Blizzard Entertainment Software Engineer Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Blizzard Entertainment Software Engineer Interview Questions

Updated Apr 10, 2017
13 Interview Reviews

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Helpful (1)  

Software Engineer Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate
No Offer
Negative Experience
Easy Interview

Application

I applied through a recruiter. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Blizzard Entertainment in March 2017.

Interview

A recruiter at Blizzard reached out to me after having last applied to Blizzard about a year ago. I responded back and sent him my latest information + resume. Two weeks after, he followed up with a request for my number and some more information and wanted to set a time to chat with me over the phone. I sent him that information along with some times that I was available, but it took over a week again for me to get a response back. This time, things changed and instead I would be doing a HackerRank test. After doing the test I got response back saying they would not be moving on. This was easily one of the most frustrating experiences I've had with a recruiter, especially one that reached out to me first after a fairly long period of time. It took over a month just to get one test done.

Interview Questions

Other Interview Reviews for Blizzard Entertainment

  1. Helpful (5)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Blizzard Entertainment in April 2016.

    Interview

    I was contacted by a recruiter with a position in mind after I gave my resume to the hiring manager. After discussing if I was interested in the position, we proceeded to a phone interview.

    The phone interview was straightforward. Some behavior questions, some technical questions, and some software engineer questions directly related to the job I was applied for. A day after the phone interview, I was informed Blizzard wanted me to come onsite.

    The list that the recruiter gives you will detail your day better than I can (the process seems to differ based off different job postings). I arrived and was ushered into a small office with a computer. I had about 1-1.5 hours to complete a written test. Once I was done, I received a tour of the Blizzard campus. After the tour was done, I was brought in front of several lead engineers and the tech director for the project. They proceeded to let me explain myself on answers I gave on the written test. Once that was done, I went to lunch with some potential coworkers. After lunch, we had a long interview discussing how I would approach different software engineer problems specifically related to the job I was applying for.

    Once that was finished, I had a chance to sit down with my recruiter before leaving.

    Interview Questions

    • Why do you want to work at Blizzard? All the tech questions were under NDA.   Answer Question

  2. Helpful (12)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in San Diego, CA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 1 day. I interviewed at Blizzard Entertainment (San Diego, CA) in March 2016.

    Interview

    The interview consisted mainly of a behavior interview. The interviewer was friendly and asked various questions about past experience to see what projects I have worked on and if my past experience in software engineering was a good fit for the position. The interview was not difficult. However, I would advise to prepare for the interview by writing down what you plan to talk about when asked about your experience in order to best describe yourself as a fit for the job.

    Interview Questions


  3. Helpful (26)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Irvine, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 3+ months. I interviewed at Blizzard Entertainment (Irvine, CA).

    Interview

    I was contacted by a recruiter about 2 months after I submitted an online application. The recruiter and I worked out a time for a phone interview the following week. I was contacted the following week by 3 SW engineers/game developers. The interview started with a pretty standard phone screen. There were some technical questions related to the job description, questions on what I did for work, and questions on why I wanted to work at Blizzard. The interviewers were straight forward, a bit quiet, but seemed to really love their job.

    After the phone screen, I was given a take home assignment to complete and turn in the following the day that was quite difficult (it was similar to a project one would encounter in an upper division class CS class) despite being told it would take a few hours. I correctly implemented the project and submitted it the next day. After a few days, a technical recruiter contacted me. As others have said, the recruiter's main question and concern was over expected salary. The recruiter's tone of voice was that of a greasy, shady car salesman and after telling him a salary range typical of mid-level developers (even on the lower end), he made a passive aggressive statement that I should do research on the average salary range of the Irvine area before coming up with a final answer. This is bizarre since most Fortune 500 companies and other tech companies negotiate salary after acquiring talent due to having large resources and income to acquire employees.

    I was contacted the next week and the recruiter told me they wanted to fly me down for an interview since I did good in the interview and coding project, but immediately the salary expectation was brought up as if this was another "test" I had to pass. I told him a lower range for the base salary (low relative to what other mid level SW engineers earn in the area) but this value did not seem good enough for him, and he appeared to greatly annoy him. The tone of his voice immediately became more aggressive. The recruiter tried tried to inform me the salary range was typical of what senior engineers would make (it's not for the OC area if you actually perform the research using Glassdoor and other related job websites) and tried to sell me on lowering my salary expectations since there was profit sharing, 401k matching, vacation, and tuition assistance, which are all really standard perks of most big Fortune 500 companies. I agreed to his suggestion of the lowered base salary range and thought I would negotiate later on. The recruiter said they would love to fly me down but I had a feeling that this salary quibble would play negatively against me. I was left in the dark for about 5 weeks until I finally received an email informing me I would not fly down for an interview.

    The take home lesson is if you really want to work for Blizzard, pass the technical interview AND give the salary range they expect, which seems to be lower relative to the other tech companies in the area. Be weary of shady, greasy recruiters trying to chastise you for expecting an average SW engineer salary; the demand for SW engineers is very high in OC, LA, and SD (not only the Silicon Valley) and such demand should be met with good pay for engineers.

    Interview Questions

    • The technicals questions were directly related to the job description. The coding project is a bit random but from my experience and reading other reviewers, it's usually relevant to the job position or what the engineers who interview you do.   Answer Question

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  5. Helpful (21)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Blizzard Entertainment in February 2015.

    Interview

    The process started when I applied for a position through the online Blizzard Careers website. I was eventually contacted (months later) to schedule a phone interview.

    The first phone screen was focused around work experience, resume information, and behavioral type questions. Basically, it was a standard non-technical phone interview without anything special.

    The second phone screen was focused around technical work experience, some resume information, and detailed questions of things like algorithms, data structures, and technologies used in work experience. No coding was required.

    Then I was sent a Microsoft Word document which described an application that I was tasked to create over the course of 7 days. The application had many different requirements, constraints, and some areas for bonus points. It was expected that the resulting application should be "production-ready" material with unit tests, exception handling, logging, serialization, and more. Expecting someone to hit all these points in 7 days (especially those of us with a full time job) is a little ridiculous. I spent a ton of my own free time finishing this application with great detail. After submitting the application, I received absolutely no response from the recruiter or anyone at Blizzard. As usual, none of the points of contact responded to any communication when I ask for an update.

    I will assume that I was rejected.

    Interview Questions

    • Create a web application that allows a user to manage their World of Warcraft characters   1 Answer

  6. Helpful (29)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Declined Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Blizzard Entertainment.

    Interview

    Getting to the interview was a bit of a mess. Several of my communications with the recruiter about my goals for the interview were seemingly ignored. This meant I was shoehorned into an interview that was not the best match for my skills and goals.

    The phone interviews were direct, no-nonsense affairs that seemed to work well as a first evaluation.

    The on-site interview itself was efficient. There was a programming quiz in the morning, then an afternoon debrief and multiple interview sessions. The people were friendly and all were gamers. They asked good questions about all aspects of game development, and made sure I had time to ask my own questions.

    They made it pretty clear that they thought a person was lucky to have the opportunity to work for Blizzard. I unfortunately got the sense repeatedly throughout the day that my individuality would not be valued or respected, but that instead I would be added as a mere cog in the machine.

    Interview Questions

    • The programming test defined a data structure incorrectly. I solved the problem as defined, but the debrief ran into a roadblock because the programmers were expecting a solution based on a different definition of that data structure. Once I realized that had happened, I tried to come up with a solution on the spot. This was a good opportunity to show my ability to think on my feet, but involved some awkward back and forth as neither set of folks realized the disconnect right away.   Answer Question

    Reasons for Declining

    As others here have stated, the offered compensation package was laughable. After accounting for the ridiculous cost of living in SoCal, it would have meant a 50% pay cut to take the job. I may still have considered it since Blizzard games are so good, but I also didn't feel very encouraged by the attitudes I detected during my interview day, and the thought of plugging myself into the WoW machine for the next several years of my career didn't sound very appealing compared to working on the other cool projects at the company.


  7. Helpful (10)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Irvine, CA
    Declined Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 2 days. I interviewed at Blizzard Entertainment (Irvine, CA) in September 2014.

    Interview

    The interview process was stretched over two days for me. I was asked to come on site where I was given a knowledge exam, followed by five coding questions, followed by a white board question. Though everyone was nice, they all had this aura that you'd better be grateful to work at Blizzard. Very sub-par compensation.

    I have no desire to work in the games industry, Blizzard was just for practice, but I can safely say they are, by far, the most disorganized company I've interviewed with.
    My interview was stretched over two days because the recruiting team and the engineering team couldn't coordinate to figure out the right time. The recruiter got the time wrong, and I wasn't informed AT ALL until when the first interview was supposed to end. Turns out they never bothered to let me know that the interview was supposed to go on for another hour and a half; they just expected me to not have to do anything afterwards!

    The knowledge exam is the same one given to senior level staff, so a lot of the questions seem very daunting. Overall this area wasn't too bad. The coding questions which followed this exam were not too difficult, but the instructions were delivered improperly! The team mentioned that they didn't want you using C library functions, but then they realized that they didn't mention that in the instructions. That doesn't reflect well on the team if you leave a candidate alone with incorrect instructions...

    The team was fairly knowledgeable in C++, no issues there. They were actually pretty personable, although only two of them were really professional. Definitely not a culture fit. They had to nitpick one area of my code which was technically correct; they wanted to make sure that I could explain a certain variation of a keyword which would have made no difference in the program. This wasn't out of place necessarily, but give how poorly they ran the interview I'm surprised they used up time for this.

    The only reason I returned a few days later is because I wanted to see what their whiteboard question was, as that's the area I want to practice the most. The question didn't involve any coding, but more of a "how would you do this?" scenario. Overall it was a decent question, although the team's attempts to be funny came off as weird.

    The company did not come off well at all, and I can imagine it would bother me a lot more if I actually wanted to work in this industry. As it is, the company seems to ride off of a programmer's passion while underpaying them.

    Interview Questions


  8. Helpful (5)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 2+ months. I interviewed at Blizzard Entertainment (San Francisco, CA) in May 2014.

    Interview

    I submitted my application through the careers site, and three weeks later I got an email from a recruiter wanting to set up a phone interview. The phone interview was a week later, and was with the hiring manager and another engineer. We talked about experience, the position, my background, and what they were looking for. There were some technical questions related to the position, and two programming questions that I answered in a shared google doc.

    Another week later, I heard back that they wanted to bring me for an on-site interview. From that point, it took three weeks for them to get it scheduled, with several phone calls and emails to the recruiter just to get a status update as to what was going on.

    The on-site was chaotic, but all the employees were nice enough. The schedule got changed at the last minute, meaning lunch got cut short in order to accommodate people's schedules, and things became very disjointed. I understand that things change, but it's a discomforting to have the entire schedule shifted when you arrive, and then the programming piece ended up being split between two separate time slots which really messed with the flow. Some folks felt like they were just stalling to fill time, while others were rushing through, because that had other meetings to go to. In the end, I was out of there an hour earlier than the original schedule said.

    After that, I never heard another word back. I called and emailed the recruiter several times over the following few weeks, but never got any response. I found this unprofessional, given that I had actually come in for an on-site. I can understand not responding to every phone interview, but if someone makes it past that stage, the least you can do is let them know the status of their application.

    Interview Questions

    • NDA - just know your algorithms, data structures, etc., as well as skills relevant to the position.   Answer Question

  9. Helpful (33)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    Declined Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 2+ weeks. I interviewed at Blizzard Entertainment.

    Interview

    Out of many companies that I have interviewed with in my life, this company in particular has quite a disorganized and horrible method of hiring people. It seems that they have an added step before a phone interview and in-person interview come into the picture. Nothing too unfair so far. It gets interesting...

    For the positions that I got considered for in this company, they sent me an "email test". One is supposed to complete the email test which may consist of (in my experience): Coding (technical) question and several Gaming questions. There may be more than one coding problems and don't assume that this will be done in an hour or so. Coding question (atleast in my case), were either more than 1, or required many hours of development time. You may or may not be timed for completing this test. Catch is that you don't know what they're looking for exactly in the gaming and technical questions. So your answers are just your best effort with a great approximation. It is not like a phone or in-person interview where you can go back and forth until have you have the complete understanding of the question. They just won't speak with you until you have passed this test. After spending hours and hours of development time, you may be told the standard answer "After a "careful review", we have decided to consider other candidates, blah blah". I must beware you: I have seen the cases where a developer spent several days to get everything perfect, sent the test and within a few minutes or barely an hour, received a standard rejection email. Makes one wonder, what was missing there in that idiot test. Several hours/days of your life gone, before you even speak with a person about your job, what the job type is, what the responsibilities are, what work does team do etc etc etc.

    After you have passed this obscure test by making the right guesses about what they've been looking for, you will be asked to provide a time for a phone interview. Questions here may depend on your position type and your luck. I am not going to reveal the questions.

    If you have somehow managed to pass this round too, now will come the fun part. You will be told to fill out an employment form and a permission to do background check (even before you are hired and before you have gone for a 1:1 interview). You will be asked to provide an EXACT EXPECTED SALARY. Not expected range, not any other answer. An integer value which is meant to work against you. You will be kept completely in dark about what they offer (not even a range), what the job responsibilities are, you have not even met the team, you are not even told in some cases if the job position is basic, mid level or senior because the position that they may hire you for, may change based on your skills. You are given not even a hint beside what you already know....."Go look up online and provide me with a number". If you confront this by saying that you don't know anything about the position yet, you don't even know if there is a mutual fit or not and thus you would like to wait till there is a mutual fit, then you are bluntly told that if you can't provide with a number, they will terminate your hiring process right there and then. That is a BIG BIG sign of a type of company that you shouldn't consider (unless you're in a dire need of a job and will settle for anything). Technically, salary discussion does not even matter until a later stage because what if you're not hired after an in-person interview, what if you don't like the team, what if you don't like how the team is working or the person who will be your lead/your manager etc etc. A good company that cares most about a candidate (in my experience), never forces them to provide with an expected salary. But, this company requires an expected salary number with a threat to end the interview process immediately if not done so. So basically, no idea about the position title, no idea about the salary range because of that and no information from their end about a wide range either. Let us say, you're a nice one and you provide with a number, you're playing pretty much a game of Russian roulette. If you GUESSED the number that they like (or in their words, that they can afford), you're good. This just means that you have compromised your negotiating position. If you guessed a number that they don't like, you're done. No second chances, no discussion in general. Just standard email. Don't forget, this is all after you have spent hours and hours of development time in their email test, then prepared for a phone interview and interviewed with them on phone.

    I personally know that I will stay away from this sub-standard company. I personally would rate their interview process as incredible horrible for the amount of money that they make . It will be a sheer luck if they pay you well in progression of your career.

    Interview Questions

    • Their phone interview may contain any type of questions, technical or non technical. It will definitely include gaming questions, especially Blizzard games.   Answer Question

  10. Helpful (13)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Irvine, CA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 2+ months. I interviewed at Blizzard Entertainment (Irvine, CA).

    Interview

    Applied via the website and was contacted about two weeks later for a phone interview. Went through that with only one interviewer. Overall the phone interview was probably 50% general questions about me and my interest in the position, 25% technical, and 25% me asking questions of the interviewer.

    At the end of the interview, I was told I would be sent a programming test. I received that the next day and began working on it. It took me about a week to do, then sent that in. They got back to me about two weeks later for an in-person interview.

    Initially met with HR and they had me do a sit-down test. Obviously, I can't say what the questions were, but overall they were good, broad questions that should generally be easy to answer (except a couple that might require some thinking). Basically, as long as you "got" everything you learned at university you should be more than fine. Be sure to study everything that appears in the job description.

    After that, HR took me for a tour around the campus. The offices were very relaxed and well-decorated and it was a lot of fun. Then I went to a lunch interview with a couple employees, then met with two others for an interview in the offices, then one more (again, supposed to be two) and finally hung out with one last person and got to ask a lot of questions about working at Blizzard.

    I heard back the next week that I would be receiving an offer.

    Interview Questions

    • I won't give any specific examples. Follow my advice and you should be fine.   2 Answers

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