AT&T Application developer associate Reviews | Glassdoor

AT&T application developer associate Reviews

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application developer associate

2.6
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AT&T Chairman and CEO Randall L. Stephenson
Randall L. Stephenson
5 Ratings

Employee Reviews

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Pros
  • "Pay and benefits are better than I’ve ever dreamed imaginable" (in 890 reviews)

  • "There is a proper work life balance" (in 503 reviews)

Cons
  • "Poor work life balance if you have a family due to American working hours" (in 1082 reviews)

  • "very long hours; no work-life balance" (in 312 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (2)

    "Great People, Growth Opportunities, and Values"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Associate Applications Developer in Dallas, TX
    Current Employee - Associate Applications Developer in Dallas, TX
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at AT&T full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    I work in ATO (AT&T Technology Operations) under Technology Development. Our organization really cares about growing its employees skills. For example, as a way to transform employee's skills, they offer Udacity's nanodegrees, Masters of Data Science from Notre Dame, and a Masters of Computer Science from Georgia Tech all for free. Aside from that, our company also reimburses employees up to a certain amount if we want to get a graduate degree such as an MBA. John Donovan is doing an incredible job leading our workforce's skills transformation and making sure we can thrive in this hyper-competitive environment. AT&T values and invests in its employees for the long term. AT&T also hosts great conferences like the Employee Resource Conference each year. It's through conferences like that where all of us regardless of level or experience can learn from our company's smartest minds and hearts. We're better together. That's why even though I'm a Computer Science major from a Top 10 Computer Science program in the nation, a software engineer at AT&T, and a female minority, I choose to work at AT&T, and I foresee myself staying here as long as what I value continues - the growth opportunities, the great people, the company values.

    Cons

    People assume if I work for AT&T, I sell phones. We do a lot more than cellphones (Connectivity in cars, DirecTV, B2B, B2C, ERGs).

    Advice to Management

    Don't lose what makes our company great - continue to invest in our people through growth opportunities, integrity in the company's values, and great people.


  2. Helpful (2)

    "A haven for the mediocre, frustrating for the ambitious"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Associate Applications Developer
    Current Employee - Associate Applications Developer
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at AT&T full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    The Technology Development program is a decent place to start if you're fresh out of college and have little experience in the professional world. While working within the Technology Development program, you can transition to different clients fairly easily, gaining exposure to different technologies.

    Cons

    As the title suggests, if you don't intend on working hard or accomplishing much professionally, then AT&T is ideal for you. The ambitious and hard-working need not apply.

    - Raises are terrible (~2% per year) and the starting salary is uncompetitive, especially if you're a developer. Even if you're a developer from a great school, you'll get paid roughly the same amount as non-technical people from inferior schools. No matter how hard you work, no matter what you do to set yourself apart, your raises are mostly determined by your seniority in the company.

    - AT&T oozes with cheapness. As a developer, you'll receive a cheap Windows machine. My office space is dull, uninspiring and tawdry, with hardly any perks or amenities whatsoever.

    - The TDP program is too long. 18 months is far too long to babysit people. Realistically, you'll only get a minor pay and title bump after those 18 months are up.

    - Sometimes you go without work for long stretches of time. It is simply unbelievable that developers can sit around with nothing to do.

    Advice to Management

    Reward individuals based off their merit and hard work. Paying your best up-and-coming employees the same amount as your most mediocre employees inevitably results in everyone leaving the company except for those too untalented and unmotivated to work elsewhere.

    Co-located employees should be put on the same project. Employees should be encouraged to work collaboratively and learn strong interpersonal skills. Too many developers sit off in their own corners working on a project where absolutely everyone else is remote.

  3. Helpful (1)

    "Leaves a lot to be desired."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Associate Applications Developer in San Ramon, CA
    Former Employee - Associate Applications Developer in San Ramon, CA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at AT&T full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    - Not a lot of pressure to perform at a high level, easy to coast by
    - You are allowed to work on side projects and participate in hackathons
    - TDP program puts you with other young employees
    - Opportunity to work remote for certain circumstances

    Cons

    - Pay is extremely below market rate. AT&T is not going after top talent. This role is best suited as a proving ground for candidates who weren't qualified for more talented dev companies
    - Not really a development focused company. You need to request admin rights to download anything, you can't choose your machine, no access to developer licenses. Projects aren't really innovative, AngularJS 1.5 is the hottest thing in TDP
    - Not really millennial friendly. I hear Dallas is though

    Advice to Management

    Stop attempting to save money at every corner and invest in your younger employees. Focusing on training your older employees will only get you so far


  4. Helpful (4)

    "Okay first job out of college, but leaves a lot to be desired"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Associate Applications Developer in Saint Louis, MO
    Former Employee - Associate Applications Developer in Saint Louis, MO
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at AT&T full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    Made some really good friends. It helped get my foot in the door in the software industry.

    Left a lot to be desired, which motivated me to learn a lot in my free time outside of work.

    Flexible-ish hours. It was very easy to schedule appointments and flex a few hours through out the week. I've recently heard this has been limited to 15 minutes total for brand new employees now, but I'm not 100% sure on that.

    Used to be really easy to work from home during bad weather conditions. Not sure if that will still be true for new hires.

    Cons

    Very little mentorship from senior employees. They are either too busy with redundant meetings or don't have enough knowledge to actually help mentor.

    Too many exempt employees work crazy hours (60+). For entry and junior level positions, you're often capped at 40 hours per week (which is an excellent pro). This also discourages folks from staying long at the company because people don't like working 60+ hours.

    Basically zero recognition for hard work. They do give decent bonuses for hard work, but the low salary and benefits don't make up for it.

    Most higher ranked people are only that level because they've stayed so many years at the company; it's not skill-based.

    It's very easy for an entry level employee with a little bit of initiative to become a "Subject Matter Expert (SME)" or to even act as a technical team lead just because so much of the senior staff is outdated/unmotivated.

    Leadership doesn't trust employees and employees don't trust leadership.

    Advice to Management

    Focus on compensating your best talent. The best people have been leaving and will continue to. It's claimed AT&T is paying market rate, but that's not true for the even slightly above average programmers. The better folks can easily leave for a 50%+ raise somewhere else (same city and all).

    Stop the "brainwashing" tactics. Trying to convince your employees they're the "smartest" and "best of the best" doesn't help employees improve. It just causes underperforming folks to have large egos.

    Hiring standards need to be increased a lot. Too many programmers were hired with little knowledge of any programming. Seems like a lot of them were hired because they were related to higher-ups.

    If a team is struggling to meet deadlines, hiring brand new kids out of college without any programming knowledge won't help a bit.

    Get rid of/reduce the leadership hierarchy. It causes so many communication issues and pointless titles. Also, stop focusing so much on titles. Every time some little new technology comes out, it seems like middle management spends months thinking of new titles. Titles aren't important, compensation is.

    Actually fire underperforming people. It may be considered expensive to fire underperforming people, but it's even more costly to lose your best talent due to wanting motivated peers.


  5. Helpful (7)

    "TDP - Emerging Technologies"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Associate Applications Developer in Dallas, TX
    Former Employee - Associate Applications Developer in Dallas, TX
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at AT&T full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    The only good thing about the TDP program is that I got to make great friends. You're capped at working 40 hours a week so that helps with work/life balance. The 50% discount on AT&T services is great. Great place to work if you want to have a steady salary and don't care about learning much.

    Cons

    There is nothing "Emerging" about the program. This is probably the worst place for a CS major to learn something. You work on outdated technologies with remote teams. All the collaboration is virtual with team members across the globe. The hiring standards are way too low. The good programmers that you work with are generally contractors from Accenture or some other consulting firm. The way benefits work is laughable. A person making PowerPoint presentations and a person developing good code make the same mediocre salary. The management stresses that benefits are on par with other top tech companies which is not true at all. A new computer science grad could easily be making 20-30% more in the same city. They stress a lot on the use of Agile methodologies although you will most likely never get a chance to work with it. Employees are led to believe that they are the best of the best which is leaving a false sense of pride among them. Nothing is based on merit. Management is very biased towards ass-licking employees. And yeah, the worst of all, appearance has precedence over intellect and merit which is infuriating.

    Advice to Management

    Improve hiring standards. There is way too much deadwood is the organization. Hiring 50 people but not having work for 45 of them is not how things are going to get better. Engineers are making spreadsheets and presentations, programmers are sitting idle with little to no work at times. This is why there are budget issues within the company. The supply is way more than the demand. Rather than hiring in bulk, make sure the present employees are utilized to their full potential and are compensated appropriately.


  6. Helpful (3)

    "Good starting point for your career."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Applications Developer - Associate in Atlanta, GA
    Current Employee - Applications Developer - Associate in Atlanta, GA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at AT&T full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    The Company is strong and your job is secure and management cares about the direction of the company. Many training opportunities. A sense of caring from the company.

    Cons

    The pay is pretty low for the career field. There doesn't seem much serious effort to retain talent. Good developers continue to leave and get 20-30% raises at other companies. Employees are considered an expense instead of an asset at times.

    Advice to Management

    In addition to the obvious things like better pay and bonuses. Don't forget about the little things like free plastic forks and a free gym. Instead of making your employees pay for the company gym and bring their own forks. (Just some examples)


  7. Helpful (1)

    "MaTrex Program - Not As Advertised!"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Associate Applications Developer - MaTrex in Atlanta, GA
    Former Employee - Associate Applications Developer - MaTrex in Atlanta, GA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at AT&T full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    The coworkers were generally very easy to work with - positive and helpful. The benefits were good, especially the discounts on AT&T services. Pay was decent for fresh college grads.

    Cons

    The program promised rotational assignments, but on day one we were told your position was locked in - no rotation or moving teams. Micromanaged to the highest degree. Often forced to attend "employee development" meetings (i.e. discussions on nutrition or management training) over finishing actually assignments. Little to no ability to work overtime even when the needs of the job required it. Work seemed undervalued compared to helping the direct manager be visible to upper management. You have two supervisors - one for your work and one for MaTrex. They often disagreed on priorities (finishing the actual versus improvements on soft skills) and the employee was stuck in the middle. Little possibility for professional advancement.

    Advice to Management

    Let the employees focus more on project completion and working with their work supervisors. Let the employee decide whether they need to meet a deadline or attend a meeting on nutrition.