Analysis Group Reviews in Boston, MA | Glassdoor

Analysis Group Boston Reviews

Updated May 24, 2017
68 reviews

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Boston, MA Area

4.1
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Analysis Group President & CEO Martha S. Samuelson
Martha S. Samuelson
44 Ratings

68 Employee Reviews

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Pros
Cons
  • Work-life balance is tough but it comes with the territory (in 37 reviews)

  • Long hours, lack of advancement (in 23 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (6)

    "Econ consulting meat grinder; not as advertised"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Analysis Group full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    -Low expectations. If you are technically skilled, you will stand out here. There aren't a lot of econometric heavyweights at AG. Writing skills also help.
    -Genuinely friendly staff. Everyone is willing to try to make you feel welcome.
    -Nice location in downtown Boston.

    Cons

    -Exceptionally boring casework. Little to no skill in microeconomics or econometrics required. Cookie-cutter, meat-grinder analysis.
    -Poor ethics. I was asked on several occasions to use inappropriate econometric methods to advance a position that was favorable to clients. This sounds innocuous, but in this industry, advocacy is not acceptable.
    -Boston-centric. Very small firm presence outside of New England. Many offices but all the staff is in Beantown.
    -Limited accountability. AG has a lot of lifers. Talent is not rewarded and failure is not punished.

    Advice to Management

    -Listen to your analysts. They don't lie.


  2. Helpful (15)

    "Frat House or Professional Company?"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I worked at Analysis Group full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    I had to give one star because they would not allow me to leave zero stars. They are very good at selling the Kool-Aid and getting you to drink it at first.

    Cons

    From what I experienced, this company was like a college frat house. Constant rumors and behind the back talking, staff sleeping with each other, superiors sleeping with their subordinates (even married ones!). The annual company ski trip was seriously like being at a drunken frat party and was the last straw for me. Superiors having drinking contests with subordinates? I enjoy fraternizing with coworkers but this crosses the line into extremely unprofessional and honestly, it is dangerous. I had never experienced anything like this before.

    Advice to Management

    Stop throwing lavish events and pay attention to your employees before you have to use all of that party/ski trip money on lawsuits. I had heard rumors of this when I met with different recruiting agencies but dismissed it as gossip. Boy was I wrong. Its nice to have a job now where I don't have to worry about getting crabs from the toilet seats.


  3. Helpful (10)

    "My review"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Consultant in Boston, MA
    Current Employee - Consultant in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook

    I have been working at Analysis Group full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    No cubes or shared offices and the vacation time is nice if you are able to use it. I'm get to leave in the summer for grad school.

    Cons

    Too much middle management with not enough people to do the work means junior people are super overworked all the time. Poorly managed by top notch ego and cluelessness. People at top have no idea how to run business and staff teams effectively, leading "the masses" to figure it all out alone. Hard to get time with your manager to walk through projects so everything takes long to do. And the re do. Firm seems to have invisible rules that apply only when needed and only for certain people.It is impossible to play a game you don't know the rules for! Lack of clear or defined biz strategy or goals. feels very classist. Firm looks other way at problems. Two colleagues went to human resources with issues to address about people at the company who were pretty senior & both surprisingly
    "Decided to leave" soon after. Not a good cover up and awful to see people go through, when firm claims to have such a caring culture. Some great people don't get me wrong among the leaders and principals but it's not a company I would want to work for long term from some of the things I've seen and friends have dealt with and the total lack of interest in employees.


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  5. Helpful (27)

    "For those reading these reviews..."

    Star Star Star Star Star
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Current Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Analysis Group full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    ...you *do* realize that anything above 2 stars is a review written by either a partner who is part of the culture perpetuating their problems or else by a current employee who feels their job is on the line if they don't say something positive, right?

    Cons

    You probably don't want to work for a company that lives and dies by Glassdoor reviews, to the point of writing fake ones to get a better rating, but does nothing to address the actual issues.

    Advice to Management

    Why bother giving "advice to management" - it would fall on the deafest of ears. They literally think they can do no wrong, which is mind boggling when you consider just how many former employees could sue the pants off of you for a myriad of issues.


  6. "Toxic culture"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Former Employee - Anonymous Employee in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Analysis Group full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Very interesting and intellectually stimulating work for those who love data analysis; great stylish offices and a variety of premium snacks and drinks; no traveling needed; some genuine and nice colleagues; commitment to develop analysts and get them into grad school (most analysts though escape as soon as they find an exit option usually within 1 year)

    Cons

    So many cons that generate the toxic culture at the firm

    1. Very limited opportunities to advance and grow at the firm which generate intense competition and "throw people under the bus" strategies among the employees who join the firm with advanced degrees. People are literally willing to "kill people" in order to make themselves look good in front of the partners. Kissing-ass of the partners is the common rule in order to get promoted and one has to be kissing-ass non-stop in order to make progress (!)
    As a result, the turnover rate among associates and managers is very high. Those who succeed here are abrasive and passive aggressive towards their peers, and constantly kissing-ass towards the senior management.
    2. Economic consulting is a very niche business and the exit options are extremely limited and mediocre, typically only data analytics positions.
    3. The level of politics behind the scenes is sky-high...
    4. The CEO is friendly and nice but very passive...

    If you are someone who would want to stay here in the long term, does his job, does not antagonize anyone and doesn't care about advancement and the culture, you might be fine - after all the compensation and benefits are good and people who actually do the job are needed.

    Advice to Management

    Much has to be done in order to retain top talent and prevent the firm from imploding.


  7. Helpful (3)

    "Smart and motivated people but claim of good work/life balance is misleading"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Senior Analyst in Boston, MA
    Current Employee - Senior Analyst in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Negative Outlook
    Disapproves of CEO

    I have been working at Analysis Group full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Everyone at AG is incredibly smart and motivated. Within your first year, you gain tons of technical skills. A lot exposure to interesting case work.

    Cons

    Case work over time becomes monotonous and your work becomes more about formatting exhibits. Case managers who do not know how to manage can make your experience a nightmare. Misleading claims about good work/life balance (I would not say working 60-80 hours a week as having good work/life balance) as you're constantly on call. Pay is on the lower end considering the long hours.

    Advice to Management

    Managers need to learn how to manage.


  8. Helpful (6)

    "not for a career builder"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Anonymous in Boston, MA
    Current Employee - Anonymous in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Analysis Group full-time (More than a year)

    Pros

    For logistics, the offices are in major cities, which is a plus. The office decor is nice. Most offices have a casual dress policy.

    For personnel, it's a mix of good, bad, and I-can't-believe-they-are-still-employed. Some senior people (mostly select Vice Presidents, a few Managing Principals) are smart and care about your career path. Most others do not. Much of the administrative team (non economists) are nice and helpful when you need them (junior people will not really have much interaction though). But I get the sense they are unappreciated and probably not paid well for what they put up with.

    For the work, there is a chance to work on some really cool cases and projects, and with some great people, but those are small pockets of enjoyment in the larger scheme. The review process is excruciating and ineffective. It doesn't really matter what reviewers say about you, especially your peers. Just partners.

    Cons

    Employees are kept very unclear about future of company, leadership decisions, and how partners become partners. They seem to have hired a lot of new people over the two years I have worked here so far, but a lot of people are leaving too, not just for school. There is a lot of claim about it being a happy, collegial place, but it really isn't. You make friends and deal with nightmare partners, but it's not as supportive and special as they claimed during recruitment and interviews. I feel a little duped accepting the job I'm in because it hasn't been what I expected and was told while interviewing. IF you don't want to develop a real career then work here. I have encountered a lot of people who are very nasty and mean; for a semi diverse place, some pretty non PC things take place. You hear a lot of rumors about employee lawsuits against the company. I think they have grown too big too fast and lost most of what maybe used to make the place unique and special (before my time though ; I keep hearing about how good it used to be). I had high hopes to build a lasting career here, but no longer want to.

    Advice to Management

    Rarely can companies keep a fun and special culture if nothing is done to preserve it. This is something you've seemed to fail at. If it matters to you, fix it. If not, then you will hemorrhage good people who can get paid more and have more interesting work and a true balance between work and home elsewhere.


  9. Helpful (15)

    "Associate"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Associate in Boston, MA
    Current Employee - Associate in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Competitive pay, very smart people, great office

    Cons

    terrible work life balance, passive-aggressive culture, "large company acting like a small company" syndrome makes it hard to succeed


  10. Helpful (20)

    "Boston Analyst Role - Be Warned"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Analyst in Boston, MA
    Former Employee - Senior Analyst in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Positive Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I worked at Analysis Group full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    -The analyst class: Great group of people with whom you will become true friends. The ability to graduate college and start work with a class of 30 people your own age helps make the post-college transition easier. The IM sports teams, analyst parties, happy hours, etc help create a strong social bond among the class. Even after having left, I still consider my old co-workers true friends. Your colleagues will be intellectually interested and interesting people to learn from.

    -The technical training classes: compared to a management consulting firm, you will walk away with hard skills in SAS, STATA, VBA, and R. While these training programs may be annoying at the time, they do serve a purpose and you will take these skills with you to future jobs

    Cons

    -The failure of the internal labor market: You do not get to choose the cases you get to work on. Rather you are assigned a random case on day 1 and then you accrue experience in that given area. Since there is no case coordinator, as an analyst you basically get on a case by knowing the case team leader (ideally b/c you worked for them in the past). Therefore, unknowingly you get sucked into a vortex of path dependency (i don't want to do case type x, but this is what i have experience with and these are the only managers that want to work with me). It's hard to laterally move. For example, the manager of the energy practice when thinking of which analyst they want to work with will generally pick the analyst with the most energy experience. It's a catch-22

    -The intellectual boredom of the work: recognize that the majority of the work is writing SAS code that will ultimately allow you to produce tables, charts, and graphs. There is no big picture: you are far far down in the most minute details. Given the nature of the work (litigation), everything needs to be error proof. Every spreadsheet and line of code needs to be audited (double checked by somebody else) and sometimes even replicated. This was brutal for somebody like me that cares about the conclusion and doesn't care as much about the 17 different assumptions (of varying legitimacy) we made. At the end of the day, you are answering questions that are inherently not knowable. Analysis Group writes a 100 page report calculating damages at 75M, Brattle says 1B and the lawyers settle out of court for 400M. Big whoop.

    -Analysts don't often get beyond the number crunching. Less client exposure than at a strategy consulting firm, less opportunity to lead meetings, less opportunity to see the bizdev/ mkting side of the business. I felt like friends at BCG for example owned more of the work than an analyst at AG did. Also, if you have any interest in learning more about the business side of things, this is the wrong job for you.

    -Hourly Billing: it is not fun, enough said. there is a reason why lawyers all say that hourly billing is the worse part of their job. AG calculates a utilization rate for each analyst used in promotion decisions which distorts incentives.

    -Bonus: there is a SMALL difference in bonus for top performers and bottom performers. It comes out to less than 5k between the top bonus amounts and the lower amounts. This incents mediocrity....why would anyone want to take on a mortgage backed security case (the most boring and longest hours) when a case with less work has no downside. Also, the jump in pay from analyst to senior analyst is laughably small (quite the surprise)

    -Limited lateral exit opps: For those coming from an Ivy with stronger college networks, exits to tech companies, policy jobs, strat consulting seem easier. However, if you have less of a pedigree coming into AG, you will struggle overcoming this. Prestige wise, AG is considered below a McKinsey or Goldman so you will have to fight for a strong exit opp. It can certainly be done, but is not guaranteed.

    -Sub-optimal business school placement: Maybe I'm different from the majority but I define top tier as HBS or GSB and you get maybe 2 or 3 of these a year out of the 25 people applying (and they get in despite AG being on their resume not b/c of AG). You get a lot of Tuck and Sloan but we seem to struggle getting into the highest tier schools. While AG really talks up their "grad school counseling," I prefer to look at the cold hard facts: taking a group of NESCAC undergrads and getting them into Tuck is about average and nothing to write home about. Getting them into HBS or GSB would really be value-add and something actually worth celebrating.

    -Increase in Analyst Turnover + Decline in Glassdoor Ranking: When I started at AG, it was a 4.2 on glassdoor and analysts would stay for 3-4 years and then go to grad school. Now we've fallen to 3.5 on glassdoor with avg. analyst tenure falling to 2 years. The numbers speak for themselves

    -Poor work/life balance: see every other review

    Advice to Management

    Increase in employee turnover coupled with rapidly declining Glassdoor score should prompt some thinking. We pride ourselves on being quantitative and our decline in the Vault consulting ratings should be a warning sign. As well, acceptance rates for incoming analysts are declining. We'll see what happens next.


  11. Helpful (9)

    "Not For People Who Want Work-Life Balance"

    Star Star Star Star Star
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Current Employee - Analyst in Boston, MA
    Current Employee - Analyst in Boston, MA
    Doesn't Recommend
    Neutral Outlook
    No opinion of CEO

    I have been working at Analysis Group full-time (Less than a year)

    Pros

    The pay is good and you get a signing bonus. There's lots of snacks in the kitchen. I also liked that they had in-house training for SAS, Stata, R, and other programs

    Cons

    There really isn't work-life balance, no matter what they say. If you were to come into the office at 8:30am and leave at 5:30pm, it would feel like you were the last one in and first one out. I found the office environment to be very intense and not necessarily warm or inviting. It might be that a lot of people are stressed because there always seem to be short deadlines on many projects. If you enjoy having lots of constant work and don't mind being in an office until 7 or 8pm, then you might be fine here.


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