Red Hat Marketing Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Red Hat Marketing Interview Questions

3 Interview Reviews

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Helpful (1)  

Marketing Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate in Raleigh, NC
No Offer
Negative Experience
Easy Interview

Application

I applied through an employee referral. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Red Hat (Raleigh, NC).

Interview

Received call from HR within days of application asking to schedule an interview. They called after 5:00 p.m./while I was driving home. I returned call as soon as I got home and left message for recruiter. Never heard back. Received a form letter e-mail rejection one month later. Subsequently learned another co-worker at my company was hired for that position. Was HR recruiter just too disorganized and called me by mistake? Either way, left a bad taste in my mouth. Through the grapevine I've learned the pay they would have offered was $20K less than my current job and this role was a promotion one level up. So definitely not worth it either.

Interview Questions

  • When was I available to speak with them.   1 Answer

Other Interview Reviews for Red Hat

  1. Helpful (6)  

    Marketing Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Raleigh, NC
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 3+ months. I interviewed at Red Hat (Raleigh, NC).

    Interview

    I had extensive interviews that went on and on. I heard over and over again that there were two common elements of their culture: they are very collaborative and they move fast. For me, those two culture attributes collided. They collaborated so much that the interview process went on forever; anything but fast. I had over 11 different interviews and none of it moved quickly. I understand getting the input of hiring manager, their manager and a peer or two, along with HR. By then, the candidates character and experience is known and vetted. By trying to get everyone's option, they have analysis paralysis, and all that collaboration means the process then takes forever.

    What's more, after all those interviews it was hard to get anyone to respond for follow-up. I didn't get offered the job, which is okay, but at least have respect for the time we put in (almost 15 hours spent on interviews, paperwork and logistics) and have a quick de-brief call. In the end, I found out they wanted more experience within a specific sector. That was a frustrating answer, not because I didn't get the job, but that I told them my experience was limited in that sector from the very beginning; I never hid it, and I addressed it in all the interviews I had. If that factor had so much weight, I wish they had cut me earlier in the process versus wasting their time and mine.

    Then, I interviewed for another position, and essentially the same thing happened again. This time 6 or 7 interviews (some people twice). I was left a voice mail saying that I didn't not get that position because I again fell short of experience in a specific sector, which, again, I brought up from the very beginning. I know the company owes me no explanation, so I appreciate the initial call, and that they'd be willing to have a follow-up call to talk more. After that, not one phone call was returned. Again, if you're going to put a candidate through all that, please be respectful of their time (and that of the employees) to have a live 15-min debrief. It demonstrates respect and integrity. Between the two jobs, all in all, I think I spent 20+ hours interviewing.

    I'm all for collaboration, but you can't over collaborate AND have speed to impact. During this process, there was over-collaboration, that meant many valuable hours spent and decisions that were delayed. Which contradicts their idea of "moving quickly."

    This is a reputable company that I'd love to work for someday, so I'll likely continue to apply there, but I would tell anyone who's looking to interview that the process is detailed and very time consuming.

    Interview Questions

    • Standard questions: Background, experience to certain sectors, etc.   Answer Question

  2. Helpful (2)  

    Marketing Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Red Hat in January 2009.

    Interview

    Red Hat has a habit of contacting prospective employees and then not following up or returning calls. I have interviewed for 3 different roles with Red Hat in the past 5 years and have had poor experiences with HR. Hiring managers themselves have been generally pleasant, but HR is extremely closed and stand offish. If you are interested in working for Red Hat, I would suggest working around HR as much as possible.

    Interview Questions

    • none... questions were standard behavioral... no tricks   Answer Question
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