Red Hat Solution Architect Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Find jobs for Solution Architect

Red Hat Solution Architect Interview Questions

Updated Jan 19, 2018
15 Interview Reviews

Experience

Experience
64%
7%
29%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview
42%
33%
17%
8

Difficulty

3.2
Average

Difficulty

Hard
Average
Easy

15 Candidate Interview ReviewsBack to all Interviews

Filter

Helpful (2)  

Solution Architect Interview

Anonymous Employee
Accepted Offer

Application

I applied in-person. The process took 5+ weeks. I interviewed at Red Hat.

Interview

Knew the people because of prior business with other IT vendors
Got passed my CV to their boss and they contacted me.
After 5 interviews I was in.

Interview Questions

  • What did you do/How did you accomplish a growth of 300% on single deals?   Answer Question

Negotiation

Not much room for netotiation, they will get the best they can offer right away.

Other Interview Reviews for Red Hat

  1. Helpful (1)  

    Solutions Architect Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in New York, NY
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. I interviewed at Red Hat (New York, NY) in March 2015.

    Interview

    Phone Screen followed by Interview at New York City Office. Interviewer was new and had poor intimidating attitude and no skill - he got every technical point wrong. He asked simple questions on J EE, got it wrong like it's been called J EE for years and he thought J2EE and then said I should go along with being treated abusively and listening to wrong answers - I am good in dealing with people - they were backwards and clueless. They blundered again because they couldn't understand Java class loaders - and this was a Sr Solution Architect role. Such a lack of talent and he and another non-techinical manager kept saying 'I've never heard that before' - what losers. Management - If you want to get and keep good people lose the no talent poor attitude front line people because you have no chance of getting anyone who has programming skill let alone good professionals with people like that. I bnet you'd double to triple the quality of your talent base by removing non-technical middle managers standing in their way. Technical people ask technical questions not non-technical entry level managers who don't know they don't know.

    Interview Questions


  2. Helpful (4)  

    Solution Architect Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 2+ weeks. I interviewed at Red Hat in April 2013.

    Interview

    Had phone interview with marketing guy. Went well. Then never heard back from recruiter as to whether or not the process would move forward. So I called the recruiter back a week later and she told me that they had already made an offer to another candidate! What a waste of my time. The duplicity of HR and recruiters at Red Hat leave a bad taste in my mouth and now I never want to work for them or do business with them. Dishonest company.

    Interview Questions

    • not difficult did not matter they had no real intention of offering me the job   1 Answer
  3.  

    Solutions Architect Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil)
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Red Hat (São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil)) in June 2016.

    Interview

    First step was a group activity. Initially each person introduced themselves (education, experience, goals, etc). Next we were given out a short story full of ambiguities to answers questions about, individually, in groups of three, then form a single consensus to compare to an official set of responses. Afterwards, individually, we were asked to write essays about the open-source software market.

    Second interview was individual, with a senior solutions architect, the team manager and an HR rep. We had to prepare a presentation about a business case and answer varied questions.

    Interview Questions

    • Did you attend any open-source/free-software conferences?   Answer Question

  4. Helpful (2)  

    Solutions Architect Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Interview

    Initial comms through consultant.
    1 st interview with manager
    Multiple other interviews with future colleagues, consultants.
    Questions ranged from - previous experience, to technical expertise to designing solutions on the fly.
    All things considered, it was quite thorough, and everyone behaved decently, with no one displaying airs.
    There was a lot of solution designing on the fly.

    Interview Questions

    • If you were offered this job, under what conditions would you reject it?   Answer Question

  5. Helpful (7)  

    Solutions Architect Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Interview

    These were probably the most insulting interviews I have ever had. Initially I did not even process what had just happened, it was only a few days later when I really understood how condescending those phone calls where.

    The initial call, with the actual recruiter, went just fine. He seemed like a nice person, understanding of the needs of his company and to the point about the process. Nothing much to comment, negatively, about him.

    I agreed to have a call with the person in charge. The call started off in what seemed like a nice environment which quickly turned sour. The person on the other end of the line told me, literally: "I had to laugh at your CV, listing you won a programming contest four years in a row when there were probably no other contestants".
    To put things in context; I grew up in south America, where I also got my university degree. We used to hold a programming contest among the local universities, which had a significant number of students in the IT branch. Having that said; I won that context four years in a row. Four out of my five years at university, the fifth time I did not take part in the contest.

    The tone in which this person said he had to laugh at my CV took me by surprise, I tried to ignore the fact that I had just been plainly insulted, almost like I had to put that in my CV just to make it sound more interesting. I continued with the conversation trying to focus on what RedHat could potentially offer me.

    The interview ended well -of course, the person on the other line must have felt his ego take a boost- which led to another phone call from the recruiter organizing a second interview with another person.

    I got the call as scheduled and it all seemed to go well; the usual questions about "what and why", and then... Again, let's put things into context; I have been involved, mainly, with start-ups for as long as I can remember, it made me happy and I am proud I went that route. Not only has it been a very enriching path but it has also given me the opportunity to fully unleash my creative power and build some of the most amazing things.

    Then, at some point, my interlocutor said he was extremely worried because of my start-up experience. "It does not seem you have much corporate experience and RedHat is NOT (stressing out the not) a start-up", he continued; "You cannot join a company like RedHat, with over 9000 employees, with a start-up mind set, we used to be a start-up, yes, 15 years ago. We are NOT (again, the stress on not) a start-up". - Interesting, wouldn't you agree?

    I guess the part that was actually funny was that they were calling me for a role I did not even apply for.

    I remember the days when tech companies thought it was cool to try to completely destroy the candidate at an interview. Companies like Google used to have this ridiculous recruitment process where, in the middle of a significant conversation, they would ask you how many tennis balls you can fit in a plane... To determine you reactive thinking, so they said. Absurd!

    If I, or anyone else, applies for a job at your company, that does not mean you have the right to patronize, be condescending, insult, diminish or any way offend the person you are interviewing. You must, first of all, acknowledge that to this person you (or your company, for that matter) are someone to look up to, else they would not waste their time sending you their application. Be humble, you have been chosen by someone and this someone is going to dedicate a part of their life to your company.

    I felt very disrespected by RedHat and I would encourage anyone to stop this behaviour as soon as it appears. Not matter which company it is, do not let them pretend they are better, stronger, faster and smarter than you, if they were they would not be calling you, they need you.

    About me; I am a software engineer, I hold a MSc. in Computer Science and a MSc. in Biomedical Engineering. I started a PhD. in Neuroscience and I have worked on every continent. I also speak 5 languages.

    Interview Questions

    • Why do I list in my CV that I have won a programming contest four years in a row and why do I have so much start-up experience?   1 Answer

  6. Helpful (1)  

    Solution Architect Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in London, England (UK)
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 3+ months. I interviewed at Red Hat (London, England (UK)) in August 2016.

    Interview

    Process started off well with plenty of communication from the recruiter, they lined up the phone interview quickly. From there is was pretty much a complete joke. Weeks would go by with zero communication, no information on what was happening, many times I assumed it was dead. From the phone interview to scheduling the face to face interview it took 2 months!

    The face to face interview was frosty and unpleasant, no attempt was made to demonstrate what it would be like working at Red Hat, the team, the culture, even the simple details of the job were all forgotten. It seemed like an exercise to grill the candidate as much as possible with a barrage of questions and show off how clever they are at interviews (posing off the wall questions and laughing at your response)

    After the interview I've heard nothing. Three weeks have passed and they've ignored every email, and failed to give any feedback or information on how it went. Absolutely terrible, I would not ever work at Red Hat based on this experiance

    Interview Questions

    • Wanted a presentation on Hybrid Cloud, which was to be an essay style opinion piece   1 Answer

  7. Helpful (2)  

    Solutions Architect Interview

    Anonymous Employee in San Diego, CA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. I interviewed at Red Hat (San Diego, CA) in August 2017.

    Interview

    A Red Hat recruiter (OK, "Talent Acquisition Specialist" :-) ) contacted me about this position. He explained that the interview process would probably take about three weeks due to the schedules of various involved individuals. I spoke with the manager who will be my direct supervisor first a couple of days after initial contact. He was very personable, and it was clear that they're looking for personality and cultural fit as well as technical expertise. A few days after that, I had a second phone interview with a senior architect where the questions became more technical, but it was still clear that wasn't all they wanted. Both of these interviewers were clearly very happy with their jobs and careers, and that was really exciting. In most cases, there would have been a phone call with the account exec that the position is to support (turns out I already knew him, so we skipped that part!) followed by an in-person panel type of interview, which we also skipped... apparently they were already satisfied that I was their guy :-) All in all, it was a very positive experience for me, and made me even more excited to join the team!

    I had talked with Red Hat previously about a different role, which included more travel than I was comfortable with. Those who want to work with Red Hat should be aware that a lot of travel is likely to be part of the deal for some positions. Also, that last time, I had taken their HackerRank test, which is very similar to an RHCSA / RCHE exam. You will NOT be able to fake your way through that. Having a Red Hat certification in hand is very helpful, as they know what that means. And if you aren't really excited about Red Hat and have a certain basic amount of knowledge of their products, you likely won't make it far in the process. Everyone I've dealt with loves working here, and it's clear they're well taken care of. But that means they can afford to be picky.

    Interview Questions

    • Many questions involved my experience with or knowledge of an array of Red Hat products or specific Linux technologies, like SELinux and firewalld.   Answer Question
  8.  

    Solution Architect Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Vienna (Austria)
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. The process took 2+ months. I interviewed at Red Hat (Vienna (Austria)) in March 2017.

    Interview

    Es gab in prinzip 5 Interviews in 3 Runden.
    Zuerst ein allgemeines HR Call, dann technische Telefoninterview, dann onsite Interview mit dem zukünftigen manager, der Country Lead und ein Techniker.

    Interview Questions

    • Nennen sie 5 Wörter wodurch sie sich bezeichnen.
      Was bringen sie für Red Hat mit?   1 Answer

  9. Helpful (5)  

    Solutions Architect Interview

    Anonymous Employee in New Delhi (India)
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 3+ months. I interviewed at Red Hat (New Delhi (India)).

    Interview

    The Red Hat interview process is a slow at first as they take their time to process the resume and shortlist. But once the resume is shortlisted, activity was quite swift with 1-2 updates each week. I had to go through 6-7 rounds of interview (they were more like discussions) and in the process I talked to 6 people from different work groups that my role would need interaction with. All these people gave their inputs to HR who consolidated the data and created a well-rounded profile. It was a mix of telephonic and in-person meetings, not necessarily in Red Hat office premises and the company was helpful in accommodating my prior commitments.

    Interview Questions

    • They asked about ideas for my new job profile and my approach towards this role   Answer Question

    Negotiation

    Negotiation phase was very quick, as pretty much every thing was standard except the actual CTC and role. It lasted 1 week during which both Red Hat and I came to a common position. Their main negotiation plank was my early joining.


Don't Miss Out On a Job You Love
Upload a resume to easily apply to jobs from anywhere. It's simple to set up.