U.S. Government Accountability Office Data Analyst Interview Questions | Glassdoor

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U.S. Government Accountability Office Data Analyst Interview Questions

Interviews at U.S. Government Accountability Office

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Data Analyst Interview

Anonymous Interview Candidate in Washington, DC
No Offer
Negative Experience
Average Interview

Application

I applied online. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at U.S. Government Accountability Office (Washington, DC).

Interview

I applied for a full-time employee position through the USAJobs [dot] gov website. A few weeks after the position closed, I received a phone call to schedule a phone interview. A week or so later, I was contacted to schedule a face-to-face interview. About two weeks later, I was told that I was not selected... and I was relieved at that news.

The online application process is fairly easy: create a profile, load pertinent documentation (cover letter, transcripts, etc.), and you can apply to positions.

The phone interview went fairly well. I spoke with three people (an HR representative, an assistant director, and a data analyst) for approximately 45 minutes answering some basic questions about my experience and expanding on what was in my resume.

The face-to-face interview was a different story. It consisted of two panel interviews, each with three people. The first panel interview was the "technical" interview and the second was more "administrative" in nature. The "technical" interview consisted of three people (a senior data analyst and two assistant directors), the "administrative" interview also consisted of four people (an HR representative, two assistant directors, and a data analyst).

The "technical" interview started off well. I was asked my experience with using SQL and SAS, and there was some discussion about using other programs such as Stata. About half way through, one of the interviewers became hostile with their line of questioning: he began mocking my experience; he interrupted one of the other interviewer while she was asking me a question to interject his opinion, not allowing her to finish her question or for me to reply; and, his body language, tone of voice, and attitude definitely showed his lack of professionalism. I have experience dealing with hostile people in the workplace, but this was disconcerting since this behavior is not typical of any interview process in which I have participated. As someone who has been working in the "data analytics space" for 10 years, this turned me off to the agency and the job, especially since this hostile person would have been part of the on-boarding and training process for this job.

The "administrative" interview was a repeat of the phone interview: reviewing my resume, asking some questions about my pay, experience with dealing with conflicting deadlines, etc., nothing too difficult and the people were much friendlier. To be honest, however, the damage was done in the first face-to-face interview session and I had already decided to not accept a job offer if one were to be extended.

As I mentioned in my opening paragraph, I was relieved to not receive a job offer because I had already determined to not accept it. Why? Because turning down a job for a Federal government agency can be looked upon negatively if you apply to that same agency in the future.

Would I apply to the GAO in the future? Possibly. They do some interesting work, but nothing that is groundbreaking: they are a glorified business analytics group writ large.

Interview Questions

  • Have you ever dealt with large datasets?   1 Answer
  • What statistical software do you use? Describe your experience with SQL and SAS.   1 Answer
  • Have you ever presented research findings to managers or higher-level leadership?   1 Answer
  • Describe how you manage your time and work load with multiple, competing tasks and deadlines.   1 Answer
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