Spiceworks Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Spiceworks Interview Questions

Interviews at Spiceworks

100 Interview Reviews

Experience

Experience
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Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview
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  1.  

    Software Developer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Austin, TX
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through college or university. I interviewed at Spiceworks (Austin, TX).

    Interview

    There were two 30-minute technical interviews that were back-to-back. Each interview consists of at least 2 coding problems and some questions over the time and space complexities of your code.

    Interview Questions


  2. Helpful (1)  

    Software Developer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Austin, TX
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through college or university. The process took 1 day. I interviewed at Spiceworks (Austin, TX) in October 2015.

    Interview

    Met the company at a career fair - got a call a day before the interview asking for me to come in. Very laid back and friendly experience - my most positive interview to date!

    The whole process was convenient since I'm local, and the people I met once there were extremely welcoming! Their unique and very attractive work culture was extremely apparent.

    Interview Questions

    • Basic array manipulation problems and generation of Fibonacci sequence.   Answer Question
  3. Helpful (2)  

    Software Developer Interview

    Anonymous Employee
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through college or university. The process took 3+ months. I interviewed at Spiceworks.

    Interview

    Initially gave my resume to a recruiter at my school’s career fair and was told about the company, their culture, and the technology they use. Got a call back 3.5 weeks later asking if I was available for an on-campus interview with the CTO in just a couple of days. He was nice and asked about a thing or two on my resume then gave me a coding challenge on paper. After I came up with a solution, he discussed my answer and other possible ones then gave me time for a question or two. This is something I noticed and liked about all of their technical interviews – each interviewer gave feedback about my answers, either along the way or when I was done, and made it feel more collaborative.

    It took them a little over a month to get back to me about moving forward. A week after that, I had a phone interview with a lead developer. He was friendly, laid-back, and I enjoyed the interview a good deal. Instead of focusing on my resume, he asked me a number of technical questions to gauge my experience. Many of them I didn’t know, but he told me that was ok and to guess what I thought the answer was anyways. After each one, we discussed the answer and he elaborated on why he chose to ask that question. Then we did a collaborative coding question on a live text editor site (similar to Google Docs). Along the way, he pointed out what I might want to think about and discussed my solution to the problem in an open and friendly manner.

    I then got an email back after a few days to schedule an on-site at their HQ in Austin. The location of their office was a bit of a drive from downtown Austin and not much around which was probably the only negative of my time there. Anyways, the on-site consisted of four technical interviews, lunch (not really an interview), and the potential of meeting with the CEO and another higher-up. I say potential because that is what I kept being told, but it definitely seemed like the last two interviews were only for people who passed the other ones that day. The technical interviews were similar to the previous ones except with a whiteboard this time. And after those, I met with the VP of Products and the CEO. Everyone I met there was amicable, down to earth, and willing to talk openly about the company. The whole experience at their office was relaxed and it all seemed to click. I received an offer a couple of days later which I negotiated up a bit and decided to accept based on my experience with the people.

    Overall, I got the impression that culture is something everyone values deeply and they work hard to maintain a good and positive atmosphere. Everybody was exceptionally friendly and it was easy to tell they were on top of their game. The CEO discussed with me why he co-founded the company and had an honest conversation about the growth the company is currently experiencing and what that means going forward. I came away from it all very impressed to say the least.

    Interview Questions

    • String manipulation mostly - more specific questions can be found in other reviews   Answer Question

    Negotiation

    I negotiated for more which they met me halfway on.


  4. Helpful (2)  

    Software Developer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Austin, TX
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 3 weeks. I interviewed at Spiceworks (Austin, TX) in February 2015.

    Interview

    One phone screen for personality evaluation, followed by an online coding challenge that took 1-2 hours to complete, to be written in any language.

    In person interviews were scheduled after that the first was coming in just for two interviews, about 45 minutes each from two different software engineers, one having the title of Senior Engineer.

    After these two, I was called back for another round of interviews with 5 people (also 45 minutes each), with lunch in the middle of the day. This day consisted also of Developer interviews as well as two interviews from Founders. For the lunch, I joined two other developers as they went to lunch off-site and they answered any and all questions about the company, with elaboration on their own experiences thus far.

    The general interview format was a) meet person, b) person had copy of my resume and asked questions to ask about previous work, b) brief chatting about my thoughts on the company, what my aspirations are, either by joining or in general, c) technical interview question chosen by the interviewer that I would solve on the whiteboard. Usually they would answer any questions about the problem as I solved it, and felt very encouraging. However, when interviewed by the founders, they left the room as I solved the question so I wouldn't feel pressured by them watching me.

    I thought each interviewer's question was very easy to understand, and the few questions I did ask were clarified easily. They didn't seem to be looking for any particular answer, but rather how I went about solving the problem, and sometimes casually asking if I could improve my code, or offering a reason to go about it a different way if it looked like my code was ignoring certain possible inputs. I felt relatively relaxed throughout the whole thing, despite my desire to do my best, and I'll admit -- after one founder offered an alternative way to go about his problem, I spent the next week thinking that I had screwed it up completely (this was not the case, but anxiety sometimes gets the better of you).

    10/10 would interview again.

    Interview Questions

    • Find the longest palindrome in a given string. (Do your best to optimize).   1 Answer

  5. Helpful (2)  

    Software Developer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Austin, TX
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 4 weeks. I interviewed at Spiceworks (Austin, TX) in February 2014.

    Interview

    The interview process is kind of long. I had to do a little homework problem, then a phone interview, then a set of interviews with team members, and finally a set of interviews with the founders. This took about a month to execute in total.

    The homework problem was pretty easy for a developer worth their salt, even one fresh out of school. They asked me to do it in whatever language I was comfortable with, which was awesome, because I'm a Python developer and SW is a Ruby shop.

    The phone interview was not bad. It doesn't stand out in my head as anything other than a phone interview.

    The 1-on-1 interviews were fun; I saw maybe 5 people... everyone had me do a problem on the board. There's generally a fixed set of problems that you're asked to do in a technical interview... I was actually impressed that I got asked a real-life problem and a problem I'd never heard before. Everyone was very cool, easy to talk to, and were okay with the fact that I was a Ruby novice.

    The founder interviews were interesting. You'd think that you'd be done with the technical part once you got past the last round of interviews, right? Not on your life. The CTO gave me an operating system problem, then left the room while I did it to avoid pressure. I was very impressed that they took the time to talk to me and stress the importance of culture here. That's probably what cinched it for me that I wanted to work here.

    Interview Questions

    • How would you determine the probability of a particular team selecting a particular player in the NBA's weighted lottery system?   Answer Question

    Negotiation

    I got more than I asked for.

    Don't be afraid to ask for what you think you're worth.


  6. Helpful (3)  

    Software Developer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Austin, TX
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 5 weeks. I interviewed at Spiceworks (Austin, TX) in November 2013.

    Interview

    Initial contact and phone screen was with a member of HR and it was pleasant enough. Then I was given a practical exam to do at home then return for evaluation. It was complex, confusing, time- and labor-intensive, and I actually stopped about two thirds of the way through - it was reaching the level of investment I usually give to paid work. Told the recruiter I wasn't interested in continuing and thought that was that.

    They contacted me a couple of weeks later and admitted that the test was giving lots of people problems so they decided to do away with it in favor of a technical phone screen and was I still interested? I agreed and scheduled a 45-minute conversation with a developer.

    The screen itself was quite disorganized, lots of high-level computer science questions mixed in with very basic questions about my specialty (which the screener knew little about). The interviewer was very nice and polite but it quickly became apparent that I was being interviewed for a position that was not the same as the one for which I had applied. When I asked about that the answer was that they had no specialists, everyone just worked on whatever needed to be done. In fact, the interviewer was not from the department with the open position and knew nothing about it.

    So I wrote off working at Spiceworks as soon as I hung up the phone. To their credit they contacted me about a week later with a decline email in which they said they felt "my skills were not right for them at this juncture." I imagine that's probably true for whatever random job they had in mind.

    Interview Questions

    • I can't remember specific questions now but I do remember asking several times "what does this have to do with the position?"   1 Answer

  7. Helpful (4)  

    Software Developer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 3 weeks. I interviewed at Spiceworks in March 2014.

    Interview

    I was first contacted by email saying they were interested and wondered if I wanted to set up an interview. Of course I said yes so they set it up a couple days later. The guy called me but apparently they had issues with their phones because I couldn't hear anything. I tried to call back but nothing happned. I later got an email saying they were having issues and would set it up for the next day. I said that was fine. The initial screening interview went pretty well as expected, had a few things in common and was very pleasant. After the initial interview I was given a programming test which I completed that night. Once I turned that in, it pretty much went all down hill.

    I was told that the review of my program was well received and if I had availability the latter half of the week. I said sure, of course, but didn't hear anything for a week. Next week rolled around and I emailed the guy and asked him if anything had been scheduled yet. He said sorry, and set it up right away. So the time came around for the phone interview and I never got called. Emailed the guy again, he said sorry again, and said he would set something up again for the latter part of the week. Finally I got to talk to someone, and I thought it went well. He had an ego, you could tell, and was using some sort of conference phone so it was hard to hear what he was saying. Having to ask him over and over again what he said I'm sure did not look good. He also seemed like he wasn't putting too much effort into it. Anyways, I got emailed the next day saying I had a great background but the typical "wasn't the right fit" response was given. However, they said "don't fret!", and if another position came up that fit my skill set, they'd contact me. I doubt that's true but it's nice to hear.

    Hope for the best for Spiceworks although it wasn't such a pleasant interviewing process.

    Interview Questions

    • Give me an example of something cool you're working on right now   Answer Question
  8. Helpful (2)  

    Software Development Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Average Interview

    Interview

    Applied online on university website
    Interview at university with a spiceworks employee
    asked about company
    asked why you should get the job
    Wasn't too hard, but it was my first technical interview
    One technical question that wasn't too hard about angle between hour and minute hand

    Interview Questions

    • Write a code the returns the angle between the hour and minute hand   1 Answer

  9.  

    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied through a recruiter. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Spiceworks in March 2013.

    Interview

    After emailing a recruiter my resume very late in the spring recruiting season, I had one 45 minute onsite interview with one engineer. Was asked two simple technical questions. It went surprisingly very well, and I got the offer a week later. This was in 2013 when they had a smaller intern program. I think the recruiting is a good bit tougher & more formal nowadays.

    Interview Questions

    • Some questions about a past experience, two simple programming problems on the whiteboard.   Answer Question

  10.  

    Software QA Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Easy Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Spiceworks.

    Interview

    Personality phone interview and technical test. The phone interview was pretty easy. Just asking what I like to work on. The technical portion covered a troubleshooting test that was related to the spiceworks web application.

    Interview Questions

    • Given a prompt, describe how you would troubleshoot this issue in a web application.   Answer Question

See What Spiceworks Employees Are Saying

Titanic

13 people found this helpful

StarStarStarStarStar   Former Account Executive in Austin, TX

Pros: “The company is built on a great cultural foundation and hires intelligent people. Regular Austin "startup-y" perks (snacks, gym, swag). Genuine base of end users (IT Pros) who...”“The company is built on a great cultural foundation and hires intelligent people. Regular Austin "startup-y" perks (snacks, gym, swag). Genuine base of end users (IT Pros) who adore the brand. Solid training, both initial and ongoing” – Full Review

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