Working at ePrize | Glassdoor

ePrize Overview

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Pleasant Ridge, MI
201 to 500 employees
HelloWorld
Unknown
Company - Private
Advertising & Marketing
$10 to $25 million (USD) per year
Unknown

ePrize Reviews

3.0
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Matt Wise
5 Ratings
  • "Great culture"

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    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at ePrize full-time

    Pros

    The culture is really fun

    Cons

    It can be catty at times

See All 60 Reviews

ePrize Interviews

Experience

Experience
57%
14%
29%

Getting an Interview

Getting an Interview
34%
33%
22%
11

Difficulty

2.7
Average

Difficulty

Hard
Average
Easy
  1. Helpful (2)  

    Software Engineer Interview

    Anonymous Interview Candidate
    No Offer
    Negative Experience

    Application

    I applied through an employee referral. I interviewed at ePrize.

    Interview

    I arrived 15 minutes early and waited in the lobby for the corporate recruiter. Once the recruiter was available, she took me back and gave me a brief tour of the main level of the facility. The started with a cursory overview of my general interests and career experience with a very nice team lead. That conversation lasted for approximately 30 minutes. Next, I spoke to an individual that the previous interviewer reported to. This conversation was a bit more of the same with the addition of some specific situational questions with respect to my career (e.g. tell me about a time when ...). My final interview was in a conference room (The Peach Pit, if I recall correctly) with two team leads. This portion of the interview was entirely technical and consisted of implementing code and architecture on a white board. My first challenge was to implement an algorithm for the popular interview question FizzBuzz. The second was to implement an array searching algorithm whereby you search an array for values when multiplied is equivalent to the given input. After implementing the second algorithm, I was asked to identify the Big O efficiency of my solution. After having identified this to be less than ideal, I was asked to take a moment and find a more efficient solution. After this exercise was completed, I was asked to model the classes, properties, and methods for two complete games; first Checkers and then Monopoly. Finally I was asked how I might architect these solutions with respect to persistence and server architecture (including specifics on amount of servlets, client code, etc). This last piece concluded my interview.

    The entire process was completed in approximately 2 hours. I found the first two individuals I spoke with friendly and inquisitive. Unfortunately, the technical part of the interview left a bit to be desired. I have had the opportunity to interview several candidates for positions at my current place of employment, and each time I interview a likely candidate, I always try to create an atmosphere of mutual respect and genuine interest during the process. It does not seem that this is the case for the engineers interviewed at this company. During the written portion of the interview, on several occasions, the interviewers were more interested in their phones and in engaging in conversation with each other, than my questions for clarification and the provided solutions. My advice would be that this is best left for outside of the interview process. It is both distracting and disrespectful.

    Interview Questions

    • What is the Big O algorithmic optimization efficiency of an implemented algorithm and how might you make it better?   Answer Question
See All 9 Interviews

ePrize Awards & Accolades

  • 101 Best and Brightest Companies to Work For in Southeast Michigan, 101 Best & Brightest Companies to Work For, 2008

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