Director Interview Questions in San Diego, CA | Glassdoor

Director Interview Questions in San Diego, CA

"When applying for a position as a director, be prepared to have your leadership skills and judgement tested by many case studies. These scenarios help employers understand what kind of leader you will be for a team or department at their company, so confidence, quick thinking, and examples of how you have fixed similar problems in the past will be highly advantageous towards receiving an offer."

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What were some of your biggest challenges in dealing with difficult clients and how did you overcome them?

1 Answer

Clients disgruntled because their were errors on their ads. sometimes it's the publishers fault, but many times it can be the clients error. I always remain calm, let the person speak, really listen, and then they usually calm down. At that point I assure them that we'll make it right. I explain that I will research the situation to find the best possible solution. I make them feel valued and treat their situation as top priority.

Why are you seeking work?

2 Answers

How would you expand the reach and garner more market share within our industry?

1 Answer

Around the house, would you say that you are a maintainer or a fix-it-when-it-breaks sort of guy.

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In depth inquiry into what and how I did what I claimed on my resume. The who, what and why of the choices I'd made with prior employment changes. What was I great at? Why did I want to be an executive search professional?

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Are you willing to travel up to 60% to 70% for the first 6 months to a year between our HQ in San Luis Obispo and our Arizona office?

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Are you willing to take a CCAT test and a personality assessment test?

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(President of ACM) What does my bio say on the company website?

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I really can't think of any challenging or unexpected questions. It was a very entry level standard interview conducted by a potential subordinate. as mentioned majority of conversation was centered around interviewers superiority???

1 Answer

None of the questions were particularly difficult, but they lacked clarity. The hiring manager did not have a clear view of the role of the new position, and what was stated was different from the posted position.

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