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Seminole Electric Overview

Tampa, FL
201 to 500 employees
1948
Nonprofit Organization
Utilities
$1 to $2 billion (USD) per year
Seminole Electric Cooperative is one of the largest generation and transmission (G&T) cooperatives in the country.

Seminole’s purpose is to provide safe, affordable, and reliable wholesale power to its nine Member distribution ... Read more

Mission: To provide reliable, competitively priced, wholesale electric power to our 9 Member distribution electric cooperatives. Serving 42 counties across Florida, we are a dedicated community presence with roots that date back more than six decades.

Company Updates

  • COVID-19

    Last month, Seminole raised $40,000 for those impacted by COVID-19 in our communities!

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Seminole Electric – Why Work With Us?


In 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Rural Electrification Administration (REA) by executive order to bring electricity to rural communities through the formation of electric cooperatives. In 1937, the REA drafted the Electric Cooperative Corporation Act, a law permitting states to create and operate not-for-profit, member-owned distribution electric cooperatives. The same year, Florida’s first distribution electric cooperatives were formed.

In 1948, Seminole Electric Cooperative was incorporated to give the Member distribution cooperatives buying power by aggregating their demand for electricity. Until the mid-1970s, Seminole remained a “paper G&T.”

However, the 1973 oil crisis prompted a decision by the Seminole Board to build its own coal-fired power plant – the Seminole Generating Station in Palatka, FL. The Seminole Generating Station came online in 1984.

Today, Seminole is one of the largest G&Ts in the country. Its purpose is to provide essential wholesale services to its nine Member distribution electric cooperatives.

Seminole’s primary resources include the Seminole Generating Station (SGS) in northeast Florida and the Richard J. Midulla Generating Station (MGS) in south central Florida. Seminole serves approximately 1.8 million people and businesses in parts of 42 Florida counties. Seminole also owns and maintains more than 350 miles of transmission line.

The Seminole Purpose

What we do

Provide essential wholesale services to our Members through a balanced, diversified portfolio of safe, affordable, and reliable energy resources.

How we do it

With valuable employees who are adaptable, collaborative, conscientious, critical-thinking, outcome-driven, and professional.

What drives us

To be the preferred and trusted energy services provider empowering our Members and the communities we serve.

What we value

Accountability, integrity, and service rooted in the cooperative spirit.

Cooperative Principles

Cooperatives, whether selling electricity or produce, share a common set of principles and values, including self-help and democracy. Known as the “Rochdale Principles,” they not only benefit the cooperatives, but the consumers as well. Introduced to the United States in 1874, the seven Rochdale Principles hold that a cooperative must provide:

1. VOLUNTARY AND OPEN MEMBERSHIP

Cooperatives are voluntary organizations, open to all persons able to use their services and willing to accept the responsibilities of membership, without gender, social, racial, political or religious discrimination.

2. DEMOCRATIC MEMBER CONTROL

Cooperatives are democratic organizations controlled by their members, who actively participate in setting policies and making decisions. The elected representatives are accountable to the membership. In primary cooperatives, members have equal voting rights (one member, one vote) and cooperatives at other levels are organized in a democratic manner.

3. MEMBERS’ ECONOMIC PARTICIPATION

Members contribute equitably to, and democratically control, the capital of their cooperative. At least part of that capital is usually the common property of the cooperative. Members usually receive limited compensation, if any, on capital subscribed as a condition of membership. Members allocate surpluses for any or all of the following purposes: developing the cooperative, possibly by setting up reserves, part of which at least would be indivisible; benefitting members in proportion to their transactions with the cooperative; and supporting other activities approved by the membership.

4. AUTONOMY AND INDEPENDENCE

Cooperatives are autonomous, self-help organizations controlled by their members. If they enter into agreements with other organizations, including governments, or raise capital from external sources, they do so on terms that ensure democratic control by their members and maintain their cooperative autonomy.

5. EDUCATION, TRAINING, AND INFORMATION

Cooperatives provide education and training for their members, elected representatives, managers and employees so they can contribute effectively to the development of their cooperatives. They inform the general public, particularly young people and opinion leaders, about the nature and benefits of cooperation.

6. COOPERATION AMONG COOPERATIVES

By working together through local, national, regional, and international structures, cooperatives improve services, bolster local economies, and deal more effectively with social and community needs.

7. CONCERN FOR COMMUNITY

While focusing on member needs, cooperatives work for the sustainable development of their communities through policies accepted by their members.

As one of the nation’s largest Generation and Transmission (G&T) cooperatives, our reach extends to more than 1.8 million people and businesses across the great state of Florida. Our winning team of skilled professionals is what makes our success possible. From networking, outreach, and planning to finance, maintenance, and education, Seminole Electric Cooperative has a diverse number of career paths for professionals with a wide variety of skill sets, goals, and interests.

As our organization continues to expand, we are always on the lookout for top talent to join our growing professional family. If you’re ready for an electrifying career with tremendous potential for success, we invite you to explore our exciting opportunities.

2019 Directors' Award Recipients

Seminole Electric Cooperative believes in creating a culture that gives back to our people, both professionally and personally. We offer an outstanding benefits package that includes:

  • Generous vacation package
  • 30 minutes from the beaches
  • Comprehensive health plans
  • Wellness incentive program
  • Gym membership reimbursement
  • Free on site gym and fitness classes
  • Pension plan
  • 401(k) employer match
  • Tuition reimbursement
  • Training and Development
  • Paid parental leave
  • And much more!

It’s time to jump start your success – join the Seminole Electric Cooperative today!

Seminole Electric Reviews

  • "Great mid-size organization to work for"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Multimedia Communications Specialist in Tampa, FL
    Current Employee - Multimedia Communications Specialist in Tampa, FL
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Seminole Electric full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Job security, benefits, opportunities for promotion

    Cons

    Minimal leadership/professional development for entry-level employees, health benefits are expensive for families

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Seminole Electric Photos

Seminole Electric photo of: 2019 Directors' Award Recipients
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Seminole Electric Interviews

Experience

Experience
100%
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Getting an Interview

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25%
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  1.  

    Administrative Specialist Interview

    Anonymous Employee in Tampa, FL
    Accepted Offer
    Positive Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Seminole Electric (Tampa, FL).

    Interview

    Very straightforward. 1) Applied online 2) Phone screen with recruiter 3) Onsite visit to complete application, personality profile and skills test 4) panel interview 5) hiring manager called with offer

    Interview Questions

    • They described core values that they seek as a company and asked for examples of situations where I demonstrated skills that aligned to those values.   1 Answer
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Seminole Electric Awards & Accolades

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