Google Interaction Designer Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Google Interaction Designer Interview Questions

Interviews at Google

74 Interview Reviews

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Interaction Designer Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate
No Offer
Positive Experience

Interview

Resume and portfolio review; Chat with a recruiter; Phone interview with a designer; Design exercise; Hiring team reviews design exercise and portfolio; Onsite interviews; Hiring team reviews onsite interview feedback, exercise, and portfolio; Recruiter creates offer; Final Approvals.

Interview Questions

  • Can you walk me through a project in your portfolio?   1 Answer

Other Interview Reviews for Google

  1. Helpful (1)  

    Interaction Design Interview

    Anonymous Employee
    Accepted Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Google.

    Interview

    It was really slow and depended luck.... After passing the resume selection and design challenge review, I first got a round with a designer who are randomly selected to interview. Passing that general round, I was headed to team match and got 3 teams.

    Interview Questions

    • Behavior: How will you tackle with very vague project scope   2 Answers

  2. Helpful (5)  

    Interaction Designer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Mountain View, CA
    Declined Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 7 weeks. I interviewed at Google (Mountain View, CA) in September 2019.

    Interview

    Long and slow interview.

    I wish Google moved faster, it was the slowest moving interview process I had. I was referred into google and it took about a week before I got contacted. Interview was scheduled by the recruiter a few days afterward. It was a very simple phone interview. Basic information about design at google and basic questions about my story. I got an email I'm moving onto the next step that day.

    I needed to provide 7 dates/times for the chat with a hiring manager that was interested in me. The hiring manager call asked me to walk through pieces in my portfolio and had very specific questions. It was very clear he went through my portfolio thoroughly. Which was great. He came off really robotic, however, and it was hard to get a sense of how I was doing on the call. It was also question after question and clear he had a very specific number he had to go through. This might be google's policy? To seem unbiased? However, designers at the onsite were a lot more human :)

    I passed this round and was asked to move onsite (feedback within 3 business days). Before scheduling onsite I was asked to talk to two other hiring managers who were interested in me. It seemed like the recruiter was waiting for a "yes" from the hiring manager before proceeding to the onsite. But these calls did delay the onsite by yet another week or so.

    I proceeded to onsite with the team that I was most interested in at their location. This was great to actually meet with people in the pillar. I had heard Google made you interview with randos so I was happily surprised and got a better sense of the team. Onsite had to be scheduled more than 7days after the "let's schedule onsite" email. This was so you had time to work on your design prompt.

    For the prompt, unlike in the past where they reviewed it before inviting you to the onsite. They gave it to me and I just had to present it live. No feedback prior. Because of other onsites I had, I could only spend 3 days (the weekend) working on the presentation/challenge. My challenge did have some basic user research, online research, wireframes, one user test, and one flow in hifidelity. I'm glad they invited me without the review prior. It would have been disheartening to work a long time on it and get rejected without presenting it to anyone.

    Throughout this the recruiters have been really helpful and caring. One even hopped on a prep call before the onsite to calm my nerves/help me get an understanding of what was supposed to happen. Since my timeline was compressed (had other offers) I didn't know who I was talking to until I got there in the morning. Recruiter was super nice. She even sent me a good luck email the day before! If I had more time, I'm sure she would have been happy to review my design challenge.

    At the onsite I had 45 minute presentation for the design challenge AND past works. It was difficult squeezing everything in. They care about time so be sure to practice. I made note cards since you needed to do a video call and share your screen (won't see your google slide notes!).

    Google Slides was SO ANNOYING since all my other presentations were created with keynote. But it's suggested you work on google slides & because you need to send you presentation to the recruiter & they can share with the hiring committee. Do it in google slides even though it stinks.

    Then I had three 45 minute conversations with UX designers (including a manager) and they all asked whiteboard questions. One even snuck in a brief app critique. I had 1 "technical" interview with another UX designer but this was mainly tools, how I work, working with developers, creating accessible designs. And finally one non design session with a UX writer. She asked a lot of behavioral questions how I gave feedback etc.

    After the onsite, the recruiter contacted me within a day or two and told me things were trending positive and she was moving it to hiring committee. She messaged me right after the hiring committee meeting (that DAY, she rocks as a recruiter) and let me know I passed. However, I was down leveled to entry level. Since I had other competing offers I declined to go any further. If I didn't she mentioned you can try and re-level by having more calls.

    Interview Questions

    • How would you design a remote for a toy car?   3 Answers
  3. Helpful (3)  

    Interaction Designer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Mountain View, CA
    Accepted Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 9+ months. I interviewed at Google (Mountain View, CA) in May 2019.

    Interview

    In a word: exhausting. I'm a bit torn between saying it was a good or bad experience. I met smart people, felt respected, had a wonderful recruiter, and I'm really happy in my position. That said, the process was incredibly long with many hurdles to jump. From what I hear this is not uncommon. I was sourced for a role early in the year, applied and finished the interview process in late spring (recruiter call, tech interview, design challenge, onsite) and then for a variety of reasons chose between teams in mid summer with fit calls.

    The biggest surprise for me was that the process isn't really over even after you've passed the hiring committee. Depending on where you are in the year, your level, your area of expertise, your location -- you can float around in the pool of acceptable hires for a while (days to weeks to months) before team fit calls roll in without any guarantee of an offer. There is the chance that no fit calls will roll in, although I don't know that this is very common. While this was the case and isn't a secret, it's not stated very explicitly until you hit that stage, which I suppose makes sense as it could be demoralizing to work towards passing your onsite only to find you may not get an offer.

    I'm not sure I've been here long enough to say whether the process is good or bad, but it's certainly a marathon not a sprint, and more mechanical than personal at many stages. Working here and on my particular team I feel I'm in a very warm, collaborative, balanced atmosphere, but that wasn't always evident in the hiring process.

    That said, I felt like each stage and each person challenged me, and that's part of what attracted me. I'm grateful that it turned out to be worth it for me in the end, but it is, without question, a lot. If you're beginning the process the best advice I can give is know it will take a long time, and if you're dedicated to seeing it through then read up on people's medium posts, Google's "how we hire site" and values, watch their videos, check out the work and organization of designers you admire, do white-boarding and interview practice sessions with friends, and go in excited for the experience and learning opportunity regardless of whether you land the job. Even if I hadn't landed it on this go, it absolutely made me feel more confident and prepared in every interview with another company that followed.

    Interview Questions

    • We are told not to share these, but there really aren't any "gotcha" questions. I prepared with varying online question banks related to my field and general interview questions and that felt sufficient. Being prepared to tell compelling stories as examples was important. I'd definitely recommend going over past experiences so you can draw upon compelling stories to answer situational questions.   Answer Question

  4. Helpful (2)  

    Interaction Designer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Interview

    Initial phone screen with the recruiter went well. The interview with a "senior" designer did not go as well, there were a lot of assumptions on her end and the questions she asked were quite unfair and reeked of bias and judgment, which was completely the opposite of Google's values. It seemed like she wanted specific answers to open ended questions.

    Interview Questions


  5. Helpful (1)  

    Interaction Designer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Mountain View, CA
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 3+ months. I interviewed at Google (Mountain View, CA) in April 2019.

    Interview

    Applied online, recruiter contacted me, did design challenge, had 40 minute phone call with a designer, was invited to onsite. Everything was very slow, all of this took a little more than 2 months. The onsite itself was very exhausting, it was a full day interview in Mountain View with a 40 minute portfolio presentation and 5 hour long interviews.

    Interview Questions

    • How did you overcome conflict during a project?   2 Answers

  6.  

    Interaction Designer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Jose, CA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 3 weeks. I interviewed at Google (San Jose, CA).

    Interview

    I was approached by a recruitor first. A few days later I was given a design challenge. I can choose one from three prompts. They didn’t say how many hours I can work on it. They requirement was to show a couple of high fidelity mock ups. It was very time consuming.

    Interview Questions


  7. Helpful (1)  

    Interaction Designer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 4 weeks. I interviewed at Google.

    Interview

    Recruiter reached out on LinkedIn. Set up a phone screen with another designer. Then proceeded to the Design Challenge stage where you use Material Design principles to answer the challenge.

    Interview Questions

    • Using Material Design, help create a solution for one of these problems:
      A. Pet Search
      B. Wait staff review app
      C. Teacher/Student relationship app   1 Answer
  8. Helpful (4)  

    Interaction Designer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Mountain View, CA
    Declined Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 6 weeks. I interviewed at Google (Mountain View, CA) in February 2019.

    Interview

    Contacted by recruiters, who were all responsive, candid, and coherent. Can't speak highly enough of the recruiters who made every effort to prepare me for the process, from the high-level to the details. Did a phone screen, design exercise (which you'll need to put a lot of time into, expect at least 10-20 hours, possibly more), and then the onsite.

    Once you get to the onsite, temper your expectations. You'll start off with a portfolio review that focuses heavily on your design exercise, so be prepared to go deep on that. Expect interviews to be stone-faced, and don't expect them to pay full attention to your work or your slides, or even what you say. I found myself answering numerous questions that were addressed verbally, and on slides, throughout the presentation and even during 1:1's. The 1:1 interviews themselves are extremely scripted: the interviewers are sticking to a script, and they will make sure they ask all of those questions and get thorough notes on them. The problem-solving segment was especially rushed and contrived, we did a rapid-fire whiteboard exercise and an app critique within 30 minutes. It all felt glossed-over. Otherwise, questions tend to be theoretical and hypothetical, a lot of "what do you think about..." or "how would you handle..." type stuff. If it's supposed to be an exercise in navigating ambiguity, it feels more like a process of responding to absurdly open-ended questions that seem designed to get a sense of your mental model, not how you've actually done things. I tried getting concrete about it, taking more of a behaviorally-based approach and reference specific and deep past experiences, and that didn't get a lot of traction, so I just gave honest responses about what I'd do in these horribly generic situations they mentioned. There's minimal conversational flow, and if you wander off their script or don't quite check their boxes, it gets a little awkward. Sure, there's a process they're working with here that they believe works, and you're not going to change that, so just be aware of this.

    After getting through the hiring committee (your interview notes are handed to a committee, who will make a decision--and I was shocked to get a hire decision) you go into team-matching. Those conversations were all equally scripted and bland. Every manager I talked to was uninspired.

    Google has a very specific mold they want you to fit, though they insist that they're all about having a bunch of different people join. The people I met were all hilariously similar, so, whatever differences they claim to seek are likely little more than superficial.

    Interview Questions

    • How do you like the design process to go? What do you hate?   Answer Question

  9. Helpful (2)  

    Interaction Design Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 6 weeks. I interviewed at Google in February 2019.

    Interview

    Three days after online application, I got a design challenge. After a week of the design challenge, I was informed that there is an interview. The interview was mainly about one of my design project and behavioral quesitons. Two weeks after the interview, I was rejected. The interview went great and I can feel that Google reapect candidates' time and are willing to provide any help they need to have the interview or prepare for it.

    Interview Questions

    • What do you think you could bring to Google?   4 Answers

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