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Allrecipes.com Overview

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Seattle, WA
51 to 200 employees
Unknown
Subsidiary or Business Segment
Internet
$10 to $25 million (USD) per year
Unknown
Got Cravings? Allrecipes.com can help you satisfy them with one of their 40,000 recipes. The community-driven website not only offers recipes, but also meal- and diet-planning, and newsletters. Its advice section offers articles, cooking tips, step-by-step photo tutorials ... Read more

Allrecipes.com Reviews

3.6
StarStarStarStarStar
Rating TrendsRating Trends
Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
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Stan Pavlosky
19 Ratings
  • "Analyst"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Allrecipes.com full-time

    Pros

    Great product, office location and teammates

    Cons

    Changes in management and leadership

See All 47 Reviews

Allrecipes.com Photos

Allrecipes.com photo of: Allrecipes Culture Camp!
Allrecipes.com photo of: During one of our many parties
Allrecipes.com photo of: Coffee cart on staff meeting days
Allrecipes.com photo of: Shuffleboard table
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Allrecipes.com Interviews

Experience

Experience
67%
0%
33%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview
57%
29%
14%

Difficulty

2.3
Average

Difficulty

Hard
Average
Easy
  1. Helpful (1)  

    Director Level Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Seattle, WA
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Difficult Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Allrecipes.com (Seattle, WA).

    Interview

    I applied for a Director position. I'll be honest, I was absolutely 100% perfect fit in terms of my background and experience. I was contacted within 24 hours of my online application. I had a brief conversation with the HR contact (about 15 minutes), and then talked to the hiring manager that same afternoon for about 20 minutes while she admitted she was doing driving home from work.

    I was whisked into a full interview loop for eight hours the following week -- I interviewed with more than 12 people over the course of the day. Given the go-ahead, I was sent to interview with the CEO (Stan) just two days later.

    However, when I met with Stan, he indicated that the job was completely different than what had been advertised and what had been described to me by the hiring manager and by pretty much everyone I talked with during my interviews.

    It was very odd.

    So he asked me how I would do a job that I hadn't applied for right. I am very adaptable and had some experience with that area, so I dug right in. We talked for two hours and he quizzed me at length. I ended up drawing out a strategy on the whiteboard about how I would go about one of the key tasks. He said, "Wow, that's just what I'm looking for." At the end of the interview, he took notes on when he thought I could start. He even said, "I look forward to working with you" when he shook my hand as we finished up. I had the job in the bag.

    But weirdly, when he walked me out, he didn't seem to know that I lived in Seattle which I thought was odd since he said he "really studied" my resume -- which has 20 years of experience -- all of it in Seattle. It hit me in the gut that maybe he confused me with someone else? I don't know. He left me at the receptionist desk, and I realized I forgot my coat in the meeting room next to his office. When I was walking back to get it, he was taking a photo of the whiteboard with his phone and then he slipped back into his office.

    That same day, I wrote him a thank you email and reattached my resume. I sent a thank you email to the hiring manager and the HR contact. Then -- I heard nothing. Zero. Nothing. Nada. Never.

    Over the next two weeks, I wrote to the HR contact four times. He never wrote back. I mean, OK, you went with a different candidate. The CEO confused me with someone else and offered the job to another candidate. Whatever, take a minute and let me know. I wrote to the hiring manager. Nothing. Two weeks' afterward, I wrote to let them know I had another offer so I just wanted to confirm I was out of the running. Totally gave them out. Nothing. Not a peep. Not even a form letter.

    It was two years ago and I never heard a single comment back after I spent at least 12 hours interviewing. This was for a Director level position. Just totally weird.

    I know several people who work at the company and ran into one at a conference. She said, "Oh, I heard you failed the Stan interview." Which I thought, "Um, if I failed it, why did he keep me for more than two HOURS? Why did he take a photo of a whiteboard? Why did he ask me when I could start?"

    It was very weird and I've never had any other experience like that with a company - just the absolute zero silence/radio silence. No letter saying "Thanks but no thanks" nothing.

    Interview Questions

    • "Oh, so you thought you were interviewing for a different job? Yeah, I get that. You could probably do that other job in your sleep." - Stan, the CEO   Answer Question
See All 7 Interviews

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