GEICO Rockville Office | Glassdoor

GEICO Rockville, MD

GEICO Rockville, MD Reviews

  • "Great Things At GEICO"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Diversity & Inclusion
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Undwerwriting Analyst in Rockville, MD
    Current Employee - Senior Undwerwriting Analyst in Rockville, MD
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at GEICO full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Dynamic, quick pace environment. Constant changes and always looking for feedback and improvements.

    Cons

    Goals are subjective. Recently the changes to the goals are becoming for fact based.

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GEICO Rockville, MD Jobs

GEICO Rockville, MD Salaries

Salaries in $ (USD)
Average
Min
Max
$56,711 per year
$50k
$66k
$56,711 per year
$50k
$66k
$96,701 per year
$94k
$100k
$96,701 per year
$94k
$100k
About $53k - $63k
$53k
$63k
About $53k - $63k
$53k
$63k

GEICO Rockville, MD Interviews

Experience

Experience
33%
17%
50%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview
100%

Difficulty

2.8
Average

Difficulty

Hard
Average
Easy
  1. Helpful (5)  

    Auto Damage Adjuster Trainee Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Rockville, MD
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 1 day. I interviewed at GEICO (Rockville, MD) in October 2019.

    Interview

    So here is how the Role Play interview goes:
    Basically, you feel like it is your first day as an adjuster, and everyone else called out sick. You have to figure out this new job by yourself, and WING IT - the best you can. Winging it does not really work either, since they gather up all of your forms and materials and evaluate everything you did afterwards. There is no real way to prepare for this unless you had all of the material and itinerary before hand.
    I was placed in a mock office. The instructor explained that after I listened to a 30 minute long CD, he would enter the room several times pretending to be a customer, repair shop mechanic, etc. The instructor explained that he would be in full character, and not to ask him for help in the process.
    I listened to a 30 minute long CD (which playback quality sounded like a distant AM radio station, so you had to listen very carefully) The CD explained what was going to happen over the next hour or so, and I followed along, examining the two stacks of paper work that were in front of me. These were claim forms, estimate forms, blank checks and city mapping items.
    I basically got 30 minutes to listen to very detailed instructions on what calls and customers I would get and what forms and paper work to use for each. This was a lot of information to take in during this time, being I had never done anything like this before.
    The instructor came in pretending to have a damaged item. I had to fumble through paperwork to figure out a total cost of repairs, figure the deductible, and so on based on mock estimate forms. Very intense. I was on the spot and nervous.
    I got through that, and the instructor left. He came back in, gave me a folder, then left. The folder had information for a mock customer who is going to call me in a few minutes. The instructor re-entered and handed me a cell phone, that had the mock customer on the line. The customer asked about a claim that was in review by an adjuster who was now on vacation. I had to fumble through this file, and explain to the customer that the repairs were now more that the original estimate, and the original adjuster was on vacation. Once again, I had to figure out and estimate and figure deductible.
    After this, the instructor came in pretending to be a irritated repair tech, who wanted immediate approval of his repair estimate. I argued that his labor hours were to high, and he left.
    Between the above scenarios, I had to find time to use a time based grid-map, and calculate travel time to about 8 different locations, and figure in the estimate time needed, total all of this up, and try to decide if I should push any of the appointments into the next day.
    This process can make you feel so lost, and defeated before you even get started. Interviewees will sometimes just walk out when they start to feel overwhelmed. On the day I was there, one of them left in the middle of listening to the instructional CD !
    I believe that if you did well on the roll play, immediately afterwards you would talk with a hiring manager. I did not. I got an e-mail at 9AM the next morning advising that I was not selected.
    Good luck. You'll need it !

    Interview Questions

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