Amazon Manager Finance Reviews | Glassdoor

Amazon Finance Manager Reviews

Updated Sep 29, 2019

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3.8
StarStarStarStarStar
Rating TrendsRating Trends
68%
Recommend to a Friend
93%
Approve of CEO
Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos
Jeff Bezos
48 Ratings
  1. "Excellent comp and interesting work"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Finance Manager in Columbia, SC
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Amazon full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    I love the people I work with and for in Operations Finance. They elevate my work and challenge me to learn new things daily.

    Cons

    The ambiguous environment isn't for everyone. With the right attitude, it can be fun. We have room to fail and learn. But that kind of things gets to some people.

    Amazon2019-05-20
  2. "Like Amazon"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Finance Manager 

    I have been working at Amazon full-time

    Pros

    Good visibility to senior management

    Cons

    Lots of work - even during weekends

    Advice to Management

    None

    Amazon2019-09-10
  3. Helpful (1)

    "Senior Finance Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    Current Employee - Senior Finance Manager in Seattle, WA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Amazon full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    Stock price appreciation has gone up significantly if you started before 2015

    Cons

    Long hours, politics, extremely tough process getting promoted to Director (L8)

    Amazon2019-09-02
  4. "Continuous high octane boot camp"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Finance Manager in Seattle, WA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Amazon full-time for more than 5 years

    Pros

    Interesting business problems/opportunities, great co-workers, modern tools/processes/methods.

    Cons

    Non-existent work-life balance in some teams.

    Amazon2019-08-06
  5. "great company, but more politics"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Finance Manager in Seattle, WA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Amazon full-time for more than 8 years

    Pros

    it's a company with a lot of innovations

    Cons

    the cultrure changed in the past few years with more and more office politics

    Amazon2019-07-24
  6. "Top Tier Talent"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Finance Manager in Seattle, WA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Amazon full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Growth, strong sense of ownership, unlimited potential, wide range of opportunities, healthy challenges and problems to solve, meritocracy.

    Cons

    Red tape, difficult getting corporate (tax, accounting, legal) decisions, lacks work life balance (but steps are being taken to improve).

    Advice to Management

    With growth comes responsibility, much is changing with centralized processes and control which is part of a company this size. We need to balance the entrepreneurial spirit, two-way door decisions with the right controls.

    Amazon2019-06-10
  7. Helpful (4)

    "Finance is proud of the 2015 NYT article and hasn't changed much"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Finance Manager in Seattle, WA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Amazon full-time for more than 3 years

    Pros

    The business teams you work with are talented, motivated, and accomplish amazing things. You can rotate out of finance and onto a business team.

    Cons

    Finance consistently promotes managers with the lowers connections (employees satisfaction survey) scores. It makes the "Making Finance Great" initiative and asking connections questions seem irrelevant. Process improvement and automation is discussed but not valued. My team created some great automation which made planning easier. I was told it didn't appear that my team suffered during planning, and... people should be working until 7 or later during planning. Re-prioritization happens every couple of days. It's really code for incremental work that must get done and deadlines on the original work don't move. The attitude is to suck it up and work 12+ hours multiple times a week all while calling it work/life harmony.

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    Advice to Management

    Stop promoting bad managers. People will just leave the team or leave the company.

    Amazon2019-05-01
  8. Helpful (258)

    "Great place to learn, churn n burn culture in finance"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Finance Manager in Seattle, WA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Amazon full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    - super smart people, the best of the best from schools - if you get hired here, you will be hirable anywhere, recruiting process is tough - the pay is above average, probably 1.5 times elsewhere (but the expected results are 150% of elsewhere too) - lots of opportunities to work on new, innovative projects - cool SLU campus, lots of options for food and drinks after work

    Cons

    - frugality is taken to the extreme, only 2 weeks vacation, parking takes a year or more to get, zero perks (not even free Prime), no fitness allowance, poor 401k - your peers will stab you in the back, your manager will blame you for their errors, you can't trust anyone - people who throw others under the bus and take credit for other people's work get promoted - expectations 60 -70 hours a week, some teams... expect Sunday to be an "in the office day", headcount never gets filled, teams are always short a few people but the work keeps piling on.

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    Advice to Management

    The culture and reputation of amazon will never change unless you want it to and set the tone from the top. Try using some customer obsession with employees- as management, employees are YOUR customers. Making great products or margins is fine, but if you have a reputation/brand for treating people awful, then are you really a success? Also, there is visible lack of women or minorities in any leadership role... compared to pretty much every other large company in Seattle. Seems like you have to try really hard in a city as diverse as this to be so undiverse.

    Show More
    Amazon2017-03-29
  9. Helpful (6)

    "A company with a lot to offer, but go in with eyes wide open."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Manager Finance in Seattle, WA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Amazon full-time for more than a year

    Pros

    Amazon is a company where the diversity of businesses, teams, and roles within those teams allows you to explore opportunities in almost anything you can think up. You are encouraged to leverage your areas of strength to contribute, and you really have the opportunity to manage your career, but you are responsible for managing your career... nobody is going to do that for you. Everyone I've engaged with has been... great in helping me to ramp, but I'm responsible for doing my homework ahead of time and engaging people to answer questions. This isn't a company where someone is going to walk up to you and say, how can I help you, but if you initiate, they will be responsive. My caveat to that is that your manager does have a responsibility to help you to ramp, and I've experienced that to varying degrees in the roles I've taken. Some managers are much better at the "develop the best" portion of that leadership principle than others. No matter the level, I've found that you are made to feel like you make a difference... because you do. It doesn't feel like you're part of a big machine even though you're one of many, many employees. Often I've been in meetings where the conversation can get heated, very strong points of view are shared, and it's very contained to that meeting or that conversation. People value differing points of view as long as they're substantive or backed by some rationale, in other words, don't talk just to talk... it won' t win you any points. The caliber of individuals I've had the opportunity to work with is mind-blowing. You really do feel like you're working with the best of the best. I love that the Leadership Principles are things we live and breathe every day at every level and not just some abstract or meaningless charters. These are principles we are expected to use to measure ourselves and the way we look at the performance of others. I also believe in the senior leadership of the organization, Jeff and his S-Team.

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    Cons

    Some managers aren't great at developing people, and it is harmful to the individual especially when they're new. The depth and consistency with which performance feedback is delivered varies dramatically from team to team, and that's something that needs to be worked on. It varies from team to team, but we talk a lot at the company about work-life harmony, but sometimes I feel like leadership and managers are... talking out of both sides of their mouth. It is expected that you ruthlessly prioritize so this company doesn't eat you alive, and that's with any company that is operating at the scale of Amazon. There is always more work to do and it's the responsibility of the employee to prioritize and to align on that prioritization with their management. It's also understandable that there are ebbs and flows, some times you're working all night when it's really busy but that is supposed to be offset with times which are lighter. I think leadership doesn't do a great job of listening sometimes when an employee says, "stop," it's too much. I've seen it happen where there's always one more and one more and one more thing to do, and management has said "well it all needs to get done but it will get lighter when...", and that "when" doesn't come. People, particularly people that are new or more junior, I've seen get worried that a "no" will be viewed as "I will hurt my chances of promotion" or "I will create a negative perception or hurt a relationship with my partners/customers." Amazon is not a company where the word "promotion" is well-received from my experience. Advancement can mean increase in scope or a new opportunity, but the "path to promotion" is too abstract in many areas. We have leveling guidelines to help you measure your performance and what the expectations are at the other levels but I've found that many mangers aren't great about aligning your strengths and areas of opportunity to those in a way that indicates when, if, or how you may be ready for promotion. It is a flat organization, and everyone I know has leveled down in terms of title to come work here, and that's okay, but promotion should not be made to feel like it's a taboo or bad word. You don't get promoted into a role here (i.e. if you're a manager, you don't go from Manager to Sr. Manager just by applying to a Sr. Manager role), you do well at your level and either 1. Get promoted in your role and then are expected to rotate into a role at that new level 2. have a current role that can be scoped at a higher level and then they level you up in your role and you can stay in that role 3. Apply to a higher level scoped role (1 level higher max) and are expected to perform at that higher level for x months and then get promoted. The con of that is that it varies from organization to organization within the company and sometimes from team to team on how that works and the transparency around that is not great at all. Sometimes people say you can't get a promotion unless there is a role of that same level open in that organization or the team, in other teams that's not the case. It's super confusing. The upside is that once you are up for promotion, the process is really good from my POV because it's not based on one person's experience. At a high level the concept is that a document is put together where your manager puts you up for promotion and you also have feedback from your partners supporting that promotion.

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    Advice to Management

    Create more transparency around the promotion process and the development of employees to get them ready for promotion. Don't make them feel like it's a taboo topic. If a milestone for an individual is to get promoted, we understand promotion is not the only thing, but it is a thing, so have the conversation... help us, and be clear about what it takes to get there with, to whatever degree possible, tactical,... tangible achievements that help to support that. Be better about enforcing work-life harmony. You work actively on hiring and developing more women and diverse candidates/employees. You've focused a lot on hiring and retention, but I'm not clear on how we're being helped as existing employees on the promotion portion of that objective and what our KPIs are. Promote more from within. You've hired the best... promotion is one of several measures of development, so promote.

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    Amazon2019-01-07
  10. "Senior Finance Manager"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Compensation and Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Finance Manager in Seattle, WA
    Recommends
    Positive Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I have been working at Amazon full-time for more than 10 years

    Pros

    You can still get 3 people in a room and make a decision to try something. that's pretty cool.

    Cons

    poor performers used to get weeded out quickly, sometimes they last too long now

    Advice to Management

    as we have grown it's hard to keep the bar high - we need to stay vigilant

    Amazon2018-12-10
Found 67 reviews