Pure Storage Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Pure Storage Interview Questions

Interviews at Pure Storage

303 Interview Reviews

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  1. Featured Interview

    Helpful (1)  

    Engineering Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Mountain View, CA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 3 weeks. I interviewed at Pure Storage (Mountain View, CA) in September 2018.

    Interview

    I applied online for the job position. There was one HR phone interview followed by two technical phone screens within ten days. And then the face-to-face interview was conducted at Pure Storage (Mountain View, CA). All calls were set on calendar with proper reminders.

    Interview Questions

    • Phone interview with an online screen share at hackerrank.com (just to test the logic)
      Situational management question, role-play, etc.

      I enjoyed their office, interaction was quite intellectual and they respected my time.   Answer Question

  2.  

    Knowledge Manager Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Mountain View, CA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Pure Storage (Mountain View, CA) in December 2013.

    Interview

    This was very early on (only about 110 employees) so I was put through the paces. I met with the VP of Support, Director of Support, Senior Engineer, Technical Writer and Founder.

    Interview Questions

    • They asked me to cable the array   3 Answers
  3. Helpful (7)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Mountain View, CA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Pure Storage (Mountain View, CA) in August 2014.

    Interview

    Like others have mentioned the interview process begins with an online test. The test consisted of 10 multiple choice questions focused on computer science concepts and 2 programming challenges. The code for the programming challenge can be compiled and executed on the test website itself and one can figure out whether one's solution is correct. The entire test has to be completed within an hour. I actually found the test reasonably challenging, but not too tough or impossible to crack.

    After clearing the online test the recruiter promptly invited me onsite for 3 rounds of technical interviews. Each 1 hour interview focusses on a single question and several iterations to optimize the solution as much as possible. Many other reviewers have already posted the questions, I was asked the same ones, so I will not repeat them. Although the theme of the questions is known, the specific details are unknown and are quite challenging. I managed to clear the first 3 rounds and was invited onsite again for another 2 rounds of technical interviews. After this point I was notified that they were not going to make me an offer. I was really bummed because in my assessment the interviewers seemed pleased with my answers and I don't know what I could have done better.

    Overall the interview process was not very typical like other tech companies. I felt that the interviewers were so focussed on the problem that there was little opportunity for casual conversation. This meant that they didn't take any interest in knowing about me as a person, my personality, etc. Neither did I get a good chance to get a feel of how it would be to work with them.

    All in all it was a mixed experience. I thought it would be an interesting place to work if they gave me an offer. But I landed up getting a better offer elsewhere and am very satisfied in the end.

    Interview Questions

    • A very vague question about designing a configuring registry in which apps could save and retrieve specific key/value pair information. It was very hard to judge what the interviewer expected with such an open ended question.   Answer Question

  4. Helpful (15)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer

    Interview

    online assessment 2 coding problems and 10 questions in one hour
    1. remove all elements from a linkedlist that has the same value as the given value
    2.fix a bug of a code
    10 mutiple choice questions are really simple and have enough time to complete all of them

    Interview Questions


  5. Helpful (7)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Pure Storage in October 2014.

    Interview

    I was invited for an onsite interview in MTV after passed an online test and phone interview. Typical Pure questions which are mentioned by other guys. After the onsite, HR told me they don't want to give me an offer.

    Interview Questions

    • design a data structure that can retrieve specific key/value pair at const time complexity. The interviewer for this question is an indian guy. He is quite rule and gave some useless hints that made you feel more confused.   2 Answers

  6. Helpful (12)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Mountain View, CA
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 2+ months. I interviewed at Pure Storage (Mountain View, CA) in October 2014.

    Interview

    I applied online and was contacted by a recruiter in a month or so. I had an initial phone interview with the recruiter. Unlike other candidates mentioned, I did not have an online test and was invited to have the first technical phone screen which I passed. Then there were 2 more phone screens that went successfully, and finally, I was invited to on-site interview in the company's HQ in Mountain View, CA. The company paid for my flights and everyone I communicated with was very nice and friendly. I really enjoyed the interview process.

    The first thing I was asked to do in the office was to sign a non-disclosure agreement. Then I was met by the recruiter who showed me the office. The office was very nice and I liked it a lot. All the interviews were in the same room with big white board on the wall. I had 5 technical interviews as well as lunch "interview", interview with the manager of the team I was interviewed for and a closing interview with the recruiter.

    The questions were not really that hard and I think I got solutions for most of them (maybe not the most effective solutions though). Everyone seemed to be very smart, proud and happy to work for the company. At the same time they were all kind and friendly. They tried to help me with some of the most difficult questions and finally explained the solution if I did not get it myself.

    The manager of the team walked me through the office showing working places, kitchen, playing room, bicycle parking room. He told me about the company's rules and policies. For me it was like to be on another planet: no dress code, no time sheeting, no time clocking, no vacation policy, free food and drinks, a lot of other perks, possibility to choose hardware and operating system to work on. People are trusted there a lot. So almost everything is allowed, but the work must be done :)

    During closing interview with the recruiter I was told that I might send them the code with better solutions to the problems I was asked during the interviews as a follow up. I sent the code for 2 problems.

    Although, I did not get an offer, I feel this is exactly the company I would really want to work for.

    Interview Questions

    • Cannot share the question due to a non-disclosure agreement   Answer Question

  7. Helpful (1)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Pure Storage in June 2013.

    Interview

    1. Contact by a HR with job openning information.
    2. On-line test (An algorithm problem)
    3. Phone Screen, asked about virtual function and some other C++ questions

    Interview Questions

    • How is a object with virtual function stored in the memory   Answer Question
  8. Helpful (3)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Mountain View, CA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Pure Storage (Mountain View, CA).

    Interview

    Was contacted by HR about an opening. She seemed really enthusiastic and friendly, and I'd read great things about the company, so I decided to interview. The phone screen went really well; the interviewer was great and I answered the questions well. The following week, I went to their office to interview. The work place seemed cool. Something about the feel of being in an innovative startup.

    And then everything went downhill. The first interviewer asked me the most bizarre questions. It wasn't that they were hard, they just seemed stupid and pointless. He also grilled me with some follow up questions, which were equally stupid. To make it worse, the entire time, he had a condescending tone. Throughout the interview, I just wanted to get out of that room. He also claimed some things about standard C that weren't true.

    The second interviewer was better. The questions he asked were actually not bad. But he did rush me a little, I wish he would just sit back and leave me be.

    All in all, the first interviewer made this one of the worst interviews ever. They stopped interviewing me after the second round. They said I didn't have what they were looking for. What the company needs to realize that they don't have what most qualified candidates are looking for in an interview either: a good experience.

    Interview Questions


  9. Helpful (11)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Mountain View, CA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Pure Storage (Mountain View, CA) in December 2012.

    Interview

    I was initially contacted by a recruiter who asked if I'd be interested in working at Pure. I was wary about moving from Madison, WI to the Bay Area; I'd been in Madison for years and intended (at the time) to stay there. When the recruiter heard I was interviewing at Google (hopefully for the Madison, WI office) he convinced me to interview at Pure as well while I was in the Bay Area. He described the interview process: an online quiz, a phone screen, and an afternoon of in-person interviews. It's probably worth mentioning that, since I had just finished my degree, Pure would be the first interview I had done in more than a decade. Since my goal at the time was Google, though, I wasn't worried; I think that helped quite a bit.

    Before I go into detail, a quick summary. I found the interviews harder but more interesting than the other companies I spoke with; Google in particular to name-drop. There was less "do you have searches memorized" and more "how would you handle this situation". Very nice to see.

    The online quiz was interesting for its breadth; it asked questions about systems, compilers, and architecture. Not to go into painful detail, but it should be straightforward for anyone with a good grounding in computer science (not necessarily just programming). For example, can a CPU correctly represent 1/10 as a floating point value, or is there inherent rounding error?

    The phone screen was somewhat stressful since it touched on an area that I wasn't expert in - virtual methods and handling multiple inheritance. Multiple other reviews have already gone over the questions, so I won't rehash them again. My advice is to think about whether casting a pointer (from child class to parent class) keeps its value the same or not; this isn't something people normally think about but will get you on the right track. One amusing note - I passed the interview, but the interviewer ended with "I think we can end here". I thought I'd washed out - and at the phone screen! Then he went on to say he was looking forward to meeting me in person.

    The in-person interview came the afternoon after a long morning of travel, but the folks at Pure were very helpful in working out my schedule - with multiple plane delays. My first session was with the CTO and his infamous buddy bitmap question. I didn't find it that bad; while he was hard to read and not exactly friendly, he's no worse than my adviser in grad school was. I was used to not having my hand held, after all. More advice: think about corner cases, how you can push information forward through an algorithm to avoid having to calculate it again, and understand the costs of executing code at an assembler/hardware level.

    The remaining interviewers were a lot less stressful, and I was happy to see that they were focusing less on algorithms (I got enough 'implement a DFS!' the next day at Google) and more about underlying knowledge (how can you can screwed by concurrency) and the ability to work with people. I ended up in a very nice extensibility vs. security discussion that arose from co-designing a callback interface.

    Overall I found the interview much more interesting than any of the others I had later. I was a little concerned about moving my family to the Bay Area and joining a startup, but the folks at Pure worked with me to allay those concerns.

    I was called two days later (at the airport) by the CTO to let me know they were planning on making me an offer, and were very flexible in waiting until I had heard back from the other companies I interviewed with (which took a lot longer).

    Interview Questions

    • The infamous buddy bitmap question. Specifically, the ability to whiteboard some code and then determine whether it works or not given a number of boundary cases and other corner conditions.   3 Answers

    Negotiation

    I found that honesty worked very well - I was concerned about both the cost of moving from Madison to the Bay Area (which ended up being a significant expense) and the lack of a Mountain View-capable emergency fund. They worked well to give me a sufficient signing bonus to cover both.


  10.  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 3 days. I interviewed at Pure Storage in September 2012.

    Interview

    Overall, I found the questions to be very detailed and specific to what I was interviewing for, and the interviewer questions were clear. They gave me every opportunity to succeed, but didn't spoon feed any answers - if you don't know what you're talking about, they'll cut the process short rather than waste anyone's time.

    This was a tough interview from start to finish; the people I spoke to were all extremely organized and coordinated. I accepted their offer, and am glad that I did - I've found that the high standards apply throughout the company.

    Interview Questions


  11. Helpful (5)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Mountain View, CA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Pure Storage (Mountain View, CA) in August 2012.

    Interview

    Contacted by recruiter. Talked to founder to learn more about company. Did on-line quiz, then phone screen, then internal interview.

    Unlike many other interviews, where you spend a lot of time chatting about what you did and what you'd like to do, etc. - this interview focused entirely on coding skills. It was refreshing though I'm glad I had some previous interviews at other companies to practice coding on a whiteboard.

    I felt like everybody in the interviews was hoping I'd find the solution - nobody was rooting for me to fail (i.e. no ass-holes). They gave nudges when I invariably fell off track.

    Take the time to check your work with examples -- it won't count against you. Wouldn't hurt to practice doing coding problems on a whiteboard at home.

    The interview process is over-selective - Pure probably says no to candidates who would be valuable contributors.

    Interview Questions

    • Tricky problem relating to figuring out the value of a counter in the presence of race conditions.   Answer Question

    Negotiation

    The company was open to negotiating but didn't give much. Then again, I sent many signals indicating that I wanted the job. FWIW, company later upped compensation based on performance.


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