Alvarez & Marsal Seattle Office | Glassdoor

Alvarez & Marsal Seattle, WA

3.0
StarStarStarStarStar
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Employees rate Seattle 21.5% lower than the overall average

Alvarez & Marsal Seattle, WA Reviews

  • "Great company"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Intern - Valuation Services in Seattle, WA
    Former Intern - Valuation Services in Seattle, WA
    Recommends
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Alvarez & Marsal as an intern (Less than a year)

    Pros

    I interned with Alvarez and Marsal over the summer. The people there are great to work with and always positive.

    Cons

    I can't think of many cons that I experienced while working with this company. Since my time there was short as an intern I can't give an accurate answer to this question.

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Alvarez & Marsal Seattle, WA Jobs

Alvarez & Marsal Seattle, WA Salaries

Salaries in $ (USD)
Average
Min
Max
$137,436 per year
$119k
$153k
$137,436 per year
$119k
$153k
$181,353 per year
$152k
$207k
$181,353 per year
$152k
$207k
2 salaries
About $61k - $130k
$61k
$130k
About $61k - $130k
$61k
$130k

Alvarez & Marsal Seattle, WA Interviews

Experience

Experience
100%
0%
0%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview
100%

Difficulty

3.3
Average

Difficulty

Hard
Average
Easy
  1. Helpful (10)  

    Consultant Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Seattle, WA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied through college or university. The process took 4+ weeks. I interviewed at Alvarez & Marsal (Seattle, WA) in March 2010.

    Interview

    I applied for a new graduate consultant position through my university's career center. A few weeks later I was invited for an on-campus interview with a senior director and a current consultant. The interview was relatively relaxed and included a variety of personality, situational ("tell me about a time when..."), and background questions. The two interviewers were very good at conducting a back-and-forth discussion rather than a straight-from-the-book interview. I felt the interview was one of my best and left with a very positive impression of the company.

    About one week later I was invited back for an interview with a managing director. The interview took place at a public cafe, which was a mixed bag. On the one hand, the public environment made for a more casual, more informal interview that I typically excel at. On the other hand, I was extremely conscious of my etiquette because we were eating and drinking. The interviewer asked specific, yet open-ended questions such as "tell me three things you like about website X and one thing you would change about it and how you would do it." It was obvious the interviewer was intelligent and knew his stuff. Regardless of the environment, I was very pleased with the interview and interviewer.

    Another week or so later I was invited back for a final interview at the company's local office. The interview began first thing in the morning and lasted about 3 to 4 hours total. First, I interviewed with a director. Most of her questions were typical interview questions such as "tell me more about this on your resume" and "tell me about a time when..." The interviewer also asked me an algorithm question that somewhat caught me off-guard. I felt I did an OK job answering her question, but not as well I should have or wanted to answer it.

    My next interview was with a consultant I would potentially work with for my first project. He had a great personality and asked several fun, yet challenging questions. For example, he asked me to estimate the number of windows in the city, with the focus being more on how you calculate your estimate and less on the actual estimate. It was different than the typical interview and was a great opportunity to showcase my critical thinking skills.

    Finally I interviewed again with the managing director I previously met at a cafe. His questions focused more on why I wanted to work as a consultant and how my long-term career goals would fit the company. I appreciated the interviewers questions because they showed he and the company were concerned with long-term relationships instead of just short-term opportunities. The interview concluded with the managing director stating the company wanted to hire me and a promise that he would be in touch before the end of the week to discuss the specifics.

    True to his word, I heard back from the managing director promptly. He made a verbal offer, which I accepted, and told me operations/HR would contact me shortly to complete the requisite paperwork.

    All in all, I was very impressed with the people and the entire interview process. Everyone I met with had a great attitude and made a positive impression on me. In addition, everyone kept their word and contacted me when they promised they would contact me. I cannot say enough good things about this company and its people.

    Interview Questions

    • Construct an algorithm that identifies at-risk students and notifies teachers, parents, etc.   Answer Question

    Negotiation

    I asked if salary is negotiable and was told it could be for individuals with more experience or specific skill sets.

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