AEON Corporation of Japan Employee Reviews about "foreign teachers"

Updated Jan 17, 2021

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3.4
68%
Recommend to a Friend
Pros
  • "You'll get a furnished apartment, a bank account and all of the main paperwork will be done for you(in 33 reviews)

  • "Get valuable teaching experience(in 15 reviews)

Cons
  • "not many career advancement opportunities for foreign teachers(in 39 reviews)

  • "Japanese staff have tasks that they want you to do, but don’t always tell you so you do not know what to prepare or what to do(in 26 reviews)

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Reviews about "foreign teachers"

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  1. Helpful (6)

    "If you want to get to Japan, be prepared to work for it"

    4.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    English As A Second Language Teacher 
    Recommends
    Negative Outlook

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan for more than a year

    Pros

    A well furnished apartment (note, not all apartment buildings will be brand new - I was lucky) Helpful coworkers Right near the Bullet train Pay was great, especially if you live in a small town.

    Cons

    You can be the only foreign teacher at your school. Long work hours, expected to work some Sundays. Little vacation time, You get the 3 major one-week breaks that ALL Japanese workers have. Traveling during those times is kinda crazy and busy.

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  2. Helpful (2)

    "It All Depends On Your School"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Foreign English Teacher 
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Highest starting pay for foreign teachers besides JET, in my research at least. I had a great boss who spoke a good amount of English, but some people's bosses don't speak good English. Keep that in mind. At my school, we weren't expected to stay late, and we left shortly after closing. However, that is not the case everywhere. You get to meet new students from all different careers and ages. It's a great experience in a foreign country with a culture very different than in the west. Good introduction to a different work culture and a different way of thinking. The salary is pretty livable and you can save a good amount, granted you don't take trips every weekend.

    Cons

    There is little to no room for growth, unless you plan to become a trainer and spend your time training new employees at the training office. However, that takes a few years or longer. This is not a career. This is a good starting position to be a stepping stone for job opportunities in Japan. Your salary increases after every successful contract completion, but very very marginally . Everything else I say will be based on your school. It's not the same at all schools. At follow up training, a few months after teaching, you go back to the training center and do, you guessed it, more training. You get to talk with people from your original training group, and when I went back, the other teachers had vastly different managers, ways of working, and experiences than I did. If you don't like kids at all, this position is not for you. You work with babies through middle schoolers every day, multiple times a day. Not a bad thing, but it's hard to learn Japanese at this job. I could try to speak it with my coworkers during lunch and times when we weren't busy, but other than that, it's English at all times. I think it just makes it hard to adapt to life outside work when all you do is speak English at work.


  3. Helpful (1)

    "Do as you're told, question nothing."

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Contractor - Anonymous Contractor 
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at AEON Corporation of Japan

    Pros

    The salary is one of highest paid for foreign teachers at an Eikaiwa. The health, dental, and visual benefits are also top tier.

    Cons

    There's no HR department, which means any complaints that you have about living conditions, banking problems, or needing a translator for medical reasons is often met with rude responses or passive aggressive bullying. "Why can't you try yourself?", "You shouldn't trouble others so much." If you have a problem with management being too harsh, irresponsible, or any form of harassment (including sexual), the only people you can get assistance from are trainers at the Head Office. They often are too busy and, honestly, have no really pull to fix things. The management will take a revenge stance against you and make working at the school even worse. As far as having a future with the company, as a foreigner, there isn't one. The company keeps foreigners as teachers with little to no advancement. Some teachers have made it to high ranking positions but they had to stay as teachers for 10+ years. The company also tells it's foreign teachers they don't have to learn Japanese to live in Japan. This is very much a lie if the teacher doesn't live in a major city. The other Japanese Teachers at the school will grow tired of helping the foreign teacher as far as translating or reading mail.

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  4. Helpful (31)

    "stay away. 0 stars"

    1.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Doesn't Recommend

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan full-time

    Pros

    As a foreign teacher: the company takes about $500 out of your salary/mo whether you live in the middle of nowhere ($200) or in downtown Tokyo (probably around $1k), so you'll definitely have a tiny LeoPalace studio to stay in. Living in Japan.

    Cons

    The manager you get placed with will help you set up a phone if she/he feels like it (all of my coworkers at one location did not receive any help from the school or company). The manager will probably set you up with a local bank account, as opposed to a national one, so you have to carry all cash on you if you want to travel outside your region (didn't happen to me, but many of my friends at other locations, and coworkers). You don't get to choose your housing, even if you find a better deal, or somewhere with a better commute (AEON has a deal with LeoPalace to have rent control). If you're a hard worker, they will overwork you; and they will ignore you if you can't do a single thing and even the students hate you. AEON only cares about making money short term, so they won't take care of good teachers (all teachers are disposable), or good managers. You only get paid for 25 TEACHING HOURS, which doesn't include the office work, cleaning, teachers' meetings, business meetings, special lessons, interviews, trial lessons, and class preparation you must do. Overtime is inevitable. You are not paid overtime, unless it's overtime in "teaching hours". In all, work amounts to over 40 hours a week. Sometimes you don't have enough time for a bathroom or water break between classes, which can be stacked up 5 at a time (which means 5 hours straight of teaching + student interaction). Hour lunch breaks are 50 minutes, if you're lucky, as you're expected to stay and talk to students if they're waiting for class to begin and/or you must be back at least 10 minutes early to set up for your next class. The company makes a semblance of a superficial effort if there are any problems, and will never solve them. There is a 3 month "probation period" which is simply an excuse for the company to pay you less. No one will get fired no matter how terrible they are: so for foreign teachers that means paid year-long vacation, and time to study Japanese while you're on the clock (pro for them, con for anyone who has to work with them); for managers that means free reign to abuse employees. If all employees at one school threaten to leave if a manager doesn't, the company simply gives said manager a new school where she can cause 2 teachers to quit on her within 6 months, and another to leave suddenly without notice after a week of work. She will not get fired even if the students avoid her. If you need to go to the hospital, good luck, you're on your own -- even if it's an emergency. Even then, you'll be forced to work (that private lesson can't be rescheduled, especially if the manager doesn't feel like calling, even though it has the most flexible schedule). People will claim to have the flu to take paid days off, and if you don't have the flu the company won't consider you ill (even if your students are vocally concerned for your health). Despite advertising fun events and outings with students, it's on a manager-basis, and some will not let you interact with students outside of class at all. Bonuses, and salary increases are a joke. You always have to work on Saturdays, sometimes even on Sundays (or some schools you must work Saturday and Sunday), which means almost no social life outside of the company. That means your coworkers are your primary source of socialization, so if you can't stand them, you're out of luck. You may not even have another foreign teacher at your location. If you have any problems with your housing, management will not help you (even after 2 or more months of submitting a request, or asking if they have time to make a phone call to LeoPalace management); and if you do something about it yourself you will be lectured by higher management for going over your manger's head. Students are just money bags to them, and they don't care about retaining students, especially if said student can't afford their current package, and wants to pay less for a lower tier. The company will push as many extra study materials, and expensive classes as possible on students, but refuses to guarantee value. It's your obligation to push sales, and you never see a bonus, or acknowledgement for it (and, again, your salary only pays teaching time). Assuming you have a replacement before you leave, there is a 3 day overlap. During this time the new teacher takes your apartment, and you are put up in a hotel for 2 nights. If your manager is extra spiteful she/he will put you up in 2 separate hotels across town, and no way to move all of your belongings. Maybe higher management will suggest for you to take a taxi, and ask for the school manager to pretty please reimburse you; but they will refuse to let you book the room in the same hotel for both nights, because the manager already paid for the other hotel (even though she didn't) -- that is they won't theoretically bite the financial bullet on a cheap $60 hotel, because your manager enjoys playing games. They will pat you on the back for being a team player, being flexible, providing quality teaching to their standard, being a pleasant person students want to be around, and lots of business support (*cough*financial gain*cough*(which can be over 5 times your monthly salary some months)), then you will have to hound them for 3 months after your contract ended to get the letter of recommendation you're contractually obligated to receive on your last day of work.

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  5. Helpful (6)

    "Worked in a branch in Yokohama for 2 and a half years."

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
     

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan

    Pros

    When you first arrive they really take care of you. After training, they make sure you take the correct trains and have someone waiting for you at the other end. They also help you with setting up residence status, banks, and phone contracts. I honestly think its a great way to get to Japan. The students are really nice to talk to, and it's a great way to make connections. Compared to some other Eikaiwa teachers that I've talked to, you do get your own apartment without having to share anything. The branch schools are typically in good locations near stations with lots of other places around it to go to during lunch or before work.

    Cons

    It really is a typical Eikaiwa. Even though this company gives a bit more to their foreign teachers, they really do work you down to the bone. There is a LOT of politics in the company. Depending on your branch school, sometimes the Japanese staff doesn't care if you are a good teacher or not. They merely care about selling and not on the improvement the students are actually making. They will push you to sell in counseling sessions, even though a student may not need a material or already have a material that they didn't even finish. Depending on the staff, they don't really help you when you seriously need to seek medical attention (and don't have the language skills to communicate in Japanese). Also, the workload is not distributed evenly at all. If you have a REALLY strong relationship with the Japanese head teacher or whoever is in charge, you basically made it an easy ride for you the whole time you are there. Also, God forbid that you get seriously ill and have a doctors note to not work for a week or even a couple of days. Yes, you get the time off, but it will be a living hell when you get back (again depending on staff). They will purposely pile everything on you even if it is not your regular classes or other teachers are not busy for the day. And by the way did I mention there's a lot of politics in the company. No place to grow. Working here for one and a half year tops is good. Move on after that. Also, I will admit that at least the branch school I was working at was a bit sexist (which wasn't too big of a surprise do to the culture). Men will not have as much of a hard time as women would.

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  6. Helpful (4)

    "Teacher"

    4.0
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee 
    Recommends

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan full-time

    Pros

    A great opportunity to live and work in Japan and learn a lot about how to work a classroom.

    Cons

    After several years there is limited advancement for foreign teachers through the organization, though they do exist.

  7. Helpful (4)

    "English Instructor"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Teacher 
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Some of the best pay for an English conversation school in Japan. The students are usually great, and the lesson structure is pre planned, so it's not difficult to learn how to teach.

    Cons

    Each school is different. At some schools foreign teachers have very little responsibilities while at others you're there long hours and it can be very stressful.

  8. Helpful (5)

    "A good way to go abroad for a couple of years."

    3.0
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - ESL Teacher 
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Getting to know the students and working with a range of levels is great. If you are just out of college or if you are looking for a way to teach abroad with little or no experience, this company is a good way to start as they will hire and train you. You have the opportunity to teach adults only or adults and children. Kids lessons can break up the monotony of teaching the same adults lessons repeatedly. Three weeks of vacation per year during Japanese national holidays, although traveling can be expensive because everyone is traveling during the same time. If you are recruited outside of Japan, the company has a single apartment for you, so you don't have to worry about key money. They also subsidize your apartment over a certain amount, helpful if you live in a big city.

    Cons

    Retail education at its finest. A lot of pressure is put on meeting the financial goals of the school. The teachers are expected to be salespeople too, and at times it feels as though you are recommending classes/materials just to fulfill that month's quota. The trust between teachers and students can suffer because of this. The lessons are very structured and don't allow the teacher much room to improvise or adjust the lessons to students' needs. The new digital format allows little time for teacher interaction with students. There's not much opportunity for a foreign teacher to move up. It's a Japanese company so there are only so many career opportunities for foreigners. Unlike some other language schools abroad, AEON does not pay your way to or from the country. There is a high turnover rate for foreign teachers. Most just want to live abroad for a couple of years or, they want to live in Japan but use this company as a starting point.

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  9. Helpful (3)

    "It can be really great or it can be really bad depending on who your coworkers are."

    2.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - English Instructor 
    Doesn't Recommend

    I worked at AEON Corporation of Japan full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    The students are usually prepared and excited to learn. Interacting with them was definitely the best part of the job. They pay is decent and you'll be able to have fun on your time off. If you have nice coworkers and the school is doing well monetarily you'll probably have fun. Class load also really depends on where you are as well. You could be teaching 20 classes a week or 30.

    Cons

    Plan to spend significant time during lunch as well as before and after work working. It can get very busy on Saturday so don't expect time to breath. If your coworkers try to overwork you, or if the school is doing badly, or if your school is short staffed(or just has bad staff), it will be very stressful. AEON is a business and spends much more effort retaining students than it does trying to provide workers with a good experience. They know most foreign teachers will leave anyway.

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  10. "Not bad"

    3.0
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Diversity & Inclusion
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - English Instructor in Tokyo
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook

    I have been working at AEON Corporation of Japan full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    Students are awesome They set you up well so it's good for your first job in Japan

    Cons

    There is not much career growth for foreign teachers

Viewing 1 - 10 of 43 English Reviews

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