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Society for Neuroscience Overview

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www.sfn.org
Washington, DC
51 to 200 employees
1969
Nonprofit Organization
Non-Profit
$25 to $50 million (USD) per year
Unknown
The Society for Neuroscience is the world’s largest organization of scientists and physicians devoted to understanding the brain and nervous system. The nonprofit organization, founded in 1969, now has nearly 40,000 members in more than 90 countries and 130 chapters

Society for Neuroscience Reviews

2.3
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Marty Saggese
19 Ratings
  • "Great place for me"

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Society for Neuroscience full-time

    Pros

    Fast-paced dedicated staff serving one of the most exciting fields in science. Overall, a great place to work if you are a go-getter.

    Cons

    The pace of the organization means it's not a great fit for folks who want to coast.

See All 42 Reviews

Society for Neuroscience Interviews

Interview Experience

Interview Experience
15%
23%
61%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview
91%
8%

Interview Difficulty

2.8
Average

Interview Difficulty

Hard

Average

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  1.  

    Manager Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Neutral Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. I interviewed at Society for Neuroscience.

    Interview

    i was contacted by a recruiter and scheduled a phone screening which was cancelled at the last minute do to a pop-up meeting that the recruiter had. I have never experienced that but I was flexible and rescheduled. Less than 24 hours before the rescheduled screening, I received the name of the people that were interviewing me and a request for a personality screening-which I had about 10 minutes to take. Screening went well and went in for the in person interview. The people interviewing me were very straight forward with their company culture and expectations. I was immediately told that the company doesn't offer a flexible or limited telework option. Through their questions they really wanted to make sure that I wasn't the type to offer new ideas or rock the boat. From the vibe that I got in the interview, they definently want people that are more structured and less creative, out of the box thinkers. Two out of the three people that interviewed me have been with the company less than 2 years--says a lot. Overall they were very straight forward about their infamous company culture and were looking for people that fit that mold. I was a bit shocked because I assume it would be quite difficult to recruit and retain top talent with this vibe but whatever works. This organization may be a good fit for someone that is focused on getting the job done but not interested in generating new ideas on how to get the job done and beyond. Also great for people without children/family commitments as it doesn't offer a basic flexible work option. I think a younger person that wants the experience to put on their resume would do well.

    Interview Questions

    • give me a time were you presented an idea and it wasn't accepted by the team?   Answer Question
See All 15 Interviews

Society for Neuroscience Awards & Accolades

  • Paul G. Rogers Distinguished Organization Advocacy Award, Research!America, 2015
  • Power of A Gold Award, American Society of Association Executives, 2014
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Society for Neuroscience Locations

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