Causes Software Engineer Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Causes Software Engineer Interview Questions

4 Interview Reviews

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Software Engineer Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate
No Offer
Positive Experience
Easy Interview

Application

I applied online. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Causes in February 2014.

Interview

I applied online on company website and received a skype interview around a month from my application date.

Interview Questions

  • The interviewer asked me to write a program to print the minesweeper board for a given width, height and number of mines. The board setup changes every time you run the program. The interviewer was helpful.   Answer Question

Other Interview Reviews for Causes

  1.  

    Software Engineering Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through other source. The process took 1 day. I interviewed at Causes (San Francisco, CA) in May 2011.

    Interview

    They called me and just asked about my technical background. They also just asked a few questions.

    Interview Questions

    • What is the Big O of searching through an array for a specific integer?   Answer Question

  2. Helpful (2)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Berkeley, CA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 2 days. I interviewed at Causes (Berkeley, CA) in November 2010.

    Interview

    Contacted by an excellent contract recruiter retained in-house by the company. He spent nearly 3 hours talking with me to take the measure of my experience and personality as best he could, not being an engineer himself. Though a mercenary, he was a capable and intelligent headhunter, an asset to any client.

    He arranged for one of the company's more senior engineers to call me for a technical screen. I spoke to the guy a few days later, for about two hours, and found him personable and intelligent. Based on our interaction, he recommended to his colleagues that I do an on-site group interview with a whiteboarding component.

    I arrived in Berkeley and was made welcome by several staff members, and got down to business interviewing with the contract recruiter present in "fly on the wall" mode and two of the staff engineers, one the CTO-equivalent and one apparently junior engineer.

    The most senior engineer, a sharp and intellectually astute guy who graduated Stanford about 4 years ago, drove the interview. We spent some "getting to know you time," then got down to business. I was given a challenge which exercised my reasoning skills (about 80%) with only a modicum of programming expertise (about 20%). A well-conducted "But is he a smart guy?" challenge, and I plan to add it to my own repertoire.

    This was followed by a more experience-addressable question involving degradation of database performance over time, which I believe I knocked out of the park... mainly because the local crew seems to be inexperienced with data warehousing.

    Two hours into the interview, one of the engineers signalled the other for a hallway conversation, which lasted about a minute. They returned to politely inform me that they were cutting the interview short, and thanked me for my time. The recruiter, still present, seemed a bit shocked, and I politely asked what motivated the decision; I was informed that they had no issues with my technical grounding, and that I seemed a very interesting person, but they were looking for a very good "personality fit." In my case, I ventured, it wasn't the case that I'm an unsociable troll - far from it, and I have validation outside my own head to confirm that - but that I simply was "not mellow enough" for their team.

    Wow.

    This determination was made, I was told, because "one of [those] present" was uncomfortable and called the quorum. Folks, they have a cultural rule which requires unanimity of opinion during interviews, and any one present can veto continuance of the interview process. It's a remarkably naive way of doing things, and I'll venture they generate lots of interviews but few hires. It must be enormously frustrating for their recruiter.

    Of course, one can't fault them for exercising fine-grained control over their hiring process using any arbitrary metric of their choosing, but it is a rather unfortunate thing for them in the long run, especially given the special challenges they express they have at this stage in their development. But they're probably right about the personal fit thing: I was ready to leave much earlier when I found out they have an enormous code base, millions of users, but almost no software tests in place. I couldn't have made much of a difference in a situation that dire, I think.

    Interview Questions

    • You have a database with n normalized tables (the schema for which are shown on the board). The CEO complains that a particular daily report generated from it "is slow"; how would you deal with this issue?   Answer Question
    • Given a function rand_3() which generates 3 equiprobable random outputs, and the requirement to re-use it, how would you implement the function rand_5()?   1 Answer
  3. Helpful (1)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Positive Experience

    Interview

    Had 2 technical phone interviews. I was asked questions about myself and past experiences and then I was asked to write code. They have a very unique and fun interviewing process- they get you to write the code as you would in the real world.

    They were all really into the interview, asking and answering questions thoroughly, being encouraging, and actually getting excited when I got the program to work. The follow up email from the second interviewer was really encouraging and showed his excitement about the problem we had just solved.

    The position I applied for ended up not being available anymore (I applied over a month after the deadline so not too unreasonable) and one of the interviewers took the time to let me know face to face (over skype) instead of over email because he felt bad and wanted to answer any questions I had. They all seemed like genuinely nice people.

    Interview Questions


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