Salesforce Software Development Summer Intern Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Salesforce Software Development Summer Intern Interview Questions

Interviews at Salesforce

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Software Development Summer Intern Interview

Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
Accepted Offer
Positive Experience
Average Interview

Application

I applied through an employee referral. The process took 1+ week. I interviewed at Salesforce (San Francisco, CA) in March 2011.

Interview

I had two phone interviews with salesforce.com for this position.

The first interview was about data structures and algorithms. I was asked if I knew what MVC is, and how I would design a parking garage using OO modeling. Standard questions about how I would find 2 numbers that add up to zero (or any other number) in constant time, then using constant memory etc, and then a question about how I would find a Tribonacci number (sum of 3 previous numbers), why recursion on this would be bad, and how I would do this in constant space, writing and reading out the code for QuickSort.

The second interviewer asked me stuff about Natural Language Processing, as I had mentioned I had done a course on this in my resume. After this he asked me given 999 numbers out of a thousand, how I would find that one number which was missing, and then what the solution would be if there were two numbers missing. I thought I had messed up my second interview, as I required hints to do this question, but I suppose as my first interview went really well I was given the offer.

In contrast to what I've read elsewhere, both my interviewers were friendly and nice. Besides, as I had another offer whose deadline was approaching, the recruiting team ensured my interviews happened soon enough.

Interview Questions

  • Quick Sort code   Answer Question
  • Find a pair of numbers that sums up to zero (or any other number), then find three (and then four) numbers that sum up to zero.   1 Answer
  • Given 999 distinct numbers between 1 and 1000, find one/two that is/are missing.   4 Answers
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