Google Interview Questions in Seattle, WA | Glassdoor

Google Interview Questions in Seattle, WA

Updated Aug 4, 2017
95 Interview Reviews

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  1.  

    Software Engineer Tools and Infrastructure Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. I interviewed at Google (Seattle, WA) in July 2017.

    Interview

    First I had a very light software screening that seemed to validate that I do know at least about what I claim on my resume.
    Interview after a week on site with 5 engineers (2 of them SETI)

    It was an amazing experience. All interviewers were very friendly. They made me feel way less stress than what I was. Questions and problems are addressed like two co-workers trying to figure something out.

    Interview Questions


  2. Helpful (2)  

    Product Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Google (Seattle, WA) in June 2017.

    Interview

    Telephonic interview followed by in person. I could not clear the telephonic interview. The entire process was professional and transparent. The recruiter gives you a heads up on the interview process , along with reference material which was very helpful.

    Interview Questions

    • Design a product. It could be anything.   1 Answer
  3. Helpful (4)  

    User Experience Researcher Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Accepted Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. I interviewed at Google (Seattle, WA) in April 2017.

    Interview

    The interview process at Google is well-documented at this point. One or more phone screens, an on-site with a presentation, it was all the same for me. I'll share info on a few other topics instead of repeating others.

    ***Getting an Offer in a Smaller Google Office***
    I could not relocate to a major Google hub like MTV or NYC and it was quite difficult to get an offer in a smaller office. I had a positive internship at Google and know dozens of people there and it was still a challenge. I had multiple false starts where I'd pass a phone screen (once I even had a positive onsite), only to hear that internal candidates had filled all openings in the office I was targeting and would I be interested in moving to California?

    Here was what I did differently this time. #1, I expanded my search to include more Google locations. Still no MTV or NYC, but I was no longer laser focused on one smaller office. #2, I contacted a friend on a relevant team. The manager was interested in me and re-started the process with an onsite. This was over a week AFTER a recruiter had told me that, yet again, all possible positions had been filled and I would not be moving on despite my good feedback. #3, After my onsite I ended up getting matched with a different team in my preferred office (huzzah) for a position that didn't even exist at the time of my onsite. It wasn't on my radar or my recruiter's radar at all. After that match, I effectively went through several additional phone interviews with the team, as the dreaded internal candidates were up for this position as well.

    So, get your foot in the door and do what you can to get to the team-matching point, even if you have to consider less desired locations, since new openings come and go quickly. Also, work your contacts. Don't assume that every team and opening is known to HR. In the same vein of getting your foot in the door, if you are able to relocate to a major hub for a few years, you can look to transfer to an opening in a smaller office down the line. This is clearly a popular course of action given all the positions I've seen filled by internal candidates.

    ***Competing Offers and Negotiating***
    I was also interviewing at another major tech company. I kept Google apprised of this and it definitely sped up the process. I got a competing offer before the Google offer and agonized over whether I should share the exact details with Google. The competing offer was very strong. Google also knew from my history with them that I didn't want to relocate (required by competing offer, would NOT be required by Google). I wasn't sure how much leverage I really had.

    I ended up sharing the details with Google before receiving Google's first offer. Google's first offer then beat my competing offer, via a lower base but more stock and a signing bonus. I was unable to negotiate this any further. It was a very solid offer at that point, and the recruiter told me going any further would require counters from the competing company. I didn't want to leverage either company that way when the offer was already in a good spot, so I accepted at that point. I think the competing offer, even in a different location, got me a better offer from Google than I could've gotten on my own.


  4. Helpful (2)  

    Technical Solutions Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. I interviewed at Google (Seattle, WA) in April 2017.

    Interview

    Was contacted by a recruiter on LinkedIn. Overall the experience was not easy. The first round was coding round and a few networking questions. After that, I was called onsite where I was asked system design questions and a troubleshooting question.
    After 3 onsite interviews, I was recommended by the interviewers for my file to go to hiring committee, where they felt the interviews did not have sufficient coverage. They asked me for one more round of interview. It was supposed to be focusing on Linux and web technologies but the interviewer mainly asked questions about Linux.
    The last interview which focussed on Linux was the hardest interview among all others. The interviewer went in depth that I was not expecting. it was more than one would expect of a junior system admin type questions For eg. in what cases can sigkill(and not sigterm) will fail to kill the process.
    The questions that were asked to me was a mixed bag of theoretical as well as conceptual questions. It was followed by some OS based troubleshooting questions and a system design question.
    After my interview, I felt I didn't do as well as I did in my previous rounds. After this, my application will again go to hiring committee which will decide my future prospects.
    The interviewer, in the end, said though my interviewer was not that bad(but it wasn't too good either IMO). I hope everything works out.
    Overall what to study for the prep.
    1) Networking
    2) Web concepts(though I wasn't asked much)
    3) Operating systems(linux) Need to have indepth knowledge of this.
    4) System design(2 /5 interviews exclusively focussed on it)
    5) Programming
    My whole process till now has taken 2.5 months.
    My only negative aspect of google interview process is that it is extremely slow but I guess that's because they have so many interviewees.

    It was really disheartening to get rejected in the last rounds. The recruiter gave the reason that they are looking for someone more experienced and I am a new college grad.

    Interview Questions

    • in what cases sigkill fails   1 Answer

  5.  

    Front End Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. I interviewed at Google (Seattle, WA) in April 2017.

    Interview

    I had originally applied for a separate position (Applications Engineer). Spoke with a recruiter for that role, who referred me to another recruiter when I asked about my eligibility for Front End Engineer. The second recruiterexplained the position (and others), the Seattle office, and Google's projects, and the expectations. Set up time for a technical phone interview two weeks later. Google engineer conducted the phone interview. Did not move forward to on-site interview. Recruiter called me back in less than a week to close the loop and give some welcome advice for the future.

    Interview Questions

    • A coding question emphasizing algorithms   1 Answer

  6.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Interview

    Had 5 rounds onsite at the Kirkland campus after phone screen. All interviewers were nice and smart (except one who appeared rude). Glassdoor and leetcode helped. Was asked some questions on C++ internals.

    Interview Questions

    • 1. Strings
      2. Binary Search Tree
      3. Greedy
      4. Graph search
      5. 2D Matrix   1 Answer

  7.  

    Software Engineer Tools and Infrastructure Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 2+ months. I interviewed at Google (Seattle, WA) in December 2016.

    Interview

    I applied online ( new grad) and the process took nearly 2 months. I got an email from the technical recruiter after 2 weeks to schedule phone interview. But I got the reply after a month after I sent around 10 emails. Finally they scheduled phone interview.

    In the phone interview (45 min) they asked me simple question using lists and multiple while loops. The interviewer stressed me on writing code within that short duration. Unfortunately I couldn't complete the code within 30 min and I guess that is the reason why I was rejected.

    Interview Questions

  8. Helpful (1)  

    Product Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Google (Seattle, WA) in November 2016.

    Interview

    Recruiters were terrible with lots of hand-offs, but on-site interviewers were nice. I think I talked to ~7 different people before I even got on-site, which is insane. It's very difficult to get feedback regarding areas for improvement... Google seems awesome but I'm not sure it's worth the hassle.

    Interview Questions

    • Pretty typical PM questions...   1 Answer

  9. Helpful (2)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Google (Seattle, WA).

    Interview

    I had multiple recruiter interviews about general HR stuff. Each one was about 15-30 minutes. Then I had one phone screen with a couple of technical coding questions. Pretty straight forward stuff that you can find in algorithm books. Afterwards I went on site to do the 5 interviews. Questions were more difficult than the phone interview but still not too challenging. They were not trivial and require knowledge of data structures.

    Interview Questions

    • Topics Included string parsing, graphs, some bit manipulation, trees   Answer Question

  10.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 3 weeks. I interviewed at Google (Seattle, WA).

    Interview

    I was reached within one week after I applied online. Everything moved quite smoothly. There were two technical rounds back to back. However I was sick for one week before the interview so the technical rounds got quite delayed. We coded via Google Doc. One week after the interviews the recruiter told me that I was not selected, which was quite reasonable because I sort of screwed up one round with more math. I also got a survey asking for my feedback on experience later. Google provided a prep doc before the interview and advice for future after my rejection.

    Interview Questions

    • Can't say due to NDA. But you should be able to know some discrete math, combinatorics, and elementary number theory stuff, which was why I screwed the first round up; You should also be able to do more advanced topics like backtracking and dynamic programming. But theses topics were not hard because they were standard and did not catch me by surprise. Math did. I'm an undergraduate so overall difficulty is high.   1 Answer

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