Senior designer Interview Questions

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Amazon
Senior User Experience Designer was asked...May 11, 2010

How do you form positive relationships with developers and/or stakeholders?

1 Answers

Be on their side. Show them that rather than being interference in a relationship, that you can serve as an interlocutor. Bring evidence. Less

Amazon

How would you handle the hypothetical situation where one or more designers try to dominate the conversation and do not seem to be listening to other members of the team?

1 Answers

1.. Acknowledge that they are making a point that seems is important to them.1. 2. Remind everyone that collecting iterative feedback is important because it makes the product better. And solicit feedback from other people who have not yet had a chance to speak up. 3. Ask them to tie their concerns/points to specific usage scenarios. Is this a feature or design aspect that is nice to have or critical? Less

Amazon

How do you decide which features to drive UX design for a specific release?

1 Answers

This was an hour-long conversation. Focused on linking business requirements and usage scenarios with features and a product roadmap for specific features. And design gates. And UX consistency across a product suite. Less

Amazon

Question from director: "... four people need to cross a bridge at night, there is only one flash light and only one person can walk on the bridge at a time. How do would you get them all across the bridge?"

9 Answers

If a UX director asks this question, he wants to see how much of real UX designer you are, and how methodical you approach this task. A good UX designer needs to understand the real problem first. Based on the information given we can only make broad assumptions. A hypothesis based on limited data is a good starting point, but before we jump to premature "solutions", the first task is to do more digging. We need to ask questions (and do research) to understand the actual problem before we can propose a a fitting solution - a user experience that truly solves the unique problem these four people have in their specific situation (it might even turn out that they don't need to cross a bridge at night but need something completely else, but let's not go that far here). So - based on the information given, we don't know what type of bridge it is (does it have a railing, is the bridge lit, short, long, is there even pavement or gravel and potholes, is there traffic, etc...), we need to understand WHY only one person can walk on the bridge and whether the people even need to walk (they might be able to drive, maybe there is a bus that can transport them). Where is the flash light, what type of flash light is it And who are these individuals? What is the relationship between these people? Do they all have the same motivation to cross the bridge? WHY do they need to cross the bridge? Is that really what they need, or do they have a different problem? Also, are they all on the same side? Why do they need to cross the bridge at night, do they have to cross the bridge every night or just once? Etc. etc. -You get the point. In addition: What are my resources to get them over the bridge? Which technical and business opportunities and constraints do I have? In which time duration do I have to get them cross the bridge? Fun exercise for a UX candidate. Less

Nope, only 1 person at a time, remember? just have the last person shine the flashlight on the bridge while the other people cross and then cross last. Less

Well, why do you need a flashlight to cross a bridge? A blind person can cross a bridge, no? Can you not keep a hand on the railing and feel your way across? Can you not feel the rumble of traffic passing and keep away? Sure, it feels safer with a light, so let's go with that. You need to see what's ahead, so the first three people take turns shining the light from behind as one person crosses at a time. Then the fourth person crosses with the flashlight. Less

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CNBC

If I know TV design lingo.

8 Answers

I was new to the field, so my answer was no.

Yes

Yes

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BlackBerry

Would you say the iPhone is a competitor to the Blackberry

6 Answers

It just goes to show how history teaches lessons - That was a good answer at the time and it was the right answer because that's what RIM wanted the truth to be. Not surprised they offered you the job. Less

Thanks Ooops! It was clear they were nervous, and i have to say the opportunity is still there for RIM, but their competitors are not iPhone, its Samsung, HTC, Windows8. Those are the real challenges for them. If you have a LinkedIn profile let me know Less

Yes and no, both are smartphones and provide similar functionality but the Blackberry is more productivity driven while the IPhone is more "user friendly" and entertainment driven. They do compete but they appeal to different segments of the market. Blackberry for the corporate/ government sectors and IPhone for the domestic. Less

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Google

Whiteboard a solution to enhancing the experience of driving a car.

1 Answers

This was an open-ended design exercise to see how you go about brainstorming a problem and arriving at some solutions. Less

Deloitte

What is your education?

5 Answers

Tell them the actual education, experience or previous salary.

Textile Dying & Printing Diploma

Textile Dyeing & Printing Diploma

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Select Design

Are you going to be able to stay interested with our client base?

4 Answers

How do you perform under pressure?

Yes

Of course. Ask open ended questions

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Pixelstat

Do you how to use Adobe XD

3 Answers

Yes

Yes.

Yes

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