1 in 10 chance of getting to interview. I don't even play video games but my advice would be to just spend the morning playing a video game and then take a good nap. It'll be just as enjoyable and you'll actually feel like you've accomplished more for the day.

    In most interviews the applicant is evaluating the organization as much as the organization is evaluating the applicant. You don't get to do this with BS&W PMO interviews. Additionally, with other interviews you gain experience in interviewing if nothing else. With the BS&W PMO interview, the only beneficiary is BS&W. They ask you to give up your time and energy, offering nothing in return. The biggest 'bonus' we're offered is that we 'never need to apply to any project management job at BS&W project management positions again'. The Director did offer to forward our information to any hiring manager you identify, but do you want someone who essentially told you that you're not good enough to join the team to be your internal advocate?

    Finally, we were told several times that they realized this was a strange interview process but we were assured that it had been very successful for the PMO organization. I'm sure that those who join the organization were successful - just as a mirror is successful in reflecting its current environment. The downside to this methodology is that it limits possibilities. Applicants who do not fit into the established boxes are likely to be overlooked - as they are never even interviewed - and thus cannot become the outside-the-box change advocates that propel organizations forward or prepare them for the next generation.

    Interview Questions

    • The only thing like an interview question was the case study. Don't expect any project management-specific tests outside of a case study that is fairly straight forward. Nothing is asked about waterfall or agile methodologies, the PMBOK will not help; neither will PMP (or other PMI certs), agile certs, scrum experience, or virtually anything else that you would except to be beneficial.   Answer Question

  2. Helpful (6)  

    Project Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Dallas, TX
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 1 day. I interviewed at Baylor Scott & White Health (Dallas, TX) in September 2015.

    Interview

    Received email stating to call and reserve a spot for group interview. Group interview was with 17 others and was more of a problem-solving session than a typical interview. They have you hand a ball around as fast as possible, then a swap the people (kinda like checkers (just know the pattern 1 right-2 left-3 right-4 left-3 right-2 left-1right)), then create a silhouette of a picture using shapes (a Chinese game of some sort) but you cant talk at all, and finally a race by touching papers within an area (try to avoid penalties and ask a ton of questions up front).

    Interview Questions

    • There was a 1-hour case study at the start. Then the games came.   Answer Question
  3. Helpful (18)  

    Project Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Temple, TX
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Baylor Scott & White Health (Temple, TX) in August 2015.

    Interview

    I am writing this review to help others as the other review does not provide enough information. My aim is to save people the heartache of going through the entire process.

    An internal BSW recruiter will initially contact you to let you know that their hiring manager is interested in interviewing you and will ask for your contact info. The next step is an invitation from said hiring manager for a group interview that they run once per month. They have you come in early in the morning in Temple, TX (apparently they do their interviews in Dallas as well) and tell you to expect to be there the entire day if selected.

    At this point, I was a bit apprehensive about going but had nothing better to do that day so I figured I would go for the experience.

    Approximately 15 of us showed up. Right from the beginning, everyone was trying to stand out by smiling and talking to one another. It felt artificial at first but as the morning progressed some of us became friends and exchanged contact information.

    The first exercise was a pen/paper case study. If you have poor handwriting, don't even bother going. You will not have enough time to complete this exercise and be legible.

    After the case study, we were put in a room where two teams faced each other, with a panel of 5 judges with notepads looking at us, and they had us play a game but gave us no specific rules; the point was to figure out efficiencies as a team. The second game involved a puzzle where they rushed us to read some rules and get started. My best guess is that here they were looking for collaboration, rather than competition and to pay attention to detail. The third exercise involved planning out a strategy to play a game that also required to become efficient and to communicate with the team.

    At the end of the morning, after waiting for over an hour in a conference room, the hiring manager said that their team found none of us to be of interest and told us all to go home. They said they would keep our resumes on file in case other positions opened up within BSW.

    Now. They said that we all had good qualifications but all they were looking for was a "good fit". I saw some people who were highly experienced and with low experience try to stand out, ask relevant questions, participate actively, perform well as a team, etc. So that makes me wonder what it was that they were looking for.

    What I did notice from their panel of judges was that they were very reserved and serious, almost immune to humor. I don't know if that was part of the exercise or if that was how they were on a day to day basis. My take is that they were looking for someone who is serious, solves problems quickly with very little information.

    My advice for those who are in the Austin/Round Rock region is to not waste their time and drive all the way to Temple UNLESS they are good at solving puzzles and absolutely love to play teamwork games. If you are not used to this, you will be wasting your time. You will fail at their games, and you will be told to go home.

    If you have been unemployed for a while and after several interviews with other potential employers; in other words, if you are desperate for a job and you figure you may luck out by showing your personality, you will be wasting your time.

    What bothers me the most is that they could have easily weeded many potential candidates out by having the candidates take an assessment online that shows that a candidate has low potential for solving puzzles as fast as they expect. It just doesn't make sense. Not everyone is fit for this type of work and they should be upfront about it instead of wasting people's time. Perhaps they are just trying to fill up their database with resumes - who knows. They never give you any feedback.

    I do want to note that I am not upset at BSW, I'm just trying to be as objective as I can to provide them with feedback as I know they monitor what gets posted here (they mentioned it themselves) and for others to know what they're walking into. I know they mention that everyone has potential but their screening process is too intense for it to be so vague in the invitation.

    Interview Questions

    • Not a single one. Just a case study, but no feedback was provided.   Answer Question

  4. Helpful (15)  

    Project Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Temple, TX
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 1 day. I interviewed at Baylor Scott & White Health (Temple, TX) in August 2015.

    Interview

    Group Interview, cattle herding. I kicked myself because I knew this would be a mistake but hey, I need a job. You are given a written pm scenario test. Then you play group "behavorial games". This is immediately flawed. Think about putting together a large group of people who have held jobs as a Project Manager to compete against similiarly minded people. It's like Shark Week with smiles.

    Now introduce this large group of Project Managers to your team of 6 PMO employees, and tell the group how these people will be watching you...oh..and don't talk to them. You now have created an elitist atmosphere of which the large group is driven to perform to because everyone there wants a j-o-b. I've never seen such a feeding frenzy and I am ashamed I participated. At a certain point you have to ask yourself, is this the kind of organization I want to work for? My answer was No but I stayed because I'm not rude.

    After the "games" your large group goes into a conference room while the "the team" compares notes in another room. You get to make your own sandwhich and chat amongst yourselves. After about 30 minutes the Director comes back and tells you who passed this round and would move next to traditional job interview. In this case, 16% were "selected" and 84% of people who took time to drive to Temple, TX were dismissed.

    It's a sad day that people are treated this way. The Director has supposingly devised this self described proven and foolproof way to find the people that will fit in their culture. Too bad it's in such a de-humanizing way.

    Think twice before you go on this interview. They will not tell you why you were not selected so you walk away with an impression that you are flawed. Which is not really the case most likely. It's the interview process is flawed. I would never condone treating people this way, it's so disrespectful.

    Interview Questions


  5. Helpful (15)  

    Project Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 1 day. I interviewed at Baylor Scott & White Health.

    Interview

    As with the other reviewers for the Project and Program Management positions, I also went through the group interview. As with the others, it started with a case study where we were to be given an hour, but in reality were only given about 50 minutes because the session started 10 minutes late. After the case study, there were the numerous leadership/team building exercises which I won’t go into detail about. They were nice enough to provide lunch, snacks and drinks, so I will give them that. After the exercises and the lunch, which all told took about 4 hours, 1 person out of 12 was chosen to move on to the face to face interviews. The other 11 were summarily dismissed with a thank you for coming, but no other explanation.

    So this is the bit that will come across as sour grapes on my part, because I wasn’t the one chosen. Being honest with myself, I wouldn’t have been a good fit for this organization, so I hold no grudge in that respect. Where I do have issue with the process is that in the Interviewers eyes, they deemed that only 1 person out of 12 was worthy of their additional time and effort. That only 1 person out of 12 would “fit” their special culture. To top it off, the 1 person chosen was already a Scott & White employee, looking for an internal move to the PMO. Meanwhile, 11 other people, some of whom drove from as far away as Austin on their own dime, some of whom had to take vacation time, were left wondering why they just drove 50 miles for a free lunch and to play games?

    There is no doubt that the PMO Director is very bright, and she has the resume to prove it. And it is apparent from the other reviews on this site that they have been using the same process going on 3 years now. From the 5 other reviews listed, along with my experience, over 90 people have participated in this exercise, with only 13 people moving on for actual face to face interviews, with no idea on how many offers were actually extended. And this is only taking into account those people who have taken the time to add a review. There is no telling how many times others have been subjected to this process.

    I understand the importance of finding the right people for your organization, and in doing the due diligence to determine if a candidate has the necessary skills to perform the job, however I think this “interview” approach, no matter how cutting edge they think it is, is laziness on their part. It is quite apparent that the folks conducting this “interview” value their time over that of the interviewee. There is no pre-screening interview, and they obviously have a search engine which goes through online resumes looking for key words which they target. If you are going to ask somebody to commit four hours of their day, and whatever gas money it takes to get to the interview, you owe that person an assessment of why they either didn’t fit your team dynamic, or where their competencies were lacking. That feedback would be valuable to any job seeker, give them something to build on, and make the effort a little more worthwhile.

    I have no illusions that this review will impact the way this Director conducts her interviews in the future. My only goal is to alert potential job seekers about what they are in for if they get an email inviting them to a casual group interview with the PMO Director in Temple, Texas.

    Interview Questions

    • I would post a question if they actually asked an interview question.   Answer Question

  6. Helpful (4)  

    Project Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Temple, TX
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 1 day. I interviewed at Baylor Scott & White Health (Temple, TX) in June 2015.

    Interview

    Non-standard: ~20-25 candidates participate together. Activities are designed to promote and evaluate critical thinking and performance in situation. Dress was casual (nice jeans and polo or collared shirt for men) and nice jeans or khaki pants and nice blouse (for women). Environment was energetic. After activities, a few candidates were selected and continued with 'traditional' interviewing. Other candidates were dismissed.

    Interview Questions

    • Provide a situation where you had to resolve a conflict?   1 Answer

  7. Helpful (6)  

    Project Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Interview

    I participated in a group interview composed of activities intended to see how participants interact with each other, and who displayed natural "leader" behavior. Following this, resumes were collected from participants, and 3 were chosen to immediately participate in formal face to face interviews. I was chosen for this, and the three of us interviewed at the same time with a panel of 4. This interview was very intense in nature, and we felt like we were being grilled. This was the final step in the hiring process.

    Interview Questions

    • Tell me about a time you did not feel supported by your co-workers or team members   Answer Question
  8. Helpful (1)  

    Project Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 2+ weeks. I interviewed at Baylor Scott & White Health.

    Interview

    I submitted my resume through a current employee, and was invited to the monthly group interview. The first hour (as stated below) was a case study, which wasn't too bad (just a lot of writing, a little stressful, and with no feedback). The second two hours were team-based problem solving games & puzzles, designed to see how you work with people. It was actually kind of fun. There were observers the entire time, but it was easy to focus on the tasks & forget they were there.
    The group (there were 11 of us) then were treated to lunch, and let to wait in a conference room for an hour while the observer team deliberated. (The comparison to American Idol Hollywood Week cracks me up--it's so true!) At the end of the hour, the IS director came in, thanked everyone for participating, and announced who would be staying for continued interviews (1 out of the 11).
    I was the one. I then went up to the PMO for two interviews--one with a few team members, one with the IS director. They were enjoyable conversations, but clearly focused on my preparation & knowledge. This took another 90 min or so--all told, I was onsite for 6.5 hours.
    I interviewed on a Friday, and received word on Monday morning that I wasn't judged to be a good fit for their needs, and would progress no further.

    Interview Questions


  9.  

    Project Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Temple, TX
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Baylor Scott & White Health (Temple, TX) in December 2013.

    Interview

    PMO will contact you if you are selected for the next round, a group interview. After the 4 hour process, if you are still in the running you will be asked to stay for a traditional interview. In my group 1 of 19 made it.

    Interview Questions

    • As a seasoned PM, I found it very enjoyable. I apparently was not what they where looking for.   Answer Question

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