Ancestry Product Manager Reviews | Glassdoor

Ancestry Product Manager Reviews

2 reviews

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Product Manager

4.0
StarStarStarStarStar
Recommend to a friend
Approve of CEO
Ancestry President & CEO Tim Sullivan
Tim Sullivan
1 Rating

Employee Reviews

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Pros
Cons
  • Too many people in the upper management who goes up the ladder for the wrong reason (in 13 reviews)

  • Call Center work can be hard and some times customers calling in are not the friendliest (in 10 reviews)

More Pros and Cons

  1. Helpful (1)

    "Worthwhile and satisfying consumer products with a few Org hiccups."

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Culture & Values
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Senior Product Manager in San Francisco, CA
    Former Employee - Senior Product Manager in San Francisco, CA
    Recommends
    Neutral Outlook
    Approves of CEO

    I worked at Ancestry full-time (More than 3 years)

    Pros

    Good work life balance. Passionate customers. Interesting and relatable product. New technology options like DNA. Good coworkers. Great Snacks and Beverages. Very nice office. Still a cube farm though.

    Cons

    Provo vs San Francisco issues. Some issues with management opacity and feeling like there's an 'insiders club' and everyone else.


  2. Helpful (1)

    "Great company with lots of growth that is still trying to figure out how to do product management effectively"

    StarStarStarStarStar
    • Work/Life Balance
    • Career Opportunities
    • Comp & Benefits
    • Senior Management
    Former Employee - Product Manager - Customer Acquisition in Provo, UT
    Former Employee - Product Manager - Customer Acquisition in Provo, UT
    No opinion of CEO

    Pros

    Good pay, great benefits and some level of appreciation for the general worker. Found that they engaged the employees in what they were trying to do.

    Cons

    Historically have a challenge in product management. Make decisions but then change direction quickly. Experiment with a new position without thinking it through and then laying people off because they aren't a fit for the organization. Moving product and marketing functions to San Fran.

    Advice to Management

    Get organizational buyoff from departments involved when creating a new position. Make sure the job description is well defined rather than putting expectations on positions that include responsiblities from other departments. Causes inherent problems.