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SendGrid Denver, CO

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SendGrid Denver, CO Reviews

  • "Seriously the best career choice I've ever made"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Product in Denver, CO
    Current Employee - Product in Denver, CO
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at SendGrid full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    - culture and people are amazing, they challenge you and push you to be the best version of yourself.
    - decision making process is astounding for a company of our size. Product, finance and engineering decisions are made in a very data-driven way.
    - Willing to discuss the hard topics and make the most informed decision.
    - Benefits are amazing, free lunch everyday is fantastic, i hope we don't lose this.
    - If you're motivated and willing to work hard, you can be recognized and tasked with more responsibility. I've seen many people grow their careers here and be promoted every year based on their performance and determination.

    Cons

    - typical pains related to integrating with Twilio after the acquisition in Feb of 2019. Most painful of which is the figuring out how we make decisions now as one larger company. (Twilio has less process / standard way to make decisions, SendGrid has a formalized process).
    - The general energy of the company is lower now after the Twilio acquisition – still positive but now that we're not a standalone, public company, there appears to be less control over our business (email, email marketing) destiny.
    - Culture of Twilio, while close to SendGrid's, is definitely different and will take some time to feel part of one

    Advice to Management

    Keep working to make Twilio better by adopting and incorporating the best processes, people and systems across the two companies. There is a lot to learn from the employees at both companies that, if implemented, could result in an awesome company.

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SendGrid Denver, CO Photos

SendGrid photo of: Employees Using the Photo Booth at KASA
SendGrid photo of: Servant Leadership in Action From CEO Sameer Dholakia
SendGrid photo of: Gridders Playing Giant Jenga
SendGrid photo of: Gridders Building "Connective Tissue"
SendGrid photo of: Work Hard, Play Harder—Minute to Win It Games
SendGrid photo of: Employees Playing Cornhole

SendGrid Denver, CO Salaries

Salaries in $ (USD)
Average
Min
Max
$97,730 per year
$81k
$113k
$97,730 per year
$81k
$113k
$48,248 per year
$43k
$51k
$48,248 per year
$43k
$51k
$134,065 per year
$127k
$146k
$134,065 per year
$127k
$146k

SendGrid Denver, CO Interviews

Experience

Experience
44%
20%
36%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview
44%
28%
24%
4

Difficulty

2.8
Average

Difficulty

Hard
Average
Easy
  1. Helpful (5)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Denver, CO
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 5 days. I interviewed at SendGrid (Denver, CO).

    Interview

    Went through the HR screening process and was later scheduled to have a technical interview with one of their senior software engineers. The technical interview went over generic questions about design patterns like "what is polymorphism", etc. and later went on to use a collaborative text editor only to be asked to implement a binary search method. The description of the position listed PHP as the primary language and made no mention of any language were you would ever need to [re-]implement something like this, thus I ended the interview. Forming this same question as a pre-interview exercise would have been much more appropriate. I would never take a position where I had to solve difficult problems that require concentration while having someone breathing down my neck, and for the same reason I would never take a position that screens employees utilizing this setting.

    There is an unlimited list of programming concepts that one needs to selectively navigate depending on the requirements of the specific role or craft you want to work in/with. Asking questions that do not apply to that role during an interview is poor form. Test the knowledge and experience relative to the role instead of just trying to test what a candidate doesn't know (you'll pass up on plenty of great programmers). I've worked with plenty of people in the past that were better at reading technical articles and explaining design patterns while not knowing when and when not to apply them, much less being able to get work done in a reasonable time-frame.

    Interview Questions

    • Implement a binary search method; I fully expected the next question to be "describe a btree structure and it's variants". :)   2 Answers
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