Operations Manager Interview Questions in San Francisco, CA | Glassdoor

Operations Manager Interview Questions in San Francisco, CA

"Employers want operations managers with the leadership, managerial, and interpersonal skills to effectively manage daily operations, evaluate operational costs, and make personnel decisions. Be prepared to discuss your management style as well as your experience handling conflicts and motivating teams to meet deadlines. You should also be ready to answer operational questions such as how you would improve processes to cut costs. A bachelor's degree in management or a similar field of study is required, with a master's degree being ideal."

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"There's nothing you can do here that we can't build on our own in two weeks." But that was just one particularly awful interviewer - a product manager, I think. There was pretty much no way I'd agree to join Twitter after that interaction.

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This was part of an acquisition discussion, so my experience may not be typical. But it's still the one I had.

Please describe your most difficult customer interaction and how you handled it.

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Tell us about your ability to be flexible.

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You have to be in the culture and knowledgable of fashion

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Let's throw a dose of reality in now: If you could only allocate drivers on a minimum 8-hour shift basis and you could increase hourly drivers by 20% over the supply listed, how would that change your allocation strategy above? Please do the following: 1. Explain your methodology for reallocation 2. Suggest the results you expect to result 3. How would you manage a fleet of drivers to do what you want? Here's a description of the variables: Compl = the number of completed trips Eyes = the unique number of people who opened the Uber app Zeroes = the unique number of people who opened the Uber app but when they did so they saw no cars available. A zero can occur because there is not enough supply (drivers) on the road or because the person looking at the Uber app isn't within a certain mileage range of the available cars. Avail Drivers = number of drivers on the Uber network in total (receiving either commission or hourly payment) Hourly = number of drivers on the Uber network receiving hourly payment So, for example, from this data: At 7am on May 16th, 6 people opened the Uber app and all of those folks saw cars available (0 zeros). We completed 1 trip. And, we had 6 drivers on the system of which 6 were scheduled and paid hourly. We had no drivers at that hour on the system out of their own free will. In contrast, at 8pm, we had 6 hourly drivers and 2 commission drivers. Assuming you had hour-by-hour control of hourly drivers, how would you reallocate (not increase - just reallocate) the current supply of hourly drivers (given you have no control over commission hours) to better serve demand? Please do the following: 1. Describe the metrics you would use to drive this decision 2. Explain your methodology for reallocation 3. Give a brief summary of your reallocation (please give specific examples) 4. Suggest the results you expect to result (please give specific examples)

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Mostly asked for insight into my previous company's operations. I think they got as much information from me as they probably should have.

Create an implementation plan for an internal tool roll-out.

How could you rebuild trust with Uber drivers?

How would you get an uber driver to not leave their position?

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How would you convince drivers to work holidays?