Facebook Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Facebook Interview Questions

Updated Sep 21, 2017
2,419 Interview Reviews

Experience

Experience
49%
26%
23%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview
30%
29%
21%
14
1
1
0

Difficulty

3.1
Average

Difficulty

Hard
Average
Easy

2,419 Candidate Interview ReviewsBack to all Interviews

Filter

Sort: PopularDateDifficulty

Filter

Sort: PopularDateDifficulty
  1. Helpful (282)  

    Data Scientist Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Interview

    One HR interview, one takehome data challenge, one shared screen with SQL and one onsite with several 1:1 interviews. They check your coding skills and product sense via the takehome, your sql skills via the shared screen interview and machine learning theory as well as product sense during the onsite.
    They let you choose the language for the takehome and onsite there is no coding on the board. So you just need to know one language (whichever you want, although I think they prefer R or Python) + SQL. No C++/Java/etc stuff and no CS algo questions.

    Interview Questions

    • Data challenge was very similar to the ads analysis challenge on the book the collection of data science takehome challenge, so that was easy (if you have done your homework).

      SQL was: you have a table where you have date, user_id, song_id and count. It shows at the end of each day how many times in her history a user has listened to a given song. So count is cumulative sum.
      You have to update this on a daily basis based on a second table that records in real time when a user listens to a given song. Basically, at the end of each day, you go to this second table and pull a count of each user/song combination and then add this count to the first table that has the lifetime count.
      If it is the first time a user has listened to a given song, you won't have this pair in the lifetime table, so you have to create the pair there and then add the count of the last day.

      Onsite: lots of ads related and machine learning questions. How to build an ad model, how to test it, describe a model. I didn't do well in some of these.   20 Answers

  2. Helpful (57)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Facebook (San Francisco, CA).

    Interview

    Standard computer science/algorithms phone screen interview.

    I've been a few years in my current job, and I have decided to try the job market again. My resume is impressive, I haven't padded it in any way, I've led software projects to release on time, and I'm finding it easy to get as far as phone screens, but no further.

    This isn't a criticism of Facebook itself, rather of the whole Bay Area software engineering scene - since the last time I went for interviews, there seems to be a much bigger focus on getting the initial computer science/algorithms questions correct on the first go. Miss an edge case that the interviewer brings up, you're toast. Misplace a < instead of <= in an iteration, you're toast even if you find it yourself. Take longer than 20 minutes per question, you're toast. Try to recreate from first principles an algorithm you haven't thought about since you graduated, or never, ever used in your work, you're toast.

    I've interviewed many people in my current job, and never regretted recommending employment to any of them. Every single one of the people I've recommended have made mistakes in their coding tests, and every one of them managed to find the errors when I pointed out that they had made a mistake. Perhaps I have lower standards, but when I interview, I look for how the interviewee recovers from a mistake, not that they are able to regurgitate something they learned from reading over Glassdoor interview questions.

    Or maybe I just come across badly on the phone. Hard to say.

    To recreate the process, go to leetcode and try some of the medium/hard exercises. If you can't complete it in under 20 minutes, and you have to redo some work to cover all the edge cases on submitting the solution, you can be sure that in an interview employers will thank you for applying, praise you for your impressive resume, and tell you no thanks.

    Interview Questions

    • Variation of standard algorithm question. Corrected code on being given edge case. Took 25 minutes to get satisfactory answer - probably too long for the interviewer.   3 Answers
    • Second question was a dynamic program question - I knew how to find the solution but hadn't even thought of the algorithm for several years. Was unable to complete the solution in the remaining 20 minutes.   2 Answers
  3. Helpful (79)  

    Product Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Facebook in February 2017.

    Interview

    I applied online and was contacted for a Product Manager position in either Seattle or Menlo Park by HR. After the phone screen, HR explained I could be hired on for an allocated role or go through the generalist process (where you would get to take a couple weeks after you get hired to learn about Facebook in bootcamp & choose a team). I chose the generalist process, and HR set up 2 45-minute video interviews (product sense & execution). After the video interviews, HR sent me an email to set up a phone call, which she then told me that they would not be moving forward and gave me feedback on what could have been improved.

    Video interviews were fun and I enjoyed talking to the interviewers. Next time, would definitely focus on having a process of answering the design question.

    Interview Questions

    • HR Phone Screen:
      1. Tell me about yourself.
      2. Why Facebook?
      3. What is a project you've worked on recently?
      4. What's your favorite facebook feature?

      Product Sense Video Interview
      1. Design a way for people to find apartments.

      Product Execution Interview:
      2. How do you deal with trade-offs between opposing metrics, such as higher AoV but lower conversion rate?
      3. For Facebook Groups, how would you increase usage?
      4. For Facebook Marketplace, how would you go about setting the price of the products? What tradeoffs would you make in the options you described in terms of metrics?   Answer Question

  4. Helpful (64)  

    Product Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 3 weeks. I interviewed at Facebook in March 2017.

    Interview

    As most others have noted, the interview process is a 30-minute phone screener with a recruiter, then two back-to-back 45-minute video interviews with lead product managers, one on Product Sense and another on Execution, and then onsite interviews. I did not make it past the video interviews.

    For the phone screener, the recruiter is just looking to make sure you've done relevant product management-type work:
    - Tell me about yourself
    - Have you ever worked on a product/feature you worked on from idea to launch?
    - How did you measure success of that product/feature? (provide examples of metrics you looked at)

    My Product Sense interview was with a product lead on Facebook Messenger. He quickly told me that he had already read through my resume and asked if there was anything else unique about me that wasn't on my resume. He then asked me about two of my favorite consumer products to try and suss out any commonalities across the two to determine what characteristics I value in a good product. We then moved onto the meat of the interview, the product sense hypothetical. He presented the following hypothetical: "Design a way for people with similar interests/hobbies to connect".

    I had prepped a structure of walking through the problem, the user, potential solutions, etc, but I struggled with this particular use case. His feedback was that I jumped too quickly into the solution, and that I needed to back up and talk about "pain points" in a bit more depth. Then, he provided feedback that I was getting stuck on pain points and needed to move onto the solution, as we were running out of time. I had 5 minutes at the end to ask him questions.

    My Execution interview was with a product lead on Instagram, working on safety/community. He briefly introduced himself and his role, and asked me to quickly do the same. He the presented the following hypothetical: "Tell me what metrics you would look at as a product manager for Instagram ads".

    We went through multiple follow-ups, asking me to prioritize which of those metrics would be most important, what to consider about how that metric might not tell the whole story, what I would do if I saw a sharp decrease in that metric from one day to the next, how I would rally the team around addressing that problem vs moving on, etc. I had a lot of fun here and thought I did fairly well with this interview, as it more closely reflected what I do in my current role day to day.

    My advice for the Product Sense and Execution video interviews:
    - Figure out how well you're balanced between these two skill sets.
    - If you're unbalanced, like I was, focus on the area where you are weaker
    - Identify a structure to use for either interview. For Product Sense, I would recommend: 1) Clarify the problem, 2) Understand/make assumptions about the user, 3) Identify pain points, 4) Brainstorm solutions, 5) Explain rationale/tradeoffs. For Execution, I would recommend: 1) Identify the proxy metric that most closely reflects the real-world change, 2) Identify related metrics, 3) Refine to reduce chance of "gaming" the metric, 4) Identify what questions you would ask if those metric(s) fell (external factors, internal to Facebook factors, internal to product/feature factors), 5) Explain how you would make tradeoffs to prioritize addressing the issue. There are various books and websites that can lead you through other ways of structuring your answers to these two types of questions. I'd highly recommend writing out a flow chart of your structure that you can refer to during the interview.
    - Practice hypotheticals out loud with a friend. It was extremely helpful to also refine any problems you might have with communicating your ideas. Take the flow chart you created above and refine it by practicing out loud with a friend. I found it helpful to create a sort of mix-and-match flashcards by printing out 6 starts to a question and combining them with ends of a question. I put all of the starts in one bowl and all the ends in another bowl, and had my friend pick from the two bowls at random. Examples:

    Starts:
    1. Tell me your favorite thing about...
    2. Design/re-design...
    3. How would you measure success of...
    4. How would you fix a problem with...

    Ends:
    1. ...a way for people to find apartments/meet people with similar interests/find something to do this weekend
    2. ...X feature of Facebook/Instagram (i.e. Birthdays, Messenger, Saved, Ads, News Feed, Trending, etc)
    3. ...your favorite product

    Ultimately, this interview process does a really good job at sussing out the skills that you've already developed. Prep can take you the last 10%, but if you don't have a firm foundation, it will be fairly difficult to succeed (at least in my experience). Trust your strengths and shore up your weaknesses.

    Interview Questions

    • Design a way for people with similar interests/hobbies to connect.   Answer Question
    • Tell me about your favorite product.   Answer Question
    • Tell me what metrics you would look at as a product manager for Instagram ads.   1 Answer
    • What questions do you have for me?   Answer Question

  5. Helpful (5)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Negative Experience

    Interview

    Did a phone screen, then a full-day interview loop, then was asked to do *another* phone screen. I had a great on-site (probably one of the best of my career; I got the correct answer to *every question* with time to spare), but it didn't matter: second phone screen was a disaster. The call was delayed due to a technical problem, the guy barely spoke english, and he was annoyed from the start. I got the DYHQFM early-end-of-interview signal despite writing a correct solution, and was rejected shortly thereafter.

    Overall, Facebook's interview process is marginally more humane than the other big players, but just as idiotic and random. Solving the problems and correctly writing them on a whiteboard whilst singing and dancing is insufficient -- if you make *any* mistakes, you will fail. If an interviewer is having a bad day, you will fail. If an interviewer doesn't feel like doing interviews today, you will fail. If someone feels like failing you because you're too old or not wearing a hoodie or they don't like your voice, you will fail.

    The recruiters will tell you all sorts of nonsense about how people are looking for "how you think" and that they understand that candidates are nervous and blah, blah blah...these are lies. It's random, and it's biased strongly toward failure. You're probably going to fail, regardless of performance. Basically, if you're demonstrably a really good engineer, flip a coin seven times. If you get all heads, you get a job. Otherwise, you fail.

    I'm tired of hearing Facebook complain about not being able to find qualified people. They probably reject more great engineers for random reasons in a single day than most companies see in a year.

    Interview Questions


  6. Helpful (1)  

    Data Scientist Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Facebook.

    Interview

    The recruiter contacted me via linkdin and set up a phone interview with one of the data scientists in facebook. It was supposed to be 45 minutes and the recruiter had already sent out a detailed email of what to expect. The interview began with a sql coding qs , followed by A/B test questions and how to track decrease/increase of metrics.
    I was able to answer each one of them but the interviewer seemed hardly interested and there were no follow up questions as if he didn't find me worthy of engaging in any conversation. My overall experience was bad and I could have cleared the interview had there been a better guy with more experience and understanding of how interviews are conducted.

    Interview Questions

    • Write a sql query to find out the overall friend acceptance rate for a given date?
      Table :- User_id_who_sent|User_id_to_whom|date|Action (Sent, accepted, rejected etc)   1 Answer
    • What would be your approach to check if the overall acceptance rate has decreased from 60% in may'17 to 30% in sep'17   1 Answer
    • How would you conduct an experiment to test if a change in facebook app is effective and what metrics will you look at?   1 Answer

  7. Helpful (3)  

    Data Scientist Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. I interviewed at Facebook in September 2017.

    Interview

    This was purely technical. There were no questions about past experience, areas of interest, or personality. I was encouraged by the recruiter to be prepared to "whiteboard code" and study facebook example interviews, which I did. They want to see your face during the interview, which is a little creepy, but beyond that I thought the interview was nice. The questions were easy. I think someone who has little to no experience, but has gone through some online training could probably pass this interview. For this reason, I am not sure why I wasn't good enough to get to the next round. I felt confident in my answers and thought we had a good up-beat dialog. I've never felt so good leaving an interview to be so quickly rejected.

    Interview Questions

    • 1. Easy SQL join and aggregation (can be done in your language of choice)
      2. Discuss pros and cons of using like-rate to determine system health
      3. Discuss what might cause average like rate to go from 70% one day to 30% another
      4. Explain how you would diagnose a 10% YoY "like" improvement
      5. What would be your next step to investigating why this happened   1 Answer
  8. Helpful (19)  

    Data Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Menlo Park, CA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Facebook (Menlo Park, CA) in July 2017.

    Interview

    One phone tech screen which covered both SQL and Python questions. They do the best job I've seen of hosting this tech screen / interview. They use CoderPad, and actually let you run the queries / functions. For SQL they provide a nice schema for you to reference. And for coding (python) they provide basic methods and reference materials for you to review if needed.

    I did very well on the SQL Questions, which are listed below. A plus is talking through what you PLAN to do before you do it:
    - for each store show the % difference in sales between 2014 and 2015
    - % of all customers that have purchases at least 1 product
    - list all the customers that live in a state, ordered by the number of unique products they bought
    - Find the earliest born and last born customers, by gender, who have bought at least 1 product

    I did not quite do as well on the python stuff. I was able to answer all of the python questions, but I received feedback that I should have talked through and thought through all the test cases they provide. So as to ensure you are working around all edge cases before starting to code. I got 3 questions, but forget the 3rd one. They two I remember were:
    - implement count_words(input_str) function which returns number of words from the input string (hint the edge cases they provide means you have to implement it manually)
    - implement count_substr(input_str, sub_str) function which returns the number of times the sub_str occurs in the input_str.

    On site includes 4 interviews. 1 Lunch interview which is focused on team fit, and finding out if you are passionate about the role / company. You'll want to be able to answer questions like:
    - what product would you want to work on, why, what would you do if you worked on that project?

    The other 3 on site interviews are "full stack" they focus on product sense, data modeling, SQL, data visualization, and coding (python.) You can make it into more of a conversation and it's a good thing to ask clarifying questions. You will have to write everything on a white board throughout the conversations, including data models, viz, SQL, and python functions. They will ask you to solve a specific business problem by coming up with a python function.

    From a guy that didn't get the job, it was still a good experience. They do a good job of making into a much more realistic scenario instead of just a "tell me a time when...." type questions. Good luck to you!

    Interview Questions

    • given a list of tuples of movie watched times, find how many unique minutes of the movie did the viewer watch e.g. [(0,15),(10,25)]. The viewer watched 25 minutes of the movie.   2 Answers

  9.  

    Data Scientist - Analytics Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Interview

    Heavy on Product Analysis, Basic SQL questions.

    The communication is not clear since it is a phone interview. The interviewer asked me about a product, then a couple of related questions.


  10. Helpful (1)  

    Industry Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in New York, NY
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    The process took 1 day. I interviewed at Facebook (New York, NY).

    Interview

    Very disappointed and surprised by how unprofessional this was given the reputation of the company. The HR contact was late to our call, asked me one question and took the entire time to tell me about the role (aka: simply read the job description), and then went radio silent.

    Interview Questions

    • Can you tell me about your background and how you got to where you are?   Answer Question

Don't Miss Out On a Job You Love
Upload a resume to easily apply to jobs from anywhere. It's simple to set up.