ThousandEyes San Francisco Office | Glassdoor

ThousandEyes San Francisco, CA

4.8
StarStarStarStarStar
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Employees rate San Francisco 3% higher than the overall average

ThousandEyes San Francisco, CA Reviews

  • "Great for career growth"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in San Francisco, CA
    Current Employee - Software Engineer in San Francisco, CA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at ThousandEyes full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    - Strong engineering culture that cares about doing things correctly and with quality instead of rushing out half-baked features
    - Merit based, people who contribute significantly are fast tracked in the promotion/raise cycle.
    - Employees are given a lot of ownership over the code, allowing them to make design/architectural decisions
    - No micromanagement, a largely autonomous culture where you really can spend the majority of your time writing code
    - Everyone has the opportunity to voice their opinion and get involved in the product management process or help shape the technical direction of the product
    - Great product that solves real problems
    - The company has a solid business case and track record of growth
    - Good work/life balance... people probably average 9 hours/day (except on release days)
    - No arrogance policy, the company makes an effort to hire people who are pleasant to work with.
    - Typical startup perks. Catered lunches every day, stocked kitchen, all types of coffee machines, medical/dental/vision premiums covered, unlimited leave policy

    Cons

    - Sometimes the lunches aren't very good
    - You have to stay later on release days (every 2 weeks) so you can be available to fix any issues with your code. Usually about
    - There's an expectation that people are responsible for their own work, so you need to manage your time to ensure you can finish your tasks on time and don't over allocate yourself.
    - Not a lot of handholding which can be a problem for somebody that's not as independent

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ThousandEyes San Francisco, CA Photos

ThousandEyes photo of: Fed employees=happy employees :)
ThousandEyes photo of: The Fortress of not-so-Solitude
ThousandEyes photo of: Coding away
ThousandEyes photo of: Collaborative workspaces
ThousandEyes photo of: 360 degree views of the city
ThousandEyes photo of: Hack Week 2015 winners

ThousandEyes San Francisco, CA Jobs

ThousandEyes San Francisco, CA Salaries

Salaries in $ (USD)
Average
Min
Max
$131,416 per year
$125k
$135k
$131,416 per year
$125k
$135k
About $96k - $128k
$96k
$128k
About $96k - $128k
$96k
$128k
2 salaries
About $105k - $129k
$105k
$129k
About $105k - $129k
$105k
$129k

ThousandEyes San Francisco, CA Interviews

Experience

Experience
57%
4%
39%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview
52%
19%
15%
7
7

Difficulty

3.0
Average

Difficulty

Hard
Average
Easy
  1.  

    Customer Success Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Employee in San Francisco, CA
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 3 weeks. I interviewed at ThousandEyes (San Francisco, CA) in January 2018.

    Interview

    The initial phone screen occurred in two parts:

     - The first was a review of the company and position
    - The second was a series of 20+ questions spanning 5 general topics

    This takes some time, and is obviously to determine you areas of strength and weakness.

    The second portion of the interview process is a homework assignment, comprised of 8 questions, that cover a broad swath of topics. While I would imagine that many people, who are taking the "shotgun" approach to job searches, may not be willing to invest the time to answer the questions to completion; I was pleasantly surprised by how methodical the assignment was. It was obvious that they were interested in aptitude and research abilities; and not simply how well you perform on standardized tests. I can honestly say that the exercise was worth doing, even if they didn’t offer me a position.

    The third step in the process is a series of in-person interviews: one with a co-worker; one with the test proctor; one with the immediate manager; and one with the department head. The tone is conversational; and they are very open.

    At the end of the in-person interview, however, is a grill session in which you are given an hour to review a simulated customer support event. This is followed by an emulated “2am” support call with 4 people asking you questions in real-time. It is obvious that they want you to do well; but that they also want to challenge you.

    I would suggest to applicants that they self-select early. If you enjoy learning, and have developed the discipline to be auto-didactic, then this is the place for you. They have a great attitude and believe in sharing information.

    Interview Questions

    • What was your impression of the product during your evaluation?   1 Answer
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