Business Analyst Interview Questions in San Diego, CA | Glassdoor
Business Analyst Interview Questions in San Diego, CA

Business Analyst Interview Questions in San Diego, CA

When interviewing a candidate for a business analyst role, employers are looking to assess your analytical problem-solving skills as well as your communication and collaboration skills. Be prepared to analyze a business case study and answer behavioral questions that often test your ability to handle challenging stakeholders or tight deadlines. Business analysts must also be creative thinkers, so expect to tackle a few unusual brainteasers that are designed to see how well you can think through a complex problem.

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You own a Beach souvenier shop that sells primarily 4 items. Calculate Profit per month. What are some issues you could forsee in your revenue streams? After additional information is given, calculate seasonal income.

2 Answers

Being told to calculate profit is always a tricky scenario, especially for an analysts perspective. You want to be clear about the profit they actually want calculated. Remembering that profit, in base form, is going to represent anything after that break even point. Simply put, as the owner, your salary is going to be configured into the operating costs. So, let's say your operating cost is 100k a year and this includes your salary, then any dollar made after 100k is "profit". However, this does not totally detail other forms of profit, such as economic profit. This is where you are measuring and analyzing missed and made opportunities versus the profit you brought in. So, one issue you could foresee in your revenue stream is that carrying a 5th product may increase opportunity costs, but potentially the 5th item causes the 4th item to sell at a higher rate as they're often sold in conjunction. Studies show, for example, that a person that buys a beach volleyball is not likely to buy a volleyball net. But those that buy a beach volleyball are 3x as likely to buy a portable air pump. I don't mean to over think it, but you'll notice there's four items that are being sold. You own a business that is contingent about the seasons of the year, which there are also four. To me this speaks directly to the significance of weather in your business and this is not something the employer would want you to miss. Issues in revenue streams here would be a lack of product adjustment due to weather. To me, in an instance like this, if an employer asks you such a soft, information less question, you are doing yourself a disservice if you do not start asking them questions about what they want. Be sure to clarify if they're asking you to calculate profit or forecast profit.

From an analyst’s perspective, simply being told to calculate profit can be a tricky demand, especially in an interview setting. You want to be clear about the profit they actually want calculated. Remembering that profit, in base form, is going to represent anything after the break-even point. Simply put, as the owner, your salary is going to be configured into the operating costs. So, let's say your operating cost is 100k a year, and this includes your salary, then any dollar made after 100k is "profit". However, this does not totally detail other forms of profit, such as economic profit. This is where you are measuring and analyzing missed and made opportunities versus the profit you brought in. So, one issue you could foresee in your revenue stream is that carrying a 5th product may increase operating costs; but potentially, the 5th item causes the 4th item to sell at a higher rate as they're often sold in conjunction. Studies show, for example, that a person that buys a beach volleyball is not likely to buy a volleyball net. But those that buy a beach volleyball are 3x as likely to buy a portable air pump. I don't mean to over think it, but you'll notice there's four items being sold. You own a business that is contingent upon the seasons of the year (also four). To me this speaks directly to the significance of weather in your business and this is not something the employer would want you to miss. Issues in revenue streams here would be a lack of product adjustment due to weather. To me, in an instance like this, if an employer asks you such a soft, information less question, you are doing yourself a disservice if you do not start asking them questions about what they want. Be sure to clarify if they're asking you to calculate profit or forecast profit. Also, any time someone asks you what issues could arise in revenue streams, immediately think SWOT. Strength, Weaknesses, Opportunities, Threats. Always think SWOT when heading into any BA or PM position. It will quickly allow you to analyze almost any situation.

I don't care about all of your management experience, I just want you to tell me about business requirements you did in the past few years.

1 Answer

Give examples where you had to resolve a conflict?

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Whats your weakness? What do you know about the company?

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level of ERP skill set

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What is challenging in your mind? How would you perform analysis on a sample software development request? What questions would you ask? What tools would you use?

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Explain the process of either getting ready for work, or making an omelette.

1 Answer

How explain yourself?

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Business case given was estimating the costs and profitability of a hotel and drawing a graph showing quantity sold versus revenue. The directions were vague at best. I recommend you ask for more clarification, I sure could have used it.

They basically asked me about my background and experience. Questions ranged from ethics to how I performed certain tasks and duties. I was asked about my family life, what I liked to do for fun, what are my strengths and what are my weaknesses.

1 Answer