Facebook Interview Questions in San Francisco, CA | Glassdoor

Facebook Interview Questions in San Francisco, CA

Updated Jun 21, 2017
681 Interview Reviews

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  1. Helpful (82)  

    Data Scientist Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Menlo Park, CA
    Declined Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 6 weeks. I interviewed at Facebook (Menlo Park, CA) in February 2017.

    Interview

    I applied online in late December and then spoke to a recruiter for about 15 minutes in early January. I was scheduled for an in-person interview in mid January where I interviewed with one data scientist in a 1:1 interview for an hour for the first round. Another recruiter then called me for a 30 minute prep for the 2nd round. The final, 2nd round interview was about 5 weeks later in late February, with 6 data scientists over 4 hours in the afternoon. I got an offer but it was for a lot less than I was expecting, and we couldn't bridge the gap enough for it to be worth it.

    Everyone seemed relatively nice, although I could tell that a lot of the questions are really designed to trip you up, like they want you to miss some detail or edge case. My advice would be to pay attention to every little bit of minutiae regarding the question, make sure you're staying on task, write on the whiteboard, and explain your thoughts. Industry word is that data science at Facebook is not what it once was and is more of a product data analyst role now, so make sure you're really into Facebook products because that's what you'll be analyzing.

    Also, I didn't get a single question about dice, cards, or any other brain teaser type questions. All these mentions of NDAs are missing the point of Glassdoor, people can be a little more verbose than "various questions". You can't trademark an interview question or claim it's a trade secret.

    Interview Questions

    • How would you measure the health of Mentions, Facebook's app for celebrities? How can FB determine if it's worth it to keep using it?

      If a celebrity starts to use Mentions and begins interacting with their fans more, what part of the increase can be attributed to a celebrity using Mentions, and what part is just a celebrity wanting to get more involved in fan engagement?  
      5 Answers
    • There is a table that tracks every time a user turns a feature on or off, with columns user_id, action ("on" or "off), date, and time.

      How many users turned the feature on today?
      How many users have ever turned the feature on?
      In a table that tracks the status of every user every day, how would you add today's data to it?  
      7 Answers
    • If 70% of Facebook users on iOS use Instagram, but only 35% of Facebook users on Android use Instagram, how would you investigate the discrepancy?   5 Answers
    • How do you measure newsfeed health?   2 Answers
    • If a PM says that they want to double the number of ads in Newsfeed, how would you figure out if this is a good idea or not?   3 Answers
    • We have two options for serving ads within Newsfeed:
      1 - out of every 25 stories, one will be an ad
      2 - every story has a 4% chance of being an ad

      For each option, what is the expected number of ads shown in 100 news stories?
      If we go with option 2, what is the chance a user will be shown only a single ad in 100 stories? What about no ads at all?  
      9 Answers
    • How do you map nicknames (Pete, Andy, Nick, Rob, etc) to real names?   3 Answers
    • Facebook sees that likes are up 10% year over year, why could this be?   4 Answers
    • How many high schools that people have listed on their profiles are real? How do we find out, and deploy at scale, a way of finding invalid schools?   4 Answers

  2. Helpful (28)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Facebook (San Francisco, CA).

    Interview

    Standard computer science/algorithms phone screen interview.

    I've been a few years in my current job, and I have decided to try the job market again. My resume is impressive, I haven't padded it in any way, I've led software projects to release on time, and I'm finding it easy to get as far as phone screens, but no further.

    This isn't a criticism of Facebook itself, rather of the whole Bay Area software engineering scene - since the last time I went for interviews, there seems to be a much bigger focus on getting the initial computer science/algorithms questions correct on the first go. Miss an edge case that the interviewer brings up, you're toast. Misplace a < instead of <= in an iteration, you're toast even if you find it yourself. Take longer than 20 minutes per question, you're toast. Try to recreate from first principles an algorithm you haven't thought about since you graduated, or never, ever used in your work, you're toast.

    I've interviewed many people in my current job, and never regretted recommending employment to any of them. Every single one of the people I've recommended have made mistakes in their coding tests, and every one of them managed to find the errors when I pointed out that they had made a mistake. Perhaps I have lower standards, but when I interview, I look for how the interviewee recovers from a mistake, not that they are able to regurgitate something they learned from reading over Glassdoor interview questions.

    Or maybe I just come across badly on the phone. Hard to say.

    To recreate the process, go to leetcode and try some of the medium/hard exercises. If you can't complete it in under 20 minutes, and you have to redo some work to cover all the edge cases on submitting the solution, you can be sure that in an interview employers will thank you for applying, praise you for your impressive resume, and tell you no thanks.

    Interview Questions

    • Variation of standard algorithm question. Corrected code on being given edge case. Took 25 minutes to get satisfactory answer - probably too long for the interviewer.   1 Answer
    • Second question was a dynamic program question - I knew how to find the solution but hadn't even thought of the algorithm for several years. Was unable to complete the solution in the remaining 20 minutes.   1 Answer

  3. Helpful (6)  

    Data Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in West Menlo Park, CA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Facebook (West Menlo Park, CA) in June 2017.

    Interview

    I applied online and at a career fair - not sure which led me to get a call (after nearly 2 months). Scheduled a two-part phone interview (SQL and Python). In comparison, the SQL interview was a tad bit more difficult but both were very straight forward. The questions were along the same lines as the other interviews. Was invited onsite 2 hours after my phone interview was done.
    The onsite interviews were super interesting and a lot of fun. Knowing the product was the most important skill there followed by SQL and then algorithms (pretty basic ones too). The recriter offered me the job 2 days later.
    Overall the best part of this entire process (apart from the super fun interviews) was the people I interacted with. The recruiter and the interviewers were amazing, kind and respectful. I was given a lot of prep material before the interview and was offered a lot of help during. This was simply the best interview process I went through. Cannot wait to be a part of the team

    Interview Questions

    • Phone Interviews - covered by other interviews on glassdoor   Answer Question
    • Onsite - 3 full stack interviews: given a KPI, choose the right metric, perform ETL (SQL/Code) . 1 lunch interview - casual discussion where you learn more about working in facebook and the interviewer tries to understand if you are a good fit.   1 Answer

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  5. Helpful (8)  

    Android Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Menlo Park, CA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Interview

    It was a standard, not easy but not too difficult technical interview with an emphasis on recursion problems and code efficiency. The recruiters are very prompt and on your side, so use them to your advantage. The interviewers were smart and quite nice too, which reflects the good culture of the eng org.

    1. Short recruiter call
    2. 30-45 minute phone screen. Coding questions followed by some Q/A where you can ask dev some questions.
    3. Onsite interview consisting of 4 interviewers, approx 45 min each. A) Coding question B) Architecture question C) Behavioral questions with small coding question, and D) more coding questions.

    Tip
    1. Use helper methods to keep your code clean. You may not actually need to code them out, saving you valuable time.

    Interview Questions

    • 1A. Given a sorted array of integers, make a binary search tree out of it. Solution is recursive.
      1B. What if you're passed a sorted linked list instead of a sorted array? Make a binary search tree out of this now. Solution is recursive.
      2. Compute the diameter (look up the definition) of a binary tree. Solution is recursive.
      3. Architecture - design the news feed from an Android client point of view.
      4. Given a dictionary of strings -> translations, translate an input string. Translations may overlap. For ex: 1->A, 11->B, 111->C. Solution is recursive and involves preprocessing the input dict.
      5. Given a queue of jobs, their runtime, and a cool down town, return the total time to finish the jobs. Input could be: A->3,B->2,A->3,A->3 and cool down of 2 after each job. Solution is iterative (and quite simple).
      6. Print a binary tree vertically aligned, where a node, it's right child's left child, and it's left child's right child are in the same group. Solution involves passing the groupId to each child. Right child will be curNode.groupId+1 and left child is curNode.groupId-1. Append in a hashtable<int, linkedlist> keyed by groupId.  
      Answer Question

  6. Helpful (1)  

    Recruiter Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Menlo Park, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I interviewed at Facebook (Menlo Park, CA) in June 2017.

    Interview

    I had a phone interview with a recruiter.

    A week later, the hiring manager emailed me to say she needed to reschedule our phone call. That's fine, except I never received a email from anyone letting me know of a next step or that I was scheduled to speak with a hiring manager. The hiring manager and I exchanged emails and scheduled ourselves to chat the following day. The hiring manager let me know she wanted to move forward and meet with me onsite.

    A week later the recruiter called and asked for my on-site availability. I received a confirmation email for a day/time I didn't provide and wasn't available.

    I contacted the recruiting coordinator and Recruiter by email to let them now of the scheduling mistake. I didn't hear back from anyone. I called the Recruiter and recruiting coordinator and left voicemails letting them know of the scheduling mistake. The following day the recruiter called back and said that it was her fault, she gave the recruiting coordinator the wrong dates. A day later, I was scheduled per my availability to come onsite.

    Onsite, my first interview was a video call, but the video didn't work. I had to find someone sitting near the conference room to troubleshoot, but they couldn't get the video working. The other interviews went smoothly. I didn't meet with the hiring manager I spoke with on the phone which was strange.

    I was told by the Recruiter she would sync up with the interviewers at the end of the week. I didn't hear back after two weeks.

    I called the Recruiter and left a voicemail. I didn't hear back for several days. I emailed the Recruiter to follow up again. A day later the recruiter called and said she just spoke with the interviewers that day and feedback was positive but moving forward with others.

    I had a terrible recruiting experience every step of the way. There were errors and mistakes at every stage. I felt like the Recruiter could care less about my experience or her job.

    Interview Questions


  7.  

    Product Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Menlo Park, CA
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 6+ weeks. I interviewed at Facebook (Menlo Park, CA).

    Interview

    Fairly straight forward and clear. Interviewers are ok. Cleared the video but failed on on site.
    Execution is analytical. Product sense can be vague at times. Leadership was purely behavioral.

    HR is very slow. I also they they don't care to inform if you failed. I understand they have a ton of people and can't respond but atleast to onsite people, after promising to send a feedback within 3 hours. Horrible HR. Cannot believe why FB can't fix this.

    Interview Questions

    • Execution - how do measure X ?   Answer Question
    • Product sense: how would you use FB to improve X ? This can be vague or on a topic completely unknown to you.   Answer Question

  8.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Menlo Park, CA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. I interviewed at Facebook (Menlo Park, CA) in June 2017.

    Interview

    4 hour onsite interview after doing two, 45 minute phone interviews. None of the questions were incredibly hard, and were able to be solved within 30-45 minutes if you are well brushed up on your data structures and common algorithms.

    Interview Questions


  9.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Menlo Park, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. I interviewed at Facebook (Menlo Park, CA) in June 2017.

    Interview

    I received a letter from the recruiter in a few days, after I applied. Two days later there was a phone interview. The recruiter showed no interest and asked me to wait until she read my resume. She asked me just one question: "tell me about yourself", after that I received a verbal refusal. There was no technical questions nor what I'm interested in. "Unfortunately, now we are looking for people with 3-4 years of work experience". A few days later I received a letter of refusal. I did not expect such unprofessional behavior from Facebook

    Interview Questions


  10. Helpful (12)  

    Data Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Menlo Park, CA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. I interviewed at Facebook (Menlo Park, CA) in April 2017.

    Interview

    Was contacted by a recruiter on linked in. Told them I wasn't in the process of looking for a job, and hadn't prepared for interviews yet, and they told me that they would be happy to wait for me to prepare and interview me. Gave me over a month to prepare, before I did 2 45 minute phone interviews.

    Phone interview was pretty much exactly as everyone else explained. Note to readers: If you saw people who thought the interview process was easy, you also noticed that they didn't often get offers. They ask challenging questions, and expect you to explain your thought process in solving the problems. It was a challenging process, but very fair. I actually struggled quite a bit on my coding interview, but I did very well on my SQL portion, and because I communicated my thought process clearly in my coding section, they decided to move forward.

    In departure from what I have ever experienced, I got a phone call from a manager explaining the onsite interview process to me, what he was generally looking for in a candidate, and what the general process was like. It was a really cool thing, I really felt like they wanted me to succeed, and that they weren't actively rooting against me.

    The onsite was 3 full stack interviews. There were some questions that were pretty tough, but it was a realistic interview that really tested how you'd think and perform on a day to day basis.

    Interview Questions

    • Pretty much in line with what other people have been asked.   23 Answers

  11. Helpful (3)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Menlo Park, CA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. I interviewed at Facebook (Menlo Park, CA) in April 2017.

    Interview

    I was contacted by a Facebook recruiter via LinkedIn and within a few days had non-technical 30 minute phone interview, after which we scheduled a first technical interview that could be done in person or over the phone. Since I live in the area I opted to do it in person at the Menlo Park facility. The recruiter supplied me with links to several sources of preparation materials, and asked for dates which I might be ready for my first technical interview. I opted for a date two weeks from the phone screening.

    On the day of the interview I was greeted at Facebook by the recruiter, who showed me around the campus, which consists of 16+ buildings and has lots of amenities. The recruiter brought me to a small meeting room with two whiteboards and a few minutes later the interviewer showed up, accompanied by an observer. The first thing they did was ask me about any current projects I'm working on, and about the tech stack I use. After talking about that for a few minutes they presented me with a coding problem, which I could do in a language of my choice.

    I have not done many of the typical coding challenge problems you might see on LeetCode or similar sites. I was relying on experience and my ability to work through a problem. I read somewhere that interviewers care more about how you approach a problem than how well you can churn out memorized material, so I thought I'd be better off focusing on my overall approach and communication skills. In that regard I think I did well but after reading some other reviews, perhaps I worked too slowly and could have benefitted from doing more of those more academic coding exercises. I was given one problem and took the whole 45ish minutes to do it. I started with a very general conceptual solution done visually, and then wrote it up as executable code, while addressing bug and ways it could be made more efficient. Afterwards I was asked to execute the solution on the whiteboard as if I were an interpreter running the code, noting intermediate values and output.

    I did not find the problem very difficult but I wanted to make sure I stayed engaged with the interviewer and talk out the solution while working on it, which is not how I typically code on my own.

    Interview Questions

    • Do an in-place (without allocating any extra memory) rearrangement of a list of integers, putting non-zero elements first.   4 Answers
    • Do you have any questions for us?   2 Answers

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