Rolls-Royce Interview Questions in United Kingdom | Glassdoor

Rolls-Royce Interview Questions in United Kingdom

Updated Aug 13, 2017
209 Interview Reviews

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  1. Helpful (1)  

    IT Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Rolls-Royce in June 2017.

    Interview

    Initial telephone call with HR following online application, only took ten minutes or so. Mainly admin questions about current employment responsibilities, location and notice period. Expect to hear back in two weeks if proceeding to interview.

    Interview Questions


  2.  

    Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Derby, England (UK)
    Declined Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Rolls-Royce (Derby, England (UK)) in June 2017.

    Interview

    Online application with cover letter and CV as well as some information pertaining to permission to work etc. Thereafter there was a telephone call asking the following:
    - What do you know about the company?
    - What is your salary expectation?
    - Name your key three skills relevant to the role.

    Thereafter I was invited to Derby for the interview. The panel was purely technical and the interview was highly technical, too. First, they bring out a schematic of a gas turbine and ask technical questions about the machine. These range from specific complex questions about their IP to basic fundamental questions relevant to your area of expertise. Secondly, they ask STAR type competency questions.

    Interview Questions

    • Have you ever failed some task or let someone down? How did you regain their trust?   Answer Question
    • Explain the operation of a gas turbine.   Answer Question
    • Describe a time you had to go back to a problem because the first solution didn't work.   Answer Question
  3.  

    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Rolls-Royce in June 2017.

    Interview

    Invited to an assessment day in June 2017. RR sorted a hotel for the night before and reimbursed train fares, so despite the long day, had a pleasant experience.

    Started with a 10 min presentation on myself, then into the usual competency questions which lasted another 30-45 minutes.

    2nd activity was a repeat of the mathematical online test, but on paper - presumably to check you didn't cheat online!

    After a break was a group activity, paper plane building exercise, which lasted half an hour and was quite enjoyable.

    Then followed lunch and an hour or so long technical interview which was pretty tough! Few props - in my case a turbine stator blade - which required explanations on everything from the materials, manufacturing method through to its use. Tonnes of stuff, just know your materials and general aerodynamic theory and you should be okay. I had a fantastic interviewer who was kind enough to offer some level of hints when I got a little lost!

    Both interviews were 1 to 1 and I could have zero complaints about the assessors present on the day, very easy to talk to during breaks and very honest during interviews and in providing feedback.

    Interview Questions

    • Explain the distribution on a load level vs components graph. Showing two bell curve distributions, one in service and one measured on the test bed.   Answer Question

  4.  

    Engineering Graduate Trainee Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Derby, England (UK)
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Rolls-Royce (Derby, England (UK)) in June 2017.

    Interview

    Whole day assessment centre: Numerical test, 10 minute presentation with very few competency questions, group exercise and technical interview.

    Numerical test is exactly the same style as online testing.
    Hard to go wrong with the 10 minute presentation, focus on your experiences and what you've learnt that makes you a valuable engineer.
    Technical interview - the hardest part. You can only prepare so much because the interviewer finds out the limit of your knowledge quickly and asks things you don't know to see how you react. Being familiar with engineering basics (e.g. materials processing) definitely helps.

    Interview Questions

    • What is something difficult you've done in the past year?   1 Answer

  5.  

    Aeromechanical Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Derby, England (UK)
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Rolls-Royce (Derby, England (UK)) in June 2017.

    Interview

    Applied online. Received a quick phone call (10 mins) after approx 1 month for general questions. Invited to face to face interview 20 days later, with many technical and HR questions.

    Interview Questions

    • How a turbojet engine works, detailed questions on compressor aerodynamics (blades design)   Answer Question

  6. Helpful (1)  

    Intern Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Derby, England (UK)
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Rolls-Royce (Derby, England (UK)) in May 2017.

    Interview

    I took the online test on May 12th. Was told I passed that same day; CV review followed. Invitation to assessment centre received on the 15th. Assessment centre held 22nd.

    The whole process began from about 9am and ended at around 3pm. There's some early on networking with your assessors, and then you're briefed on the day's schedule. The first part for me was the presentation and competency-based questions. Presentation should take about 10 minutes and then you're asked questions based on your presentation and CV, for the assessor to get a better understanding of you and your experiences. Next were questions about the company: Recent bad press, who are their customers, how do they currently sell their engines, challenges facing the company currently (economic, etc). This section ended with competency based questions along the lines of "Give an instance of when you had to influence someone or a group of people" and "a time you worked in a team and had to take a different approach to reaching goals". There are follow up questions and some advice on these scenarios based on your answers. At least there were in my case. This section is likely the easiest to cruise through.

    Numerical test similar to online test, but now on paper. Not really challenging.

    The group exercise was next and it was shocking, to be honest. You're tasked with choosing and constructing paper planes in your groups (of 5 or 6) and making a presentation at the end. Assessors are watching the whole period and take notes on each person. You're asked questions after the group presentation. It was shocking because there were overly aggressive members of the group who wouldn't give other people a chance to speak and would literally hijack suggestions people were making to make themselves appear to be the originators, or hijack tasks people had started on. Don't know how well that played out with the assessors, but it certainly ticked off group members. Try to keep to time throughout. You have about a half hour.

    Finally, technical interview. Hands down the toughest part of the day. It starts off with generic "Why engineering?" or "Why Rolls-Royce?" or "What engineering experience do you have outside your coursework?" questions. Progresses to technical questions about failure modes, materials, functions, etc. You say what aspect of engineering you're studying and they ask you questions under that. I'm in Mechanical Engineering. The questions get progressively harder. I was unprepared for questions on pumps and floundered there, but most questions tie into aero engines so you want to be prepared for that. Talk extensively when answering and ask for clarification if you're unsure. My assessor here was alright for most of it, but he seemed exasperated at certain points. I'd been told that they want to see how you think and try to get to an answer, and sometimes guide you through. Nope. Didn't get that sense in my case. Just get the answer right.

    At some point you get to ask people on the Graduate scheme some questions about the company. It's a chilled out session really, but you don't get any points for brown-nosing there so save your energy if you're the type.

    Interview Questions

    • Explain Bernoulli's principle.   Answer Question
    • Who are our customers?   1 Answer
    • How do we sell to customers?   1 Answer
    • Why is fatigue in the Aerospace industry extremely dangerous?   1 Answer

  7.  

    Engineering(Summer) Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Derby, England (UK)
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 5+ months. I interviewed at Rolls-Royce (Derby, England (UK)) in May 2017.

    Interview

    I was placed on the reserve list.

    Applied online towards the end of December just before the position closed and had to take an online test. Upon completion, I was told I'd been invited to the assessment centre and that they would call, but I did not hear from them again until just a week before the interview, so don't worry if they don't get back to you because you will still get the interview. Other candidates said they'd had to do a phone interview but this was not the case for me.

    On the day you take part in:

    A numerical reasoning test (similar to the online test to verify that you didn't get someone else to do it for you). It's negative marking for wrong answers so it pays to make sure you're getting the ones you answer right.

    A presentation about yourself followed by a competency interview. Both of these were with just one assessor and the whole thing is very relaxed. You're allowed to sit for the presentation, so it comes off more as a regular interview session than a gruelling presentation. The competency interview regards your ability to work as part of a team and your understanding of what the company does. The assessors are very friendly so there's no need to get worked up about this.

    A group exercise with a few other candidates. Speaking to the assessors afterwards, it seems that they set a task which is purposely next to impossible to complete (well) within the time limit. They're looking to see how you work in a team - making sure everyone is included and working together, demonstrating leadership without taking charge and ignoring the team (as a few of the people in my group tried to do!). Make sure to read the rules thoroughly so you don't get caught out, and participate in the post-exercise discussion even if the other members of your team seem to have mostly answered the questions they ask.

    A technical interview. This is really what you'd expect it to be. A solid understanding of turbofan operation is a must and a good understanding of materials and manufacturing processes will also be useful. Make sure you're aware of what sets the company apart from its competitors. The format was generally they'd show you a drawing or a component and ask questions about it (how it works, what it's made from, how you would make it). They'll throw in some questions that you couldn't really be expected to know the answer to (I was shown a schematic of a prototype oil pump), but don't worry about these. The graduate employees we spoke to stressed that the purpose of these questions (and all of the others too, really) is to see how you react when faced with something new. Be sure to explain your thought process to the assessor even if you can't answer the question. They'll give you hints if you can't answer the question. Sitting there for two minutes without saying anything or just saying "I don't know," without even talking through the problem with them is the only thing you could really do wrong.

    Upon completion, they got back to me within 48 hours and provided detailed feedback on my performance on the day so I can't fault them on their communication.

    Interview Questions

    • What are some environmental factors influencing the design of engines?   1 Answer
    • What recent events in the news might affect Rolls Royce?   1 Answer
  8.  

    Assistant Systems Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Birmingham, England (UK)
    No Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Rolls-Royce (Birmingham, England (UK)) in May 2017.

    Interview

    There was three parts to the assessment day. A tour around the building with recent graduates. Then a group assessment based on a real scenario. Had to do a presentation about our findings. Finally there was an hour long interview asking about experiences related to the role. Also had to Design an EEC, doesn't have to be correct but you have to explain the logic behind it.

    Interview Questions


  9.  

    Graduate Engineer - Nuclear Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Newcastle upon Tyne, England (UK)
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 3+ months. I interviewed at Rolls-Royce (Newcastle upon Tyne, England (UK)) in May 2017.

    Interview

    It took HR about 6 months from sending off my application to get back to me. From the first correspondence I was asked to attend an assessment centre in Derby the next week.

    The assessment centre I was placed in was for a Electrical Control Systems which wasn't my background as the role I applied for had been filled, but I was told that if I attended and passed the assessment centre I would be offered a role in something more suitable to my background. I was told not to worry which made me feel a lot more at ease before going.

    AC consisted of:
    1)Initial welcome,
    2)Present a prepared presentation about Rolls Royce competencies and what I would add to the role. (Information on this was all given of what to expect and prepare) Competency based questions are asked after the presentation.
    3) Group exercise on making paper aeroplanes to a specification. The task is actually about how you work together and act around others rather than how well you do the task itself.
    4) Numerical tests, which are EXACTLY the same as what you do online for the application. However this time they are on paper. This is just to prove that you yourself did them and didn't cheat.
    5) Technical interview.

    Top tip: you aren't there in competition with the other candidates, if you do well and pass the assessment centre they will not reject you. They will either give you a role or put you on a reserve list. So work together!

    They got back to me the next week, I wasn't given an offer as the position I applied for. But was placed on a reserve list for a role that better reflected my background.

    Interview Questions

    • Can you explain in layman terms what metal fatigue is?   1 Answer

  10. Helpful (3)  

    Graduate Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Derby, England (UK)
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 5+ months. I interviewed at Rolls-Royce (Derby, England (UK)) in April 2017.

    Interview

    I applied in mid-November and got the invitation for the online psychometric tests, which I happened to pass (not very tough, but do not guess, if you are unsure, just leave it because it affects your overall percentile). Moving on from there, my application was screened from HR and got selected for the assessment centre (1st week of January 2017), so I was waiting and after 3 months I got the assessment centre invitation. Don't worry if you haven't heard for long, cause they will call.

    On the assessment centre day, it was 12 of us. Everyone was nice and friendly, especially the assessors make you feel very comfortable and the hosting ladies are extremely nice too. Make sure you approach each and everyone you meet and have a few words with them, ask about their daily routine, how they got in, etc.

    Talk to the other candidates and get to know them, because you are not competing against them if everyone on the day meets the standard, everyone will get an offer. Six of us had to do the personal presentation first followed by the numerical reasoning test. The personal presentation is the most difficult out of the four. You really need to explain why you want to join RR and draw on real life situations when explaining your competencies. Also, smile all the time, they like it and makes you less nervous when they smile back.

    On the group activity, we had to build paper aeroplanes, have an eye on the time and follow the instructions very carefully. There was one member in our team who was trying to control everyone, not sure how the assessors took it. Make sure you speak and contribute in some way. At the end you need to present what you did, at the end of this, they will ask you questions like "how would you have done something differently?:, make sure you answer this question even if someone else answers, just add something, they note it down.

    The technical interview - people say it's difficult but not really if you're a very technical minded person. Basically, if you are asked a question, which sounds very unfamiliar, apply your principals and make sure you say something without staying blank/lost, they like it and tend to support you when you do this.

    Networking is very important, do speak a lot. It's important you leave a good impression, cause at the end of the day they all sit down to talk about the candidates. All the best!!!

    Interview Questions


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