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Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development

Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development Overview

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Nashville, TN
1001 to 5000 employees
1923
Government
Government
Unknown / Non-Applicable per year
Unknown
The Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development (TDLWD) wants state residents to feel safe at work. The agency is dedicated to providing workplace development and creating a healthy work environment. TDLWD provides a variety of services for individuals (career ... Read more

Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development Reviews

2.4
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James G. Neeley
1 Rating
  • "Help Desk Supervisor"

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    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    Former Employee - Help Es Supervisor in Nashville, TN
    Former Employee - Help Es Supervisor in Nashville, TN
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development full-time (More than 10 years)

    Pros

    Great place and people to work

    Cons

    Politics play much too big part of work assignments

    Advice to Management

    Avoid Political Correctness

See All 5 Reviews

Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development Interviews

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  1.  

    Career Specialist Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate in Johnson City, TN
    No Offer
    Negative Experience
    Average Interview

    Application

    I applied online. The process took 2+ months. I interviewed at Tennessee Department of Labor and Workforce Development (Johnson City, TN) in July 2016.

    Interview

    I had to apply online, then complete an online questionnaire with several standard interview questions, then I got a call for an interview, which I participated in. After that, I never heard back. Actually, funny story...I was told in the interview (1.5 hours long) they would submit their paperwork to their HQ in Nashville a week or two later (on a Friday) with their final recommendation. On the Monday morning following that Friday I got a call from "unknown" who asked for someone not me. I asked, who are you? They said "HR". Didn't feel I could stall any longer, so I said, that person is not at this number, and they promptly said "Ok" and hung up. I am sure this was the call giving what's-her-name the job, and they incorrectly called my number. Nice attention to detail there. The whole process took about 2 months, not counting me still waiting for a courtesy call or note of any kind saying "thanks, but no thanks."

    Beware there will be a panel, and they won't tell you this when you call to schedule an appointment. I suppose they are testing to see if you ask. It's hide-the-ball time. Pretty adversarial interview situation really, one person will observe and say nothing. It won't seem adversarial on the surface of things. No one in the panel of three offered me a card, email address, and gave no opportunity time-wise for me to get that information. Was I suppose to pull out a ruled pad and ask them this information in detail? Get it from the receptionist on the way out? Was this yet another test? I sent a thank you hard copy and an email to the head interviewer, but it was probably a waste of time.

    I was not aggressive enough, did not know enough about their bureaucracy and what they do in it. In hindsight, I am glad I didn't get the job for several reasons. How would I know what they do unless I already worked for them? They work inside layers of red tape that even they don't understand. Plus, I have this "bad" habit (being facetious here) saying in an interview "There are actually things I don't know." Honestly people, there are no purple squirrels out there. There is no perfect employee. If someone says they don't know, and they are comfortable with the fact that they don't know everything in the world, that's a GOOD thing.

    Also, they seem to be inordinately focused on getting the unemployed off of unemployment benefits, because this state has no income tax, and so therefor their whole world is focused on the numbers. How many people they can push out the door into some minimum wage job ($7.25/hr in these here parts) to save the state a few bucks, and are not really focused on helping anyone find a career, just a job, and then, huh, they see those same people in another year or two. What a surprise.

    Also, I was probably overqualified. I am not an example of the kind of person they give any help to at all. They help blue collar workers find jobs. They would look at me like I had three heads if I came in looking for guidance on job hunting. Several years ago I visited them another time when I was looking for a job, and their "service" was abysmal. Really small-minded seat warmers putting in time for a pension. I now wish I had mentioned that in the interview.

    Interview Questions

    • Have you ever had a situation with a coworker that was negative, what happened, and how is your relationship with that person now?   1 Answer
See All 2 Interviews

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