Stockamp & Associates Business Analyst Interview Questions | Glassdoor

Stockamp & Associates Business Analyst Interview Questions

Interviews at Stockamp & Associates

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Business Analyst Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate
No Offer
Negative Experience
Average Interview

Application

I applied through an employee referral. The process took 2 weeks. I interviewed at Stockamp & Associates in September 2010.

Interview

The interview consisted of one 30 minute phone interview to dtermine if there is a initally a fit. The interviewer was relatively unprofessional in that he harangued me about why I thought it had taken so long for me to get a job. After explaining to him the numerous reasons and the current state of the economy, which he apparently was unaware of, he commenced to talking about the position. When he had finished his spiel, he asked what I thought abou the position. His explanation was thoroughly confusing and this was evidenced by the fact that the remaining interviewers did not have a clear understanding either, which I will get to. It really begs the question of whether the company knows where it is headed. The business analyst position basically works between two departments, Implementation and Support, with no clear boundary on how much you support either side. At some point in your career, a business analyst would move in one of these directions, to either work on the implementation team or the support team. When he asked what I thought I relayed that either was fine, but if I had a choice for my future, I would choose to head in the implementation direction since it was what I am used to. He was not happy by this response and proceeded to say that if I wanted to get the interview he recommended not giving the direction I wanted to head since it wasnt up to me. The company is very conservative and you must be very passionate about being a business analyst and not so much about healthcare or any of the industries Stockamp supports. You also should not display a forward thinking attitude or have aspirations. Do not think of where you want to be down the road, because that's not what they want to hear. The company has many employees who have been there for many years, and this creates its own set of problems, but basically, in my opnion, they want sheep for employees. "A team of rivals," they do not want.

After finally getting through the phone interview, a few days later I got a call to come in for the three hour face-to-face interview. This consisted of three separate interviews, each an hour long and each with different people. The first was with an interviewer who came in with another worker that didnt say two words. That person's only job was to transcribe the entire interview. He typed the entire time. This particular interview was behavioral questions. They were mostly situational. For example, describe a time when you faced a particularly tough problem, what was the problem, and how did you solve it. There are about 10 of these questions, maybe less, but they are standard and relatively easy to answer for anyone that has been in the workforce for any amount of time.

The second interview is with a person on the technical side and he asks some questions of you regarding a technical nature. these are not overly difficult questions, but not ones that the average computer user would know. For example, how would you describe what an I.P. address is in laymans terms? Also, what is a SAN? In addition, there was a SQL problem in which they asked you to write a staement for the problem. My question was to join two tables.

The third interview was more of a interview to examine your thought processes. The interviewer tells you a situation in which a hospital administrator wants to improve wait times in his emergency room. The interviewer asks to hear what questions and solutions you have for the adminstrator to see how you would solve his probelm efficiently and effectively and your thought processes as to how you would go about this. An example of a question I gave was to ask the administrator why, first and foremost, this is a concern, and then ask many questions related to his information as it pertains to competitors, perception, etc, etc., or whgat data he is using. Ask the hospital staff what they think about wait times etc., etc. For people who have done business process analysis or project management before, this will be easy. At the end, there is a simple math problem about percentages to do requiring a calculation. It is only one problem that takes about 5 minutes.

Interview Questions

  • Nothing unexpected, but the toughest part would be to brush up on simple technicals skills like basic SQL for the second, technical interview.   Answer Question
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