MECLABS Lead Generation Specialist Interview Questions | Glassdoor

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MECLABS Lead Generation Specialist Interview Questions

Interviews at MECLABS

2 Interview Reviews

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Lead Generation Specialist Interview

Anonymous Employee
Accepted Offer
Positive Experience
Difficult Interview

Application

I applied through an employee referral. I interviewed at MECLABS.

Interview

Lengthy and very detailed, but each interview was different and you could tell was leading to something. There were multiple face-to-face interviews, multiple phone interviews, a skills assessment, and a personality review. All were fairly lengthy, but not too difficult to complete.

Interview Questions

Other Interview Reviews for MECLABS

  1. Helpful (3)  

    Lead Generation Specialist Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Arden Hills, MN
    No Offer
    Average Interview

    Application

    The process took 2+ months. I interviewed at MECLABS (Arden Hills, MN) in July 2013.

    Interview

    I interviewed for a Lead Generation Specialist position at the Minnesota location. The office itself has nice grounds, but is not in a very metropolitan location and was quite dingy. The interview process consisted of a phone interview with HR, a team interview with current employees, a Skype interview with a manager from the Florida office, and two assessments.

    Each of the interviews hard very similar questions and each interviewer had obviously not conversed with the previous interviewer about my qualifications. Their questions were almost all behavioral question types and large proportion of them were negative. In each interview they asked about a time when I had done something wrong, could not complete something on time, had a disagreement with a co-worker, or had a problem working on a team. In almost all of these instances I had to make something up, because I honestly have not had that many negative experiences in the workplace. I am hard working, I get things done on time, and I try to be as easy to work with as possible. In my opinion, that they assumed I would be able to answer all of those questions- and had truly had that many negative experiences- implies that they think having negative experiences in the workplace is typical, which was a big red flag for me.

    The HR interviewer was not able to clearly describe the job itself, which was a little disconcerting and it took about a half an hour. The team interviewers were very polite and fun but certainly not very charismatic or professional, and they were dressed and communicated in a frumpy manner. The Skype interviewer was very harsh and did not seem happy to be talking to me. He made it quite clear that he was not impressed by my inability to give strong answers for all of the negative-workplace-experience questions. He also framed questions like personal attacks. For example, “your assessment shows that you are…which implies you would be hard to work with, how would you manage this?” He was easily the most charismatic and well dressed of the interviewers, but because he was so negative and combative he was the least professional.

    The assessments that I completed were atypical, especially for a research company. The internal validity of one was clearly compromised by age. It asked basic questions that seemed to be targeting anxiety or preparedness in the work place. For example, “do you have emergency phone numbers written down near your phone?” Clearly, most people would say no, not because they are not anxious or prepared but rather because most people have cell phones.

    They sent me a rejection email stating that I was over qualified for the position and that they sensed I would not enjoy the job. At the time I felt down, but in retrospect, they were correct, in that I certainly would not have enjoyed the job or work-culture. I was also very overqualified, as I had recently graduated with honors after completing my thesis on evolutionary cognition, whereas one of the interviewers had the job I was applying for and only had a high school diploma. They strongly stressed the importance of intellectualism in the interviews, but I am quite sure that I was more intellectually and academically-focused than any of the employees. I certainly cannot see myself competing with any of them for positions in PhD programs or even masters programs in market research for that matter, which should be their expertise.

    If I had the chance to do it all over again I wouldn't try to impress them any differently- I just wouldn't apply.

    Interview Questions

    • Like I said above, many of the questions were negatively phrased behavioral questions pertaining to instances of conflict or error in the workplace. Be prepared to talk more about your negative work experiences than your positive work experiences. If you don't have an example of a time when you turned in something late, didn't finish a project, had an argument with a co-worker, or couldn't effectively work on a team, then make them up, because they probably won't believe that you are actually just a responsible, friendly, and calculated person.   Answer Question

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