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User Interface Engineer Interview Questions

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what is the difference in a class and id in CSS?

3 Answers

class can be used over and over in a document for a style and an ID can only be used once for a specific section such as id=header, etc...

An element with a given ID can be styled in CSS using '#' followed by the given ID. The HTML standard states that IDs are unique and will only correspond to one element. For example: #header-logo { background-image: url(''/images/logo.jpg') no-repeat center center; } Elements with a given class can be styled in CSS using '.' followed by the given class. Any number of elements can share a class. For example: .blue-box { background-color: #99f; border: 1px solid #333; margin: 10px 0; height: 100px; width: 100px; } Bonus points: Unless the HTML is non-standards compliant, styling an element of a given ID should never include the element's parents or its own tag name. For example, this is bad: p#intro-paragraph { font-size: 12px; margin: 10px 30px; } It will first look at every <p> tag, then compare each of them against the ID "intro-paragraph". For efficiency, this will do: #intro-paragraph { font-size: 12px; margin: 10px 30px; } Also, it's possible to chain classes in CSS: .blue-box.first-box { margin-top: 0px; } Note that older versions of internet explorer (as recent as 7 I believe) do not support this. For an element with both classes "blue-box" and "first-box", be careful not to write this as ".blue-box .first-box { ... }". This is because the space between the classes indicates a parent-child relationship and so it will look for an element within the blue-box with a class of first-box (undesired).

An element with a given ID can be styled in CSS using '#' followed by the given ID. The HTML standard states that IDs are unique and will only correspond to one element. For example: #header-logo { background-image: url(''/images/logo.jpg') no-repeat center center; } Elements with a given class can be styled in CSS using '.' followed by the given class. Any number of elements can share a class. For example: .blue-box { background-color: #99f; border: 1px solid #333; margin: 10px 0; height: 100px; width: 100px; } Bonus points: Unless the HTML is non-standards compliant, styling an element of a given ID should never include the element's parents or its own tag name. For example, this is bad: p#intro-paragraph { font-size: 12px; margin: 10px 30px; } It will first look at every <p> tag, then compare each of them against the ID "intro-paragraph". For efficiency, this will do: #intro-paragraph { font-size: 12px; margin: 10px 30px; } Also, it's possible to chain classes in CSS: .blue-box.first-box { margin-top: 0px; } Note that older versions of internet explorer (as recent as 7 I believe) do not support this. For an element with both classes "blue-box" and "first-box", be careful not to write this as ".blue-box .first-box { ... }". This is because the space between the classes indicates a parent-child relationship and so it will look for an element within the blue-box with a class of first-box (undesired).

Write a function in Javascript that takes Roman numerals (in String form) and convert it to decimal form. Assume the string is well-formed.

2 Answers

Well, first off, do you have any questions for me?

1 Answer

What is a closure in javascript?

1 Answer

On phone: - Which data structure will you use to implement the mathematical set? - What is the difference between synchronized and volatile java keywords? - What is the EDT (event dispatch thread) and how does it work?

No surprises, really. Everything covered was what I expected an employer to inquire about regarding the field of expertise applied for. Some people have tripped over surprise hurdles in interviews, however the management and peers were specific about what they wanted and I was please to not get any surprise questions.

Find K-th node in given Linked list. What is the difference between == and === in javascript?

The most difficult question was the 8-hour test, which involved deriving a novel and fairly-involved algorithm, significant CSS/HTML/JS coding, and plenty of opportunities to get something subtly wrong.

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