LinkedIn Interview Questions in San Francisco, CA | Glassdoor

LinkedIn Interview Questions in San Francisco, CA

Updated Aug 20, 2017
97 Interview Reviews

Experience

Experience
70%
10%
18%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview
32%
29%
26%
7
3
2

Difficulty

3.3
Average

Difficulty

Hard
Average
Easy

97 Candidate Interview ReviewsBack to all Interviews

Filter

Sort: PopularDateDifficulty

Filter

Sort: PopularDateDifficulty
  1.  

    Sales Operations Analyst Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through other source. I interviewed at LinkedIn (San Francisco, CA).

    Interview

    Phone interview with recruiter, phone interview with hiring manager. Possible excel challenge. Interview was semi formal. Basic questions. Position needed to be filled quickly. If offer was extended needed to start in two weeks

    Interview Questions


  2.  

    Account Executive Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. I interviewed at LinkedIn (San Francisco, CA) in August 2017.

    Interview

    I was referred to LinkedIn by a current employee. The recruiter wanted to schedule a 30-minute chat about the role. The role was in SF and the recruiter was in NY. This conversation was painful. She asked me the same questions that I would provide answers too and made it so clear she had a list of things to ask in front of her and was not even listening to my responses. You could tell I had to say her buzz words to make it to the next round, and I was sick of it. There was ZERO natural flow of conversation and felt so scripted and awkward. For me, this is a deal breaker, and I told her I was not interested in the position at the end of the interview. The first impression interview for a very qualified candidate should be treated as just as important as the last. You are setting the tone for the type of company you run. I've spoken to some amazing recruiters that actually know about the position they are interviewing for. This girl couldn't even answer some basic sales questions. No thanks.

    Interview Questions

    • Describe your current role, tell me about your position right now, what are your current responsibilities (asked all of these questions - even though they are the exact same), could you tell me your day to day in your current role.   Answer Question
  3.  

    Senior Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at LinkedIn (San Francisco, CA) in August 2017.

    Interview

    Started with a technical phone screen with two problems. One was a LeetCode Easy, and one was a version of implement an LRU cache. Pretty easy, and the interviewers were nice and seemed smart. I moved on to the onsite.

    There are five interviews at the onsite level. 2 coding, one with a hiring manager, one system design, one project overview. Coding problems were significantly harder in person than on phone screen. I don't know why they would do that. What drove me crazy is that I had a working answer (similar to his but not exactly what he wanted) and the interviewer wouldn't allow me to code it. He kept trying to point me to his solution. I thought the point of a good engineer is that we can come up with solutions on our own? I think that kind of interview process speaks poorly to their culture.

    The second coding interviewer wasn't paying attention. I described my algorithm, started coding, and he started correcting my syntax. However, he was correcting it to a different language. And then he said 'well we don't use that here...' Okay, I thought the point was that the interview is language agnostic? This happened in the phone screen as well (asked me to code in Java). After I explained no, I am not using Java, he stopped paying attention at all. He just browsed something on his computer (scrolling and scrolling, and occasional clicks.. kind of like how you would use reddit..). I said I was done. He ignored me. I said it louder, he finally looked up and then took forever to catch up. He seemed very skeptical of my solution. I looked up the problem later, and my answer was the top rated on LeetCode so shrug. I had never seen that problem before.

    I was very turned off by people insisting LinkedIn is a 'financially stable startup'. LinkedIn IPO'd years and years ago, and they were bought out over a year ago. One of the guys who explained he had only worked at startups said he didn't realize how political and redtapy big companies are. I'm guessing there's an internal push to claim they are a startup?

    Only one interviewer was a real jerk (the guy who didn't pay attention), but I don't think I would interview there again. There is a lot of ego.

    Interview Questions


  4. Helpful (9)  

    IOS Developer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 3 weeks. I interviewed at LinkedIn (San Francisco, CA) in April 2017.

    Interview

    I recently finished (and flunked) an entire interviewing sequence for a Senior iOS dev role at LinkedIn and thought it would useful to recap it for the next victim to come down the chute.

    If you pass the phone interview hurdle, you are passed along to a “senior recruiter” who, along with a travel coordinator, will handle your trip out to the Bay Area. You’ll get a list of the actual interviewers (and of course, links to their LinkedIn profiles) 24 hours prior to your on-site visit. The interview was officially scheduled from 9:30 until 4, but in a practical sense it went from 10 a.m. until just after 3 p.m.

    The coding questions I’m recapping below will apply for iOS engineers in both locations, but I’ll give my impressions about the San Francisco location. I picked San Francisco because I’d prefer to work in a city versus the suburbs, but in terms of practicality, keep in mind that Bay Area real estate (and rent) and the general cost of living is incredibly high compared to anywhere else you can choose to live and work in the US, and even more so within the desirable city limits of San Francisco. You may have a lot more options to choose from if you choose the Sunnyvale (Silicon Valley) campus, but the San Francisco location (a 20-something story completely brand new office tower) is incredibly luxe and modern. I went up to the 17th floor, sun-drenched outside patio at least three times and at the very end of my day, got to enjoy some fancy hand scooped ice cream up there as well (I think this happens every Friday afternoon).

    If you arrive early for your interview in San Francisco, ask the front desk person in the first floor lobby for the public WiFi password. Once you’re in the tower, there’s a separate guest WiFi network that you can quickly register for and get access. There’s two banks of elevators in the building (i.e. some elevators go to lower floors, others to the higher floors) with a stairway between the 13th & 14th floors of the building where you can switch elevator banks while you are touring. Interviews took place for me on the 10th floor of the building and they generally follow this model: a host manager meeting (i.e. the traditional part of any job interview), a domain expertise tech session (i.e. coding up a project in Xcode), a “talk about life at LinkedIn” lunch interview, systems design & architecture, and then the dreaded algorithms & data structure questions.

    My host manager was pretty young but had already advanced to a Senior Engineering Manager role after starting his career as an intern only *six* years prior (i.e. he was able to use LinkedIn as a rocket-ride to leap out of the contributing engineer ranks). He asked standard “why do you want to be here?” “what do you imagine yourself doing with your career?” type questions, and I got to (accidentally) learn some of the internal codenames for various iOS apps along the way.

    There are two different Mobile Coding projects you could possibly get hit with, and the candidate gets the choice of implementing it in Swift or Objective-C. The project I implemented was to create a table view displaying contacts loaded from a JSON file on disk. One tricky part is that the contacts had pictures loaded from remote URLs. While I finished my project within 45 minutes, the remote images were not nicely refreshing in their correct cells. I volunteered to subclass the cells to keep track of the URLs being displayed, but the iOS developer doing the interviewing & sitting next to my laptop assured me that he was happy with what he saw (which ended up being a lie — it was a minor, but harmful, strike against me in the end).

    Then came a “lunch ambassador” meeting (lunch in San Francisco is catered down on the 3rd floor I believe, while the gym & fitness facilities are on the 2nd floor). Unlike Google & Facebook, this lunch meeting actually DOES count to the hiring committee, so I chose a skimpy salad and tried my best to engage the interviewer about her life & career at LinkedIn.

    The next session was System Design & Architecture, and for the Algorithms session right after, there were two interviewers in the room with me which amplified the pressure somewhat.

    A week after my on-site interview, I got a message from the recruiter saying my interview summary was sent into a hiring committee and that they weren’t going to move forward (with -- thankfully -- a little constructive feedback: primarily due to my hand-wringing in the algorithms module but also not being able to get perfection with the programming project). The outcome was a big disappointment for me, but hopefully my experience flunking the iOS Developer interview process at LinkedIn will help you to properly prepare for yours. If you find any of my information useful, please let me know by clicking on the “helpful” link below. This helps to motivate me to be as detailed as possible in my interview reports. Good luck to you!

    Interview Questions

    • Given an array where the otherwise sorted values are split into two ranges somewhere in the middle (e.g. [5,7,8,9,1,2,3]), come up with an algorithm that returns TRUE or FALSE if any given number X exists in that array.   2 Answers
    • describe how you would set up a mobile client and the API it talks to to display the LinkedIn main page feed   1 Answer
    • For my phone (and Collabedit) question, I was asked to implement functionality matching the description of this API:

      /* This class will be given a list of words (such as might be tokenized
       * from a paragraph of text), and will provide a method that takes two
       * words and returns the shortest distance (in words) between those two
       * words in the provided text.
       * Example:
       * WordDistanceFinder finder = new WordDistanceFinder(Arrays.asList("the", "quick", "brown", "fox", "quick"));
       * assert(finder.distance("fox", "the") == 3);
       * assert(finder.distance("quick", "fox") == 1);
       *
       * "quick" appears twice in the input. There are two possible distance values for "quick" and "fox":
       * (3 - 1) = 2 and (4 - 3) = 1.
       * Since we have to return the shortest distance between the two words we return 1.
       */   2 Answers

  5. Helpful (1)  

    Manager, Customer Success Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Declined Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. I interviewed at LinkedIn (San Francisco, CA) in April 2017.

    Interview

    Interviewed with 2 separate recruiters by phone. The first recruiter was super professional and through in her explanation of the process and the types of questions I should be prepared to answer. The second interviewer was also professional, not as friendly and said she was concerned about my leadership experience.

    Interview Questions

    • What is your leadership style?   1 Answer
    • What is your experience leading teams?   1 Answer

  6. Helpful (4)  

    Account Executive Interview

    Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at LinkedIn (San Francisco, CA) in March 2017.

    Interview

    Great Interview process. Just be yourself. Everyone is super friendly and really just looking to get to know you. phone screen, phone interview. onsite interview two peer interviews then a 1-1 demo.

    Interview Questions


  7. Helpful (3)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    Declined Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at LinkedIn (San Francisco, CA) in March 2017.

    Interview

    Had a phone interview and onsite after 1 week. They are good at moving fast if you have other offers. Interview was hard with 2 Leetcode hard problems and 2 medium ones. (max lines on a plane) and (least common windowing). You need to be prepared for this interview. It is real hard, so create a plan for prep and try to solve as many leetcode problems as you can. IMHO you should be comfortable doing at least 250 of 500 leetcode problems

    Interview Questions

  8.  

    Customer Service Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at LinkedIn (San Francisco, CA) in March 2017.

    Interview

    This was a basic interview process consisting of two phone screens from the recruiter and the Hiring Manager. We had a great conversation on the phone and established success criteria for what they were looking for. We even discussed diversity on the workplace. The Manager discussed how they have a D and I program ( Diversity and Inclusion) in place that ensures diversity within Linkedin. I was invited to interview onsite and do a presentation. It was pretty simple. You can see the look on their faces and change in attitude once they saw me in the room. I am not a Millennial but older and have experience. They were polite but I can sense that they do not think I can fit into their environment based on the responses to my inquiries during the interview. A few weeks after the interview, the Recruiter ( Andrew) called me and had this weird and careful opening remarks about what i thought of the interview. And unfortunately, they've decided to not move forward on my application. At this point, I have lost respect for LinkedIn which brands itself in Professionalism and helping candidates find the ideal career. D and I does not include age diversity at Linkedin. This company and people are hypocrites.

    Interview Questions

    • What is your next career move?   1 Answer

  9.  

    Manager, Marketing Solutions Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 3 weeks. I interviewed at LinkedIn (San Francisco, CA) in February 2017.

    Interview

    Applied via a referral within Linkedin. One initial phone screen followed by another. On the second phone screen I got the sense the recruiter was not truly interested in me as a candidate. After two attempts of trying to schedule me with hiring manager and not being very responsive I got a response 7 days after my check-in to notify me they were moving forward with another candidate. I felt it was unprofessional to say the least - especially for being a referral from a noteworthy employee.

    Interview Questions


  10.  

    Senior Associate Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in San Francisco, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 5+ weeks. I interviewed at LinkedIn (San Francisco, CA) in February 2017.

    Interview

    The entire interview process was tiring and disengaging. Recruiter did not want to move with my pace and many a times had to reschedule because they could not schedule based on my availability.

    Interview Questions

    • Business acumen question. SQL data questions to test the data analysis skills. There was a takehome assignment where I was given a social network data and was asked to find top two users on the social network that had the maximum number of connections but were not friends.   Answer Question

Don't Miss Out On a Job You Love
Upload a resume to easily apply to jobs from anywhere. It's simple to set up.