AEON Corporation of Japan Reviews | Glassdoor

AEON Corporation of Japan Reviews

Updated December 11, 2017
141 reviews

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Pros
  • Aeon will arrange your apartment, visa and bank account, as well as giving you money to cover your flight costs (in 17 reviews)

  • You also get to meet a lot of different kinds of people (in 5 reviews)

Cons
  • Japanese staff have it much harder than foreign teachers (in 28 reviews)

  • Long hours, very few holidays off, very stressful time constraints (in 14 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (4)

    "Legit job that pays a living wage"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan full-time

    Pros

    You will get to live in Japan. You will have a reliable, full-time job that pays a living wage. You will have good health insurance. You will have endless opportunities to meet new people and experience new things. You will have your own apartment (mine had its own washing machine). This is a good way to live independently and become acclimated to the working world after college. Japan is a beautiful, clean place with extremely punctual trains and nice people. My standard of living in Japan was higher than it'll probably be ever again.

    Cons

    The hours are probably long. Mine weren't that long because I taught in the middle of nowhere. The downside of that is that there's nothing to do in the town. Japan can be extremely lonely, especially out in the middle of nowhere. After several months I became extremely depressed. I don't think that happens to everyone, but it definitely can happen. The lessons are kind of boring and repetitive for you, but they are largely already done for you. The textbooks are so sexist they are extremely cringeworthy. Work culture is extremely strict and taking a day off without very advanced notice or without being made to feel bad, is impossible.

    Advice to Management

    Don't make the Manager work so hard for such little pay! They work too hard


  2. "English Teacher Experience"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan full-time

    Pros

    Travel, great students, chance to live in another country

    Cons

    sales, pressure to perform, overwork, feel like an outsider at times

  3. Helpful (11)

    "stay away. 0 stars"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Doesn't Recommend

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan full-time

    Pros

    As a foreign teacher: the company takes about $500 out of your salary/mo whether you live in the middle of nowhere ($200) or in downtown Tokyo (probably around $1k), so you'll definitely have a tiny LeoPalace studio to stay in. Living in Japan.

    Cons

    The manager you get placed with will help you set up a phone if she/he feels like it (all of my coworkers at one location did not receive any help from the school or company). The manager will probably set you up with a local bank account, as opposed to a national one, so you have to carry all cash on you if you want to travel outside your region (didn't happen to me, but many of my friends at other locations, and coworkers). You don't get to choose your housing, even if you find a better deal, or somewhere with a better commute (AEON has a deal with LeoPalace to have rent control).

    If you're a hard worker, they will overwork you; and they will ignore you if you can't do a single thing and even the students hate you. AEON only cares about making money short term, so they won't take care of good teachers (all teachers are disposable), or good managers. You only get paid for 25 TEACHING HOURS, which doesn't include the office work, cleaning, teachers' meetings, business meetings, special lessons, interviews, trial lessons, and class preparation you must do. Overtime is inevitable. You are not paid overtime, unless it's overtime in "teaching hours". In all, work amounts to over 40 hours a week. Sometimes you don't have enough time for a bathroom or water break between classes, which can be stacked up 5 at a time (which means 5 hours straight of teaching + student interaction). Hour lunch breaks are 50 minutes, if you're lucky, as you're expected to stay and talk to students if they're waiting for class to begin and/or you must be back at least 10 minutes early to set up for your next class.

    The company makes a semblance of a superficial effort if there are any problems, and will never solve them. There is a 3 month "probation period" which is simply an excuse for the company to pay you less. No one will get fired no matter how terrible they are: so for foreign teachers that means paid year-long vacation, and time to study Japanese while you're on the clock (pro for them, con for anyone who has to work with them); for managers that means free reign to abuse employees. If all employees at one school threaten to leave if a manager doesn't, the company simply gives said manager a new school where she can cause 2 teachers to quit on her within 6 months, and another to leave suddenly without notice after a week of work. She will not get fired even if the students avoid her.

    If you need to go to the hospital, good luck, you're on your own -- even if it's an emergency. Even then, you'll be forced to work (that private lesson can't be rescheduled, especially if the manager doesn't feel like calling, even though it has the most flexible schedule). People will claim to have the flu to take paid days off, and if you don't have the flu the company won't consider you ill (even if your students are vocally concerned for your health). Despite advertising fun events and outings with students, it's on a manager-basis, and some will not let you interact with students outside of class at all. Bonuses, and salary increases are a joke. You always have to work on Saturdays, sometimes even on Sundays (or some schools you must work Saturday and Sunday), which means almost no social life outside of the company. That means your coworkers are your primary source of socialization, so if you can't stand them, you're out of luck. You may not even have another foreign teacher at your location.

    If you have any problems with your housing, management will not help you (even after 2 or more months of submitting a request, or asking if they have time to make a phone call to LeoPalace management); and if you do something about it yourself you will be lectured by higher management for going over your manger's head.

    Students are just money bags to them, and they don't care about retaining students, especially if said student can't afford their current package, and wants to pay less for a lower tier. The company will push as many extra study materials, and expensive classes as possible on students, but refuses to guarantee value. It's your obligation to push sales, and you never see a bonus, or acknowledgement for it (and, again, your salary only pays teaching time).

    Assuming you have a replacement before you leave, there is a 3 day overlap. During this time the new teacher takes your apartment, and you are put up in a hotel for 2 nights. If your manager is extra spiteful she/he will put you up in 2 separate hotels across town, and no way to move all of your belongings. Maybe higher management will suggest for you to take a taxi, and ask for the school manager to pretty please reimburse you; but they will refuse to let you book the room in the same hotel for both nights, because the manager already paid for the other hotel (even though she didn't) -- that is they won't theoretically bite the financial bullet on a cheap $60 hotel, because your manager enjoys playing games. They will pat you on the back for being a team player, being flexible, providing quality teaching to their standard, being a pleasant person students want to be around, and lots of business support (*cough*financial gain*cough*(which can be over 5 times your monthly salary some months)), then you will have to hound them for 3 months after your contract ended to get the letter of recommendation you're contractually obligated to receive on your last day of work.

    Advice to Management

    Fire the terrible managers with a track record for abusing teachers. If they have multiple teachers break contract because of them in a one year span, get rid of them. Have a better screening process for foreign teachers, and if they're absolutely terrible without any hope for improvement, fire them at the end of the probation period, or during training if they are so notably horrible, and universally difficult. If workers are good, do more to support them. Do not simply measure a manager's success by the money they make, especially if the teachers are doing all the work to sell contracts. Managers who cannot retain students, or teachers due to mistreatment, should not qualify for monetary bonuses. If a manager goes on vacation, they should not qualify for monetary bonuses made solely by teachers doing managerial sales during that time (at the very least, managers should be required to tell employees they are going on vacation during a counseling week, primary time for business sales, at least the day before they leave). Managers should be held accountable for showing up to work on time, and for the amount + duration of breaks they take. If they are regularly over an hour late to work, they should be penalized. If they do not do their job, they should be fired. If assistant managers consistently quit, or 3 are on rotation to show up once a month, fire the manager who harasses them. The company should ensure no additional managerial work is pushed onto the teaching staff due to the manager not doing his or her job. Have more regular feedback and survey opportunities for students. Make sure the managers see said feedback, understand it, and respond accordingly; if not, higher management needs to step in and take action. AEON should do its best to retain good teachers, and ensure a decent quality of life (which includes less than a 1.5 -- 2 hour commute for some Japanese teachers, and less hectic weekly schedules). Although it may be a cultural difference, feedback should be direct and provide solutions, especially for foreign teachers who lack cultural sensitivity/awareness (some do not understand that they are getting less classes because they are horrible, they see it as more down time to relax at work and play on their phones or chat, while their coworkers get more piled on).


  4. "Not Bad"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - English Teacher
    Former Employee - English Teacher
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Incredibly supportive staff, and the company made a point to make the staff feel included in most parts of the school.

    Cons

    Constant interference from the corporate offices.

    Advice to Management

    Let local staff be more autonomous.


  5. "Great company does recommend"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Teacher
    Former Employee - Teacher
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Great pay
    Awesome staff
    Great hours
    The people you meet, you will bond with them

    Cons

    None really, but maybe more flexibility

    Advice to Management

    Maybe a better pay thats about it


  6. Helpful (3)

    "If you want to get to Japan, be prepared to work for it"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - English As A Second Language Teacher
    Former Employee - English As A Second Language Teacher
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan (More than a year)

    Pros

    A well furnished apartment (note, not all apartment buildings will be brand new - I was lucky)
    Helpful coworkers
    Right near the Bullet train
    Pay was great, especially if you live in a small town.

    Cons

    You can be the only foreign teacher at your school.
    Long work hours, expected to work some Sundays.
    Little vacation time, You get the 3 major one-week breaks that ALL Japanese workers have. Traveling during those times is kinda crazy and busy.

    Advice to Management

    If you don't want your English teachers to burn out, give them more days off.


  7. Helpful (1)

    "review"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan full-time

    Pros

    they set up everything for you

    Cons

    terrible hours no room for advancement

  8. Helpful (5)

    "Freaking awesome but greatly depends on School"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - English Teacher
    Current Employee - English Teacher
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    I have been working at AEON Corporation of Japan full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    Let me just say this is the best experience, and the best choice I've made in my life!! I'm having a wonderful time in Japan.

    This is a great way to get started on living and teaching in Japan. Aeon has great staff support. I mean really, they take care of you. They set you up with a usually furnished apartment, they help you with almost everything to finally get you all situated in Japan. You go through some training which does help. Then they'll set you free to your school where you'll meet your new coworkers/managers who most likely are willing to help you out if you need it. Your coworkers can be one of the best things/pro during this experience.

    This brings me to my next point. The reason you see mixed reviews is because it greatly depends on your school. You may get a school with an awful manager, staff that can hardly speak English, or just bad work environment in general. Well, that can really take a toll on you and effect your happiness. Thankfully, that's in the minority but it does happen. I had an awesome school, in an awesome location(also another big factor). My manager was chill af.

    You'll teach and get to know your students. It can be a really rewarding and amazing experience. They are all usually very nice, cool, wonderful people. The students will definitely be a pro while here.

    Your training mates! Depends, but you guys could end up having a tight bond.

    Cons

    - The work hours. It'll feel like you're living for the weekends.
    - It's easy work but you're expected to do a lot in between classes and sometimes it can feel overwhelming. It also depends on how busy your school is. Some teachers have more hectic schedules.
    - counseling week/sales week (where you try to push products on your students..it's not so bad sometimes, but it's not so good).

    Advice to Management

    Can't think of any at the moment


  9. Helpful (1)

    "Not bad"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan full-time

    Pros

    It is a great place to start out in Japan. They help you with apartments, phones, and many other essentials that are very hard to do on your own when first arriving.

    Cons

    The first six months can be very rough with how sub-par the training is and how many classes you have to teach. after that it is not such a stressful job


  10. Helpful (2)

    "Great experience"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee

    Pros

    But I worked here in 1994. It was a terrific experience.

    Cons

    One thing that's important to understand, at least in Japan, is that once you get to the school, the managers don't explain what they want you to do. They expected us to copy them.

    Advice to Management

    So AEON's training needs to be tweaked to explain that cultural gap.


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